In The News

Welcome to the Department of Neurology


 
FacultyArticle
Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH

A 15-Year-Old Hockey Player with MS May Never Experience a Symptom, Thanks to Colorado Research


It was a school day afternoon when Blaise learned his diagnosis. He came to find out that his parents had received a call from the doctor that day. Soon after, the family had a telehealth appointment with Dr. Teri Schreiner , a pediatric neurologist who specializes in neuroimmunology and the study’s lead pediatric researcher.


Colorado Sun, May 9, 2024

Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

But How Does the Worm Get in Your Brain?

The damage varies depending on the type of parasite and where it ends up in the brain. “Some of them actively invade the tissues and destroy tissues,” said Dr. Daniel Pastula, Chief of Neuro-Infectious Diseases and Global Neurology. Others cause problems because of the inflammatory reaction that they trigger.

The New York Times, May 8, 2024

Scott Rosenthal, MD

IV Ketamine Promising for Severe Refractory Headache in Children

In a retrospective chart review, IV ketamine led to in a 50% reduction in pain at discharge, with “nearly two-thirds” of patients having no recurrence within 30 days, lead investigator Scott Rosenthal, MD, noted. Rosenthal reported the findings (Abstract S20.010) on April 15 at the American Academy of Neurology 2024 annual meeting.

Medscape, April 16, 2024
Jacob Pellinen, MD

Cenobamate’s Efficacy in Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

These results were presented at the 2024 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting, held April 13-18, in Denver, Colorado, by lead author Jacob Pellinen, MD [Assistant Professor of Neurology at CU School of Medicine] and colleagues.

Neurology Live, April 14, 2024
Michelle Leppert, MD, MBA, MS

Nontraditional Risk Factors Play an Outsized Role in Young Adult Stroke Risk

“The younger they are at the time of stroke, the more likely their stroke is due to a nontraditional risk factor,” according to lead author Michelle Leppert, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
 

Medscape, April 4, 2024
Peter Pressman, MD

Lab Probes Aphasia, a Language Disorder That Struck Bruce Willis, Wendy Williams

2 to 4 million people in the U.S. suffer from aphasia, most commonly caused by a traumatic brain injury, tumor or stroke, according to the National Aphasia Association. Dr. Peter Pressman’s lab is studying ways to improve diagnostic techniques and deepen the understanding of communication and behavioral disorders.

CU Anschutz Today, Mar 15, 2024
Danielle Wilhour, MD

Migraine Devices: TikTok Trends or Effective Tools?

Migraine fixes touted by TikTok and other social media channels aren’t always the miracles they claim them to be. From tight-fitting headbands to eye-massaging headsets, many of the “miracle cures” have little to no scientific research backing them up, said
Danielle Wilhour, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology.

CU Anschutz Today, Mar 6, 2024
John Corboy, MD

‘No Surprises’ as Ozanimod Holds up in RMS Extension Trial

Commenting on the findings for Medscape Medical News,
John Corboy, MD, Professor of Neurology, said many formularies limit access to ozanimod “as it has no obvious benefit in comparison to generic fingolimod, which is significantly cheaper.”

Medscape, March 5, 2024
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Redefining Relapse in Efficacy Measures for Multiple Sclerosis Treatments: Stephen Krieger, MD; Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Presented at the February 29 – March 2, 2024 Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) Forum by senior author Stephen Krieger and lead author
Enrique Alvarez, new findings from an analysis suggested that pseudoexacerbations are expected to contribute equally to both arms in clinical trials, which can influence the primary outcome.

MedPage Today, March 4, 2024
Victoria Pelak, MD

Want to Keep Your Brain Healthy and Your Memory Sharp? There’s One Blood Test You Should Get ASAP

“Vascular health is critical to the brain,” says
Victoria S. Pelak, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology. “The primary care doctor can order age-appropriate blood work that targets vascular health, such as blood work for diabetes and cholesterol.”

Jackson (Ga.) Progress-Argus, March 4, 2024
Jeanne Feuerstein, MD

Acting Out Dreams Can Signal a Serious Disorder

REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) should be taken seriously, according to Jeanne Feuerstein, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, because it could also be a precursor of other neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) or Parkinson’s disease.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 29, 2024
Daniel Kramer, MD

A Look Inside Brain-Computer Interfaces and the Potential of Neuralink  

Daniel Kramer, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, is a neurosurgeon and neuroscientist that interprets impulses from the brain to better understand disease processes. He is developing a brain-computer interface program at the University of Colorado School of Medicine focused on sensorimotor restoration. 

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 26, 2024
Naveed Chaudhry, MD

Drug-Resistant Epilepsy in Adults: A Treatment Update

Two new reports demonstrate that a modified Atkins diet, along with anticonvulsant medication, is the most practical approach to seizure reduction. “As promising as it sounds to slash seizure frequency in half or more, the regimen is not easy,” said Naveed Chaudhry, MD.

MedCentral, Feb 26, 2024
Amanda Piquet, MD

Illinois Woman Sheds Light on Experience with Stiff Person Syndrome as Celine Dion's Battle Raises Awareness

“We need to, as a field, define the disease better, diagnose this disease better. And with the recognition now that this disease is getting, that will help and that will move the field forward with clinical trials,” Dr. Amanda Piquet, Associate Professor of Neurology, said.

NBC Chicago, Feb 23, 2024
Diana Quan, MD

Gene Therapy Advances Are a Game Changer for Some Neuromuscular Disorders: The Future Has Arrived

Transthyretin amyloidosis (hATTR) has gone from a disease with very limited treatment options, that was often lethal, to being a treatable disease, if identified early, allowing patients to have a much better life expectancy and quality of life,” noted Diana Quan, MD, Professor of Neurology.

Neurology Today, Feb 15, 2024
Jacob Pellinen, MD

Recognizing When Someone Is Having a Seizure – And How You Can Help During Those First Critical Moments

Epileptologist Dr. Jacob Pellinen walks us through how to recognize a seizure in a bystander or loved one, and what to do in those crucial moments after a seizure begins.

The Conversation, Feb 14, 2024
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

The Evolving Landscape of Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis in 2024: Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Enrique Alvarez
, Associate Professor of Neurology, sat down in an interview with NeurologyLive® to talk about how the surprising findings from evobrutinib trials might shape the landscape of MS treatment criteria.

NeurologyLive, Feb 14, 2024
William Jones, MD

UCHealth Launches a New Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit That Will Operate Full Time in Colorado Springs

"Each and every day, the stroke specialists, nurses and mobile stroke unit teams are focusing on providing the fastest and highest quality care possible for patients, and mobile stroke treatment units are key to expediting such treatment. Mobile stroke units are saving lives and improving outcomes,” said Dr. William Jones, medical director of telestroke and the MSTUs at UCHealth and Associate Professor of Neurology.

UCHealth Today, Feb 14, 2024
Victoria Pelak, MD

Alzheimer’s Study Finds Potential Immune System Link, Mostly in Women

It can help when the caregiver has support from someone outside of the immediate family, says Victoria Pelak, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora.

Brain & Life, February/March 2024
Brianne Bettcher, PhD

Alzheimer’s Study Finds Potential Immune System Link, Mostly in Women

“We were surprised at how strong the effect was,” said 
Brianne Bettcher, PhD , clinical researcher at the University of Colorado Alzheimer's and Cognition Center  (CUACC), who looked with colleagues at the biomarker GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), an important protein believed to be released with CNS injuries, such as stroke or brain injuries.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 5, 2024
Andrew Callen, MD

‘Low Tech’ Innovation Device for Dynamic CT Myelography Improves Care for CSF Leak Patients

Neuroradiologist
Dr. Andrew Callen’s scanning-bed add-on enables safer, more consistent localization of CSF leaks causing intracranial hypotension.

UCHealth Today, Feb 1, 2024
Danielle Wilhour, MD

The 5 Most Common Migraine-Triggering Foods And Drinks

“A migraine trigger refers to any external or internal factor that contributes to the onset of migraine symptoms,” said Danielle Wilhour, Assistant Professor of Neurology and migraine specialist at UCHealth Neurosciences Center. “Combining multiple factors is probably a more potent influence.”

HuffPost, Jan 8, 2024
Kavita Nair, PhD

Neurology Drugs Are Getting Better—and More Expensive—With More Prior Authorization Hassles

For decades, doctors have complained about the onerous practice of prior authorization, which insurers contend is necessary to control costs and encourage evidence-based choices. But seeking prior authorization has become an increasing burden recently for neurologists because of an explosion of new, effective drugs with stratospheric price tags. Dr. Kavita Nair and leaders share their suggestions for revamping the process.

Neurology Today, Jan 4, 2024
 
FacultyArticle
Victoria Pelak, MD

Can a Vision Test Detect a Brain Disease?

Delays in diagnosing posterior cortical atrophy syndrome are common, but a new set of recommendations developed by CU Neuro-Ophthalmologist Victoria Pelak, MD, could signal doctors that a patient’s vision problems are actually occurring in the brain.

CU Anschutz Today, Dec. 11, 2023
Douglas Ney, MD

Brain Cancer Patient Recruits the CU Cancer Center for the Fight of His Life

After Ironman competitor, Alex Cooper, completed his 10th Ironman in September 2022, he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma in January 2023. Thanks to the care of our Oncology team, including
Douglas Ney, MD, (Professor of Neurology and Oncology), Alex walked 3 miles on his first day home and was skiing after six weeks.

CU Cancer Center, Dec. 4, 2023
Isabelle Buard, PhD

Musical Bedicine for Parkinson’s Disease

“When you’re sleeping, your frequencies of your brain are actually slowing down so that you can get peaceful. You can get rested,” said Isabelle Buard, PhD, Assistant Research Professor of Neurology. “When you do something more intense — you write, you think, you hear, you move — those are actually generic bursts of high frequency oscillations."

Drug Discovery News, Nov. 15, 2023
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Should MS Patients Stop Treatment as They Age?

In this exclusive video,
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD offered perspective on data from the DISCOMS study that was recently published in Lancet Neurology, and addressed some of the challenges when deciding whether patients with MS should discontinue disease-modifying therapy (DMT) as they get older.

MedPage Today, Nov. 13, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

6 Ways to Reduce Brain Fog and Improve Mental Clarity

“Brain fog isn’t a medical diagnosis,” Danielle Wilhour, an assistant professor in neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told Everyday Health. “Rather, it’s a casual, or lay, term used to describe an umbrella of cognitive symptoms.”

Deseret News (Salt Lake City), Oct. 30, 2023
Kavita Nair, PhD

Medicare's Drug Price Negotiation Program Is Underway:  What Does It Mean for Neurologists?

Kavita Nair, PhD
, Professor of Neurology and Pharmacy, said that Medicare price negotiation—a provision of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 signed into law on Aug. 16, 2022—is as important as the 2006 legislation adding Part D coverage to Medicare and passage of the Affordable Care Act to expand insurance coverage in 2010. “Neurologists need to know that this is historic legislation,” she said.

Neurology Today, October 19, 2023
Amy Amara, MD

Parkinson’s Disease and Sleep: A Complicated Pairing

Trying to get a full night’s rest while living with Parkinson’s disease is often easier said than done.
Amy Amara, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology and Movement Disorders Section Head at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, helps patients navigate the challenges. Dr. Amara became interested in sleep medicine after seeing how her patients with Parkinson’s struggle with sleep. 

CU Anschutz Today, October 10, 2023
Samantha Holden, MD, MS

How Air Pollution May Influence Brain Health

“The full gamut of neurodegenerative diseases — Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS —all have risk factors associated with environmental exposures. We know that exposure to pesticides and herbicides seems to be one of the clearest risks,” says 
Samantha Holden, MD, Vice Chair of Outpatient Neurology Services and Director of the Memory Disorders Clinic.

CU Anschutz Today, October 4, 2023
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Deadly, Treatment-Resistant Fungus Sees Notable Rise

The fungus Candida auris is showing up more frequently in high-risk areas such as intensive care units at hospitals, posing a serious risk especially for immunocompromised patients. This fungul blood infection spreads quickly in the immunocompromised and can kill one in three patients.
Dr. Daniel Pastula describes steps to prevent and limit risk.

CU Anschutz Today, October 2, 2023

Maureen Stabio, PhD

Five Questions for Maureen Stabio

Vice Director of the Modern Human Anatomy Program,
Maureen Stabio, PhD (Associate Professor of Cell & Developmental Biology and Neurology), outreaches to put high school students in touch with anatomy – and future possibilities in higher education.

CU Connections, September 28, 2023
Amanda Piquet, MD

What Is Stiff Person Syndrome and Can You Still Have Sex?

However, the exact incidence of SPS is unknown, according to Dr. Amanda Piquet, Director of autoimmune neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We don’t have large-scale epidemiology studies needed to know the true prevalence of the disease,” she said. “It’s a very rare disease that often goes unrecognized and misdiagnosed.”

Giddy, Sept. 11, 2023
Brice McConnell. MD, PhD

'A Fitness Tracker for Brain Health': Headband Seeks Early Signs of Alzheimer’s During Sleep

Led by the study’s senior author,
Dr. Brice McConnell, CU Anschutz researchers have conducted a large-scale study assessing how effective a simple wearable device is at gauging brain health. The device is a lightweight headband worn during sleep that monitors brainwaves, capable of identifying disruptions that are possible biomarkers of early signs of Alzheimer's and dementia.

CU Anschutz Today, Aug. 23, 2023

Victoria Pelak, MD
Samantha Holden, MD

Peter Pressman, MD

How well does Leqembi work to fight Alzheimer’s?

Drs.
Victoria Pelak, Samantha Holden and Peter Pressman, of the University of Colorado Memory Disorders Clinic , explain that while the first FDA-approved Alzheimer’s drug revives hope for battling the devastating Alzheimer's, it is not a cure and represents one small step in unraveling the mysteries of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

UCHealth Today
, August 11, 2023

William Jones, MD

Groundbreaking Stroke Study Seeks Ways to Keep Brain Cells Alive

In partnership with the UCHealth Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit, researchers Drs.
William Jones, Michael Graner, Robert Kowalski, and team are measuring blood samples of patients within minutes of stroke onset and discovering data that could change the way many stroke patients are treated.

CU Anschutz Today
, August 16, 2023

Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

West Nile Infections Rising in the US

Dr. Daniel Pastula, chief of neuroinfectious diseases and global neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Colorado School of Public Health, says the state is watching troubling signs as well. “The concern this year,” Pastula said, “particularly along the Front Range in Colorado, is we’ve found many more mosquitoes [that are] positive for West Nile earlier in the season compared with other years.”

Medscape, Aug. 11, 2023

Lisa Brenner, PhD

TBI Increases Mental Health Diagnoses, Time to Suicide

“We had had pieces of these findings for a long time but to be able to lay out this longitudinal story over time is the part that’s new and important to really switch the focus to people’s whole lives and things that happen over time, both psychological and physical,” lead author
Dr. Lisa Brenner, director of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center, Aurora, Colorado, who also is a Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Psychiatry, and Neurology at the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, told Medscape Medical News.

Medscape, Aug. 10, 2023
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Do Tick Bites Cause a Red Meat Allergy? What to Know About The Rise of Alpha Gal Syndrome

“This is probably not a new syndrome, but a newly-recognized syndrome. We’re still learning a lot about it,”
Daniel Pastula, the chief of neuroinfectious diseases and global neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Colorado School of Public Health, told Health.

Health, Aug. 9, 2023

Danielle Wilhour, MDWomen Get Far More Migraines Than Men –Neurologist Danielle Wilhour, MD, Explains Why, and What Brings Relief

About 800 million people worldwide 
get migraine headaches ; in the U.S. alone, about 39 million , or approximately 12% of the population, have them regularly. And most of these people are women. More than three times as many women  as compared to men get migraines. For women ages 18 to 49, migraine is the leading cause of disability throughout the world .

The Conversation
, August 9, 2023

Christopher Filley, MD

Victoria Pelak, MD

What Is Prosopagnosia? An Odd Condition That Can Steal Your Face

A potentially isolating condition affecting at least one in 50 people impairs their ability to recognize a face. Two CU Anschutz Neurology experts –Drs. Christopher Filley and
Victoria Pelak –share what providers know and don’t know about this complex loss of function.

CU Anschutz Today, August 7, 2023

Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Stem Cell Medical Tourism Leads to Meningitis in MS Patient

 In October 2022, the woman in her 30s traveled to Baja California, Mexico, and received two lumbar punctures of the stem cell product as a “treatment” for MS after researching the clinic online, Dr. Daniel Pastula, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Colorado School of Public Health, and colleagues (Drs. Wolf, Money, Piquet, Tyler, et al.) reported in Emerging Infectious Diseases .

MedPage Today, July 12, 2023
Kevin Messacar, MD

WHO report on deadly virus among babies in 3 countries has U.S. doctors on edge

 That’s why it’s critical for pediatricians to be on the lookout for the potential for severe illness in newborns, rather than “be behind the eight ball when things pick up and get out of control,” said Dr. Kevin Messacar, pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado and Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at CU School of Medicine.

NBC News, July 6, 2023
Scott Rosenthal, MD

IV ketamine reduced pain by 50% in pediatric patients with refractory headache

 “Patients with severe and refractory headaches often have few options for treatment despite ongoing pain and significant disability,” Dr. Scott Rosenthal, Neurology Headache Medicine Fellow at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and colleagues wrote. “Ketamine has emerged as a potential therapeutic option and had demonstrated benefit in other chronic pain syndromes.”

Healio, June 30, 2023
John Corboy, MD

Stopping DMTs a ‘Reasonable Option’ for Some Older MS Patients

 “This study will aid decision-making when health care providers and people with multiple sclerosis discuss potential disease-modifying therapy discontinuation as patients age,” Dr. John Corboy, Professor of Neurology and the trial’s lead researcher, said in a press release .

Multiple Sclerosis News Today, June 26, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

Why Do Women Suffer Migraines More Frequently and Severely Than Men?

 Women’s overall quality of life can be significantly impacted by migraines. During National Migraine Awareness Month, Danielle Wilhour, MD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology, describes how women and men experience migraines differently, and proper treatment for them.

CU Anschutz Today, June 16, 2023
Jacob Pellinen, MD

Seizures While Driving Highlight Importance of Diagnosis of Epilepsy

“Seizures while driving pose substantial risks for those experiencing them and for others on the road,” said study author Jacob Pellinen, MD of the University of Colorado and American Academy of Neurology member.

HealthDay, June 9, 2023
Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH

COVID-19 Severity in Pediatric Patients With MS on B-Cell-Depleting Therapies

In a recently published study conducted by lead author Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH and colleagues, B-cell-depleting treatment was associated with a higher risk of COVID-19 infection, higher rates of hospitalization, and ICU admission in pediatric patients with MS (POMS) and related disorders. These findings suggest that these therapies, commonly used in the MS field, come with a higher risk of severe infection.

NeurologyLive®, May 18, 2023

Naveed Chaudhry, MD

Adverse Life Stressors Have a Disproportionate Effect on Many Pregnant Women With Epilepsy

“We are overall doing a good job medically managing women with epilepsy during pregnancy, and they are doing well,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Naveed Chaudhry, assistant professor of neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine. “But this research suggests that women with epilepsy are having more stress in pregnancy, some of which may be recognized and at least some of it going unnoticed.”

Neurology Today, May 18, 2023
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Maine Resident Dies of Rare Tick-Borne Virus as Cases Spread Across U.S.

“Most people who are infected have no symptoms and fully recover,” Dr. Daniel Pastula, associate professor of neurology, infectious diseases and epidemiology, previously told Newsweek. “A subset, within one to four weeks develop a pretty bad flu-like illness. And a subset of those people develop Powassan neuroinvasive disease. That’s where we are seeing the severity.”

Newsweek, May 18, 2023

Here's How to Avoid a Spring Surge of Hungry Ticks
CU Anschutz Today, May 18, 2023
Amy Amara, MD

Michael J. Fox Legacy: ‘Time Travel’ or Parkinson’s Cure?

Exactly one month before the public release of a documentary on Michael J. Fox and his life with Parkinson’s disease (PD), the actor’s research foundation announced a landmark discovery – a novel test that can biologically diagnose the disease in live patients, even before symptoms emerge. “They’ve had a profound impact,” said Amy Amara, MD, of The Michael J. Fox Foundation ’s influence on PD research worldwide, including at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “It has led to an explosion of findings in the literature,” said Amara, a Parkinson’s researcher and professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine .

CU Anschutz Today, May 15, 2023
Dr. Huntington PotterThe Search for Alzheimer’s Therapies: Understanding the Biochemistry of Harmful Plaques in the Brain

The University of Colorado School of Medicine research team’s work on Alzheimer’s disease is yielding laboratory insights into the roots of the degenerative brain disease that have leapt to human clinical trials at UCHealth in short order.

UCHealth Today, April 5, 2023
Sharon Poisson, MD, MAS

UCHealth offers new more effective medication treatment for stroke patients

Tenecteplase is easier to administer – a single, immediate IV push that takes just five seconds, according to Dr. Sharon Poisson, Neurohospitalist and Medical Co-director of the Comprehensive Stroke Program at UCHealth and Associate Professor of Neurology at CU School of Medicine.

Greeley Tribune, March 21, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

Understanding Headache Pain and Its Treatment

If one searched for an experience shared by nearly everyone, headaches would be an unpleasant standout candidate. Indeed, the government declares headaches “the most common form of pain” in the country and a major reason for missed work and clinic appointments. Dr. Danielle Wilhour (Assistant Professor of Neurology-Headache/Pain Medicine) describes them and discusses treatments.

UCHealth Today, March 20, 2023
Anna Shah, MD

What you need to know about Multiple Sclerosis

Dr. Anna Shah, Assistant Professor of Neurology who specializes in patients with MS and other related disorders of the nervous system, joined 9News to talk about the disease.

9News, March 17, 2023
Emily Forbes, DO, MS

Expert perspectives: The future of Huntington’s disease management and treatment

“The three main pillars of management include lifestyle changes, pharmacologic management, and rehabilitation services, such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy,” said Dr. Emily Forbes, director of the Huntington’s Disease Society of American (HDSA) Center of Excellence at the University of Colorado.

Medical News Today, March 1, 2023
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Ocrelizumab and Rituximab Demonstrate Similar Safety, Efficacy in Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

Senior investigator Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, and colleagues randomly selected patients treated with ocrelizumab (n = 245) and rituximab (n = 182), and observed outcomes such as lab data, relapse history, adverse events (AEs), MRI outcomes, disease history, and patient characteristics.

Neurology Live, Feb. 25, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

7 Tips to Beat Brain Fog, Foster Focus, and Improve Mental Clarity

Brain fog isn’t a medical diagnosis. Rather, it’s a casual, or lay, term used to describe an umbrella of cognitive symptoms, says Dr. Danielle Wilhour , Assistant Professor of Neurology

Everyday Health, Feb. 23, 2023
Maria Nagel, MD

Study Suggests Fructose Could Drive Alzheimer's Disease

An evolutionary foraging instinct that relied on the sugar fructose may now be fueling the formation of Alzheimer’s disease, according to Dr. Maria Nagel and colleague, Dr. Richard Johnson.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 13, 2023

Zach Cox, DO

Implicit Bias, Late Diagnosis Create Critical ALS Healthcare Gap

Zach Cox, DO, finds diagnostic delays in Black ALS patients prevents life-altering therapies.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 13, 2023


Faculty Article
Sharon Poisson, MD, MAS

UCHealth offers new more effective medication treatment for stroke patients

Tenecteplase is easier to administer – a single, immediate IV push that takes just five seconds, according to Dr. Sharon Poisson, Neurohospitalist and Medical Co-director of the Comprehensive Stroke Program at UCHealth and Associate Professor of Neurology at CU School of Medicine.

Greeley Tribune, March 21, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

Understanding Headache Pain and Its Treatment

If one searched for an experience shared by nearly everyone, headaches would be an unpleasant standout candidate. Indeed, the government declares headaches “the most common form of pain” in the country and a major reason for missed work and clinic appointments. Dr. Danielle Wilhour (Assistant Professor of Neurology-Headache/Pain Medicine) describes them and discusses treatments.

UCHealth Today, March 20, 2023
Anna Shah, MD

What you need to know about Multiple Sclerosis

Dr. Anna Shah, Assistant Professor of Neurology who specializes in patients with MS and other related disorders of the nervous system, joined 9News to talk about the disease.

9News, March 17, 2023
Emily Forbes, DO, MS

Expert perspectives: The future of Huntington’s disease management and treatment

“The three main pillars of management include lifestyle changes, pharmacologic management, and rehabilitation services, such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy,” said Dr. Emily Forbes, director of the Huntington’s Disease Society of American (HDSA) Center of Excellence at the University of Colorado.

Medical News Today, March 1, 2023
Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD

Ocrelizumab and Rituximab Demonstrate Similar Safety, Efficacy in Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

Senior investigator Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, and colleagues randomly selected patients treated with ocrelizumab (n = 245) and rituximab (n = 182), and observed outcomes such as lab data, relapse history, adverse events (AEs), MRI outcomes, disease history, and patient characteristics.

Neurology Live, Feb. 25, 2023
Danielle Wilhour, MD

7 Tips to Beat Brain Fog, Foster Focus, and Improve Mental Clarity

Brain fog isn’t a medical diagnosis. Rather, it’s a casual, or lay, term used to describe an umbrella of cognitive symptoms, says Dr. Danielle Wilhour , Assistant Professor of Neurology

Everyday Health, Feb. 23, 2023
Maria Nagel, MD

Study Suggests Fructose Could Drive Alzheimer's Disease

An evolutionary foraging instinct that relied on the sugar fructose may now be fueling the formation of Alzheimer’s disease, according to Dr. Maria Nagel and colleague, Dr. Richard Johnson.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 13, 2023

Zach Cox, DO

Implicit Bias, Late Diagnosis Create Critical ALS Healthcare Gap

Zach Cox, DO, finds diagnostic delays in Black ALS patients prevents life-altering therapies.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb 13, 2023

Andrew Bubak, PhD Olfactory Viral Inflammation May Accelerate the Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease

“We know that one of the early signs of Alzheimer’s disease is losing the sense of smell,” said the study’s lead author Andrew Bubak, PhD, Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Neurology.

News-Medical, Dec. 15, 2022
John Corboy, MD Should Rituximab Be Considered for Relapsing Forms of MS? Some Specialists Make the Case for It

Dr. John R. Corboy, co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Professor of Neurology, noted that the ICER assessment did not, however, include rituximab, a monoclonal antibody used heavily in some parts of the US, though almost never in others, as an off-label treatment for MS.

Neurology Today, Dec. 15, 2022
Victoria Pelak, MD How Long Can Running Keep Alzheimer’s at Bay?

“We all have healthy cells inside of our brain that allow us to speak, talk, and think,” says Dr. Victoria Pelak, Professor of Neurology and one of the many specialists the Macys have consulted since 2018. “They interact with other cells in the cortex that do a lot of automated functions, like keeping our heart rate going, or allowing us to digest.” For all of us, those cells begin to die off in our 40s, but in an Alzheimer’s patient it’s accelerated “10 to 100 times beyond the speed of death of our brain cells in the cortex over time,” she says.

Runner’s World, Dec. 12, 2022
Christopher Filley, MD Former Broncos Players To Donate Their Brains to CTE Research

“People in professional sports and even in college sports will sustain hundreds or even thousands of injuries in a single season, perhaps. And that’s a significant problem. We think that these those injuries can cause long-term damage over years that could result in dementia,” said Dr. Christopher Filley, a Professor of Neurology who studies brain injuries for UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.

Fox31, Dec. 11, 2022
Zachary Macchi, MD Aggression Aimed at Caregivers in Parkinson’s Linked to Patients’ Grief

“This is an issue that we think is very much underrecognized,” Dr. Zachary Macchi, who led the study, said in a press release, adding that “this is a factor likely driving caregiver burden for some people.”

Parkinson’s News Today, Nov. 9, 2022
Andrew Bubak, PhD Mystery Solved? How Shingles Can Increase Stroke Risk

The study’s corresponding author is Assistant Professor of Neurology, Dr. Andrew Bubak. “We now have to start thinking about infectious diseases a bit differently — once infection has resolved, disease is not over. Persistent exosomes may continue to trigger pathologies thought to be unrelated to, and distant from, the site of the original infection,” Bubak told MNT.

Medical News Today, Nov. 4, 2022
John Corboy, MD Should We Discontinue Medications in Older Patients With Multiple Sclerosis?

Dr. John Corboy, Professor of Neurology and Medical Director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center, started the first trials, just recently completed, and discusses in this podcast.

Medscape, Nov. 3, 2022
Kevin Messacar, MD, PhD

Colorado’s RSV Hospitalizations Already Above Last Year’s Peak as Children’s Hospitals Brace for Worse

Once that started to die down, RSV infections took off, said Dr. Kevin Messacar, an infectious disease specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and associate professor of pediatrics and neurology at CU School of Medicine]. If a difficult flu season follows that, pediatric hospitals and units will be stretched in the way that adult hospitals were during COVID-19 surges, he said.

Denver Post, Nov. 2, 2022

Kenneth Tyler, MD


In a Year It Was Supposed to Flare, Polio-like Syndrome in Kids Doesn’t, Adding to Mystery

Physicians who treat children who develop a strange polio-like syndrome known as acute flaccid myelitis had been steeling themselves this Fall for an onslaught of cases of the irreversible condition, which appears to be triggered by infection with an enterovirus known as EV-D68.

STAT, Oct. 31, 2022

Andrew Bubak, PhD

Study Finds Link Between Shingles and Elevated Risk of Strokes

Pharmacy Times, Nov. 1, 2022

Researchers Reveal Why Shingles Can Cause Strokes

CU Anschutz Today, Oct. 27, 2022

“Most people know about the painful rash associated with shingles, but they may not know that the risk of stroke is elevated for a year after infection,” said the study’s lead author Dr. Andrew Bubak, Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Kevin Messacar, MD, PhD

Surge of Viruses Leaves Children’s Hospitals Scrambling to Free Up Beds and Find Room for Patients

Dr. Kevin Messacar, infectious disease specialist and neurologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado, said his hospital is accepting patients from five nearby states. . . “If we get influenza on top of RSV, that is going to put another significant strain on the system. If we can get as many people vaccinated as possible and protect as many kids as possible to try to help with the burden as we’re getting through RSV season, that would be welcome news for all of us in pediatric medicine.”

NBC News, Oct. 25, 2022

Pandemic ‘Immunity Gap’ Is Probably Behind Surge in RSV Cases

CNN, Oct 26, 2022

Huntington Potter, PhD Gene Involved in Neuronal Structure and Function May Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

The overexpression of a gene tied to cell division and the structure and function of neurons may prevent and protect against cognitive decline in both mice and humans with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to a new study by scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

CU Anschutz Today, Oct 25, 2022
Jacob Pellinen, MD Why Seizures Are Often Hard to Diagnose

Seizures can be hard to diagnose. In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Colorado’s Jacob Pellinen, MD determines why.

Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 7, 2022
Kevin Messacar, MD, PhD Why You Should Think Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Not Just Polio: The Signs and Symptoms to Look For

Kevin Messacar, MD, PhD said the polio case in New York should also alert clinicians to the possibility of AFM in general, which can be caused by multiple viruses, including poliovirus, other enteroviruses, and West Nile virus.

Neurology Today, Oct. 6, 2022
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS Experts Say Vaccines, Behavior Changes Worked as Colorado’s Monkeypox Cases Decline

If the virus were to have jumped into a different social network — say, a prison or a child care center — there could have been a new surge in infections, said Dr. Daniel Pastula.

Colorado Sun, Oct. 3, 2022
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

CU Researcher Describes First Cases of Encephalomyelitis Resulting From Monkeypox Virus
CU Anschutz Today, Sept. 21, 2022

Brain Inflammation, Spinal Cord Lesions Emerge in U.S. Monkeypox Cases
MedsPage Today, Sept. 14, 2022

CDC Reports Two Cases of Monkeypox-Related Encephalomyelitis
Medscape, Sept. 14, 2022

How Does Monkeypox Affect the Brain?
Self, Sept. 12, 2022

Polio Declared a Disaster in New York as Virus Spreads
WSKG, Sept. 11, 2022

Kevin Messacar, MD, PhD

CDC Warns About Enterovirus in Kids – and the Risk of Rare Paralysis That Can Follow
CBS News, Sept. 12, 2022

With Increased Virus Activity, Providers Urged to Be Alert for Signs of Rare Polio-like Syndrome in Kids

STAT, Sept. 12, 2022

Kenneth Tyler, MD

Is Monkeypox Neuroinvasive?

Monkeypox virus has the potential to be neuroinvasive based on animal models, case series from previous outbreaks, and preliminary reports currently under investigation, reported Drs. Kenneth Tyler and Daniel Pastula, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, in an overview published in Annals of Neurology.

MedPage Today, August 19, 2022

Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Should Coloradans Worry about Polio? Depends on Whether They’re Vaccinated
Denver Post
, August 19, 2022

Could Polio Come Back? What to Know about the Virus
Fox31
, August 15, 2022

The four-shot sequence of polio vaccines is more than 99% effective at preventing paralysis and death from the virus, said Dr. Daniel Pastula, who studies infectious diseases affecting the nervous system at the University of Colorado Anschutz campus.
Sharon Poisson, MD, MAS Risk Factors in Kids Linked to Stroke as Soon as 30s, 40s

“While strokes in childhood and very early adulthood are not likely caused by atherosclerotic risk factors, it does look like these risk factors increase throughout early and young adulthood and become significant risk factors for stroke in the 30s and 40s,” noted lead author Sharon N. Poisson, MD, MAS, Associate Professor of Neurology.

Medscape, August 12, 2022
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS What Coloradans Need to Know About Monkeypox

Dr. Daniel Pastula, Neuroinfectious Disease specialist and Associate Professor of Neurology: "Monkeypox is what we call a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be spread between animals and people. Back in 2003, a shipment of pet prairie dogs [which were housed with infected rodents imported from Ghana] caused an outbreak in the United States. Since then, it’s really only been identified in central or western Africa."

5280, August 11, 2022
Noah Johson, PhD Huntington Potter, PhD

2 Common Psychiatric Drugs May Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s
Medical News Today, July 7, 2022

CU Anschutz Researchers Identify Drugs That Curb Alzheimer’s Symptoms
CBS4, June 29, 2022

New research at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus finds two FDA-approved drugs improve cognition in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The surprising findings came after scientists screened hundreds of drugs to see which blocked formation of the amyloid plaques in the brain that lead to Alzheimer’s. Drs. Noah Johnson and Huntington Potter are trying to get to the root of what causes Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Samantha Holden What Robin Williams’ Widow Wants You to Know about the Future of Lewy Body Dementia

“We can’t undo changes that have already occurred,” said Dr. Samantha Holden, Associate Professor of Neurology and Director of the Memory Disorders Clinic at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. “But if we catch people early enough, can we prevent it from progressing?”

CNN, July 4, 2022
Maria Nagel, MD Social Media Swirls With Unsupported Claims About Cause of Justin and Hailey Bieber’s Medical Conditions

“It’s purely speculative when you look at a single case report and try to conclude causation or even an association,” Dr. Maria Nagel, a neurologist and neurovirologist who studies VZV at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told us. Saying there’s a link would be “like a few people reporting that they stubbed their toe after vaccination and we conclude that [the] vaccine causes stubbed toes.”

FactCheck.org, June 22, 2022

John Corboy, MD

No Clear Answers From MS Drug Discontinuation Trial

“While we did not get a perfect answer either way, this is perhaps the most likely outcome we might have expected — a possible small amount of excess new MRI activity primarily, but of unclear clinical significance,” study co-investigator Dr. John Corboy, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and director at the Rocky Mountain MS Center at the University of Colorado, told Medscape Medical News.

Medscape, June 20, 2022
David Beckham, MD Long COVID: Learning as We Go

David Beckham, Associate Professor of Medicine, Immunology and microbiology, and Neurology, told Infectious Disease Special Edition that hospitalization from SARS-CoV-2, so far, is the most prominent predictor of which patients will be affected by long COVID.

Infectious Disease Special Edition, June 1, 2022
Kenneth Tyler, MD Enterovirus D68, Long Suspected Cause of Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Found in Anterior Horn Cells

Kenneth Tyler, Professor and Chair of Neurology, previously created a mouse model in which EV-D68 caused AFM-like paralysis. In an interview with Neurology Today, he said he considered the paper to be important in establishing the cause of AFM.

Neurology Today, May 27, 2022
Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS

Neurologic Effects of Monkeypox Virus Remain Mild: What to Look for and How to Treat
Neurology Today, July 7, 2022

What is Monkeypox? What to Know About Symptoms, the Smallpox Vaccine and More

CNET, May 24, 2022

Rare Spread of Monkeypox Puts Health Experts on Alert
 
UCHealth Today, May 23, 2022

Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Neurology and Infectious Disease, explains how serious the disease is, how it spreads and why vigilance is necessary to keep the outbreak in check.

Christopher Filley, MD You’ve Likely Heard of the Brain’s Gray Matter – Here’s Why the White Matter is Important, Too

Dr. Christopher Filley, Professor of Neurology, has long studied white matter pathology. Located below the surface of the brain, even the most high-tech imaging can’t easily resolve its details. But recent findings, made possible by advancements in brain imaging and autopsy examinations, are beginning to show researchers how critical white matter is.

The Conversation, May 5, 2022

Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH

John Corboy, MD

CU Anschutz Scientists Spot Signs of Multiple Sclerosis Before Symptoms Start

CU Anschutz researchers began studying patients with multiple sclerosis and their first-degree relatives in hopes of identifying disease before symptoms even strike. Now, they are doing just that, potentially altering lives.

CU Anschutz Today, Mar. 22, 2022

Maria Nagel, MD

Diego Restrepo, PhD

Could Viruses, Olfactory ‘Railroad Track’ Unlock Alzheimer’s Puzzle?

From a chance meeting at a 2018 conference, Maria Nagel, MD and Diego Restrepo, PhD are collaboratively investigating possible triggers and accelerants of early onset Alzheimer’s and potential therapies. They join Dr. Thomas Flaig, Vice Chancellor for Research, in a stimulating podcast discussion.

CU Anschutz Today, Mar. 16, 2022
Dr. Samantha Holden How Can I Be a Better Caregiver for My Loved One with Alzheimer’s?

Samantha Holden, MD, Director of the Memory Disorders Clinic at the CU Anschutz Alzheimer's and Cognition Center, provides guidance on how to care for your loved one with Alzheimer's.

CU Anschutz Today, Feb. 7, 2022
Sharon Poisson, MD Young Women at Higher Risk for Stroke Than Male Peers: Study

The study cannot pinpoint the reasons for the higher risk among young women, said researcher Dr. Sharon Poisson, Associate Professor of Neurology. However, she said, pregnancy is one likely contributor: Pregnancy-related conditions, including blood clots, high blood pressure and diabetes, can raise a woman's risk of stroke.

HealthDay, Jan. 25, 2022
John Corboy, MD Strong New Evidence Suggests a Virus Triggers Multiple Sclerosis

“This is a very intriguing article that extends our understanding of the role of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in MS development,” Dr. John Corboy, Neurologist and Co-director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center at the University of Colorado, told STAT.

STAT, Jan. 13, 2022

Faculty Article
David Beckham, MD Pfizer Says Its COVID-19 Booster Protects Against Omicron

Dr. David Beckham has been studying the variants in a biosafety lab on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. He said the mutations on the omicron variant are allowing it to “sidestep” immune protections more than other variants. “Omicron has multiple mutations and a lot more mutations than any other variants that we’ve seen so far,” he said. “So for example, delta has a handful, six or so in this spike protein, and omicron has about 30.”

Fox31, Dec. 8, 2021
Jeanne Feuerstein, MD Coloradans Looking to KO Parkinson’s Find Refuge in the Boxing Ring

Parkinson’s patients who show continuous improvement or stabilized motor scores also tend to show improvement in their exercise program, notes Dr. Jeanne Feuerstein, movement disorders specialist and Assistant Professor of Neurology.

Colorado Sun, Nov. 18, 2021
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website West Nile Virus Cases Climbing in Colorado

The mosquito-borne illness is known to cause fever and headaches, and in severe cases, can cause neuroinvasive disease such as encephalitis, a brain infection, or meningitis, or death. Yet, 80% of those who contract the virus don’t show symptoms, according to Dr. Daniel Pastula, Associate Professor of Neurology, Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Colorado School of Public Health.

Colorado Sun, Oct. 9, 2021

Brianne Bettcher, PhD

Potter, Huntington_web

Can COVID-19 Boost Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease? Early Studies Look at Links

Recent findings linking COVID-19 and Alzheimer’s disease have sparked concern among experts, taking the spotlight at the July Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Denver and prompting an “urgent” call from the Alzheimer’s Disease International for “fast-tracking” research on the issue.

CU Anschutz Today, Sept 29, 2021
Jeanne Feuerstein, MD Can exercise help patients gain ground on Parkinson’s disease?

The SPARX3 trial extends investigations of exercise’s ability to slow the progression of the debilitating movement disorder. “What I always say to my patients is I can give you medications that will make you function as well as you can, but the reason I’m doing it is so you can exercise,” Dr. Jeanne Feuerstein said. “That’s the key to actually modify the progression of the disease.”

UCHealth Today, Sept. 28, 2021
Jones William, MD Research Shows Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Saves Patients' Lives

The New England Journal of Medicine has published the results of the BEST-MSU study. Data from patients treated in the UCHealth Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit (MSTU), just the third mobile stroke unit in the U.S. when it began making its urgent house calls in January 2016, informed the study; Dr. William Jones, the CU School of Medicine and UCHealth neurologist who championed the MSTU, is a coauthor.

UCHealth Today, Sept. 8, 2021
Colorado Springs Gazette, Sept. 9, 2021
Potter, Huntington_web2 Researchers Looking into Connection between COVID-19 and Alzheimer’s

Huntington Potter, PhD, Professor of Neurology at CU Anschutz, says new research shows a connection between COVID-19 and Alzheimer's disease.

9News, Sept. 7, 2021
Marius Birlea, MD Migraine: Not Just a Headache

The first thing that neurologist and certified headache specialist Dr. Marius Birlea wants people to understand about a migraine is that the condition is a neurological disease.

Steamboat Pilot & Today, Aug. 29, 2021
Laura Strom, MD

Exploring the Mystery of Non-epileptic Seizures

Symptoms are similar to epilepsy but do not trigger abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Causes lie in a borderland between neurology and psychology, according to Dr. Laura Strom, Associate Professor of Neurology.

UCHealth Today
, August 20, 2021

Edward Maa, MD How Do Dogs Sniff Out Diseases?

It’s not clear how our bodies make menthone, says Dr. Edward Maa, University of Colorado Neurologist, and most of the time, researchers don’t think of humans needing to produce any smells when in distress. “We don’t typically think of humans as needing alarm pheromones because we have speech,” Maa says.

Discover, July 19, 2021
Dr. Drew Kern Remote Deep-Brain Stimulation Programming Saves ‘Money and Miles’ for Patient with Parkinson’s Disease

The newly approved Abbott system enables telehealth consultation and adjustment to deep-brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease, as administered by Dr. Drew Kern and colleagues.

UCHealth Today, July 12, 2021
Dr. Kevin Messacar COVID Protections Kept Other Viruses at Bay. Now They’re Back.

“There’s nothing about enteroviruses that makes them love even years—they don’t have a lucky number,” says Dr. Kevin Messacar, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Colorado and Children's Hospital Colorado, who was a coauthor on that March analysis. “The model for this whole family of viruses, which is well-described, would not predict that we would wait until 2022 for an outbreak because we missed a cycle. It would say we are continually growing the pool of susceptibles who haven’t seen that virus.”

WIRED, July 6, 2021
David Beckham, MD Excitement for All-Star Week Grows, As Well As Concern for the Delta Variant’s Spread

“If you are not vaccinated, still wear a mask and avoid groups of large gatherings like the All-Star Game, because you would be at risk. There is going to be an unknown number of unvaccinated people that may or may not be infected with the virus,” said Dr. David Beckham, Neuro-Infectious Disease expert.

Channel 7, June 30, 2021
Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH Neurologists See Few Risks, Many Benefits of COVID-19 Vaccines for Younger Adolescents

For such youth, the strategy is to extend the interval between vaccination and infusion, said Dr. Teri Schreiner, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology. “For kids who are getting infusions of anti-B cell therapies, we recommend getting their second vaccination at least four weeks before infusion, or 12 weeks after the infusion,” Schreiner said.

Neurology Today, June 17, 2021
Victoria Pelak, MD Newly Approved Alzheimer’s Drug Spurs Hope and Controversy

CU Anschutz experts weigh in on first-of-its-kind therapy, and gear up to take part in further clinical studies.

CU Anschutz Today, June 15, 2021
Huntington Potter, PhD What you need to know about the FDA-approved drug for Alzheimer’s

“Usually FDA-approved drugs are covered by insurance and Medicare and Medicaid,” said Dr. Huntington Potter, Director of the University of Colorado Alzheimer’s and Cognition Center.

Channel 7, June 9, 2021
Laura Foster, MD ALS Day is June 2nd

“Cure sometimes, treat often, comfort always, especially as it relates to ALS because there isn’t a cure yet," said CU Medicine neurologist Dr. Laura Foster about ALS and how to help those with the disease. Major League Baseball has declared June 2nd as Lou Gehrig Day to help raise funds in the battle against ALS.

CU Medicine-Care for U Newsletter, May 24, 2021
Danielle Wilhour, MD 15 Migraine Triggers You Need to Know About

Stress is the No. 1 trigger for migraine, says Dr. Danielle Wilhour, Assistant Professor of Neurology. She points to past research in the journal Headache. Of 200 new migraine patients, 91 percent said they had at least one migraine trigger, and the most commonly reported (by 59 percent of respondents) was emotional stress.

The Healthy, May 17, 2021
Kenneth Tyler, MD ‘We’re really in the early days’ of Understanding Neurological Issues with COVID-19

“For the U.S., we’re just a little bit over the one-year anniversary of our first cases,” Dr. Kenneth Tyler told Yahoo Finance. “When you start to talk about potential longer-term [effects] and what’s their natural history, you’ve got to realize we’re really in early days here and that some things may not be apparent for a while now.”

Yahoo! Finance, May 5, 2021
Dr. David Beckham Highly Contagious Brazilian COVID Variant Confirmed in El Paso County

The variant, first discovered in Brazil, is more likely to reinfect people who have already had COVID-19 compared to the original virus, said Dr. David Beckham, Associate Professor of Infectious Disease and Neurology at the University of Colorado.

Colorado Springs Gazette, May 4, 2021
Dr. Douglas Ney Optune Device Extends Life Expectancy of Littleton Man with Brain Cancer

“It’s an amazing technology,” said Dr. Doug Ney, Neuro-Oncologist at the CU Cancer Center. He says Optune produces alternating electrical fields that target dividing cancer cells in the brain. “They’re not allowed to grow. It sort of stops them in their tracks and then they die.”

CBS4, Apr. 30, 2021
Peter Pressman, MD Five-Minute Digital Clock Test May Speed Early Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

In an accompanying editorial, co-author Dr. Peter Pressman notes that in this “technological advance of the time-honored clock-drawing test, the use of a computerized pen allows analysis not only of the correctness of the face and hands of the clock but also of other, subtler features, such as movement and spatial patterns, thereby providing a much richer dataset than the conventional clock-drawing scoring schema.”

Medscape, Apr. 16, 2021
David Beckham, MD

Variant Cases Now Make Up More Than Half of New Colorado Covid-19 Cases

“The important part of tracking variants is to understand what variants are circulating, which ones are taking over. We know that this happens, all these viruses do this. Eventually, a variant takes over, it’s called a ‘replacement strain,’” said Dr. David Beckham, infectious disease physician, virologist and associate professor of medicine and neurology at CU School of Medicine.

9News, Apr. 14, 2021
David Beckham, MD

To Defeat a Foe Like Parkinson’s, We Must Expose Its Secrets

This was a wake-up call to yet another possible nefarious side-effect of the virus. In a commentary examining the findings, Van Andel Institute’s Dr. Patrik Brundin, along with Dr. Avindra Nath of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Dr. J. David Beckham of University of Colorado, said the cases suggest that COVID-19 may be part of a “perfect storm” for Parkinson’s disease.

Grand Rapids Business Journal, Apr. 2, 2021
Potter, Huntington_web

Cognition Help for Alzheimer’s Patients
Drug Used in Cancer Patients Might Help Treat Alzheimer's

A new study from the CU Alzheimer's and Cognition Center presents evidence that Sargramostim (GM-CSF) is the first drug to show improvement in Alzheimer's patients in a phase II clinical trial. Sargramostim (GM-CSF) is a safe and well-tolerated medication and has 30 years of FDA-approved safe use for other disorders. “These results suggest that short-term Sargramostim treatment leads to innate immune system activation, cognition and memory improvement, and partial normalization of blood measures of amyloid and tau pathology and neuronal damage in participants with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Huntington Potter.

CU Anschutz Today, Mar. 25, 2021
U.S.News & World Report, Mar. 25, 2021

Robert Kowalski, MD Time to Rethink Prognosis After Prolonged Unconsciousness?

“The results of our study, we think, show that caution is warranted in making decisions to withdraw or hold care in patients with these serious brain injuries,” according to lead author Dr. Robert G. Kowalski, Department of Neurology. “A meaningful recovery is possible, even when loss of consciousness occurs after the brain injury."

Medscape, March 4, 2021
Dr. Kenneth Tyler Loss of Smell Lingers Post COVID
 
Also commenting for Medscape Medical News, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Professor of Neurology and a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, said the study was relatively large and the results “interesting.” Although it “provides more evidence there’s a subset of patients with symptoms even well past the acute phase” of COVID, the results are “mostly confirmatory” and include “nothing super surprising,” said Tyler.
 
Medscape, Feb. 23, 2021
Pressman, Peter Writing Styles Linked to Alzheimer’s Development Later in Life
 
“Certain words that we use every day in speech, like: ‘a’, ‘and’ – short little words began to fade away, drop out, as speech became more simple over time in writing,” said Dr. Peter Pressman, Assistant Professor of Neurology.
 
Fox31, Feb. 11, 2021
Nagel, Maria Coronavirus May Infect Key Brain Cells, Causing Neurons To Die

Given the stark differences between each arm of the study, “I think it is difficult to compare the mild disease portion of the study to the severe disease cohort,” said Dr. Maria Nagel, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.

MSN, Feb. 10, 2021
Tyler_Kenneth1 CU Anschutz Experts Break COVID-19 Effects Down by Body Part

From foggy mind to ‘COVID toe,’ observations abound, but causal evidence still lags. Dr. Kenneth Tyler addresses impacts to the Central Nervous System.

CU Anschutz Today, Jan. 27, 2021
Maureen Leehey, MD What You Need to Know About CBD Side Effects

CBD that you buy at the drugstore and CBD you get at a medical marijuana dispensary are not the same either, which means the side effects could be different, points out Dr. Maureen Leehey, Director of the Movement Disorders Center at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

HealthCentral, Jan. 25, 2021
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website Pasadena Library’s STEAM Program Illustrates the Strength of Soap Against Viruses

Dr. Daniel Pastula, neuro-infectious disease expert at UCHealth, the University of Colorado’s non-profit health care system, says soap – even the cheap generic kind – actually works better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus.

Pasadena Now, Jan. 16, 2021
Tyler, Ken_outside

How Long After a COVID Diagnosis Should I Get Vaccinated? Neurovirologists Address This and Other Uncharted Scenarios on the COVID Vaccine

“At a minimum, infected individuals should wait until they are asymptomatic and have completed their quarantine/isolation period for approximately 14 days,” advised Dr. Kenneth L. Tyler, the Louise Baum Endowed Chair of Neurology.

Neurology Today
, Jan. 16, 2021


Faculty Article
Tyler_Kenneth1 CU Anschutz Experts Break COVID-19 Effects Down by Body Part

From foggy mind to ‘COVID toe,’ observations abound, but causal evidence still lags. Dr. Kenneth Tyler addresses impacts to the Central Nervous System.

CU Anschutz Today, Jan. 27, 2021
Maureen Leehey, MD What You Need to Know About CBD Side Effects

CBD that you buy at the drugstore and CBD you get at a medical marijuana dispensary are not the same either, which means the side effects could be different, points out Dr. Maureen Leehey, Director of the Movement Disorders Center at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

HealthCentral, Jan. 25, 2021
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website Pasadena Library’s STEAM Program Illustrates the Strength of Soap Against Viruses

Dr. Daniel Pastula, neuro-infectious disease expert at UCHealth, the University of Colorado’s non-profit health care system, says soap – even the cheap generic kind – actually works better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus.

Pasadena Now, Jan. 16, 2021
Tyler, Ken_outside

How Long After a COVID Diagnosis Should I Get Vaccinated? Neurovirologists Address This and Other Uncharted Scenarios on the COVID Vaccine

“At a minimum, infected individuals should wait until they are asymptomatic and have completed their quarantine/isolation period for approximately 14 days,” advised Dr. Kenneth L. Tyler, the Louise Baum Endowed Chair of Neurology.

Neurology Today
, Jan. 16, 2021

Dr. Drew Kern DBS for Parkinson’s: Nothing Short of a ‘Miracle’ for Young Rocket Scientist

At 35, he had a wife, three young children – and Parkinson’s. Under the care of Dr. Drew Kern and team, Deep Brain Stimulation helped this young rocket scientist overcome a perpetual "fog." Now, he is laughing and playing with his children again.

UCHealth Today, Dec. 23, 2020
Kenneth Tyler, MD COVID-19 Neurologic Fallout Not Limited to the Severely Ill

Commenting on the findings, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Chair of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, noted that this is one of the larger series published to date of the neurologic complications associated with COVID-19, and the first to come from a U.S. safety-net hospital in a large metropolitan area.

Medscape, Dec. 14, 2020
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website Washington Ski Resorts Opening with Covid Rules

Dr. Daniel Pastula said the outdoor element of ski trips is generally safe during a pandemic, but the virus could spread if people congregate in places such as lift lines, lodges, restaurants and bathrooms.

MyNorthwest, Nov. 26, 2020
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website Coloradans Turning to Air Purifiers as Covid Fighting Tool

“Air purifiers with a HEPA filter we think are probably helpful in a lot of situations,” said Dr. Daniel Pastula, Neuroinfectious Disease Physician with UCHealth.

Fox31, Nov. 26, 2020
Leppert, Michelle.2 Incidence of Stroke, But Not MI, Increasing in Young People

“It has been a mystery why the number of strokes in young adults has been growing,” Dr. Michelle Leppert, Assistant Professor of Neurology, told Medscape Medical News. “This is a trend seen worldwide.”

Medscape, Nov. 26, 2020
Dr. John Corboy The Jury Is Still Out on COVID-19 Risk for Patients With MS

Patients with multiple sclerosis may not have an increased risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019, but their risks and outcomes are the targets of ongoing investigation, explained Dr. John Corboy, Professor of Neurology and co-director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center at Anschutz Medical Campus.

AJMC, Nov. 23, 2020
Dr. Mark Spitz Free from epileptic seizures after 33 years

Clay Phillips, a patient of epileptologist Dr. Mark Spitz, suffered for more than three decades. Then, thanks to medical advances and a breakthrough cure, he is living and driving again.

UCHealth Today, Nov. 18, 2020
WicklundMatthew

CU Joins Trial Network Taking Aim at Rare Disease

The University of Colorado is one of four sites recently named to join a research consortium dedicated to finding treatments for a rare, debilitating neuromuscular disease called facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, or FSHD. Dr. Matthew Wicklund, director of the Neuromuscular Section of the UCHealth Neurosciences Center, says FSHD patients in Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region will benefit from CU joining the Clinical Trial Research Network.

UCHealth Today, Nov. 12, 2020

Holden, Samantha More Coloradans Are Dying From Alzheimer’s Disease During Pandemic As Social Isolation Takes Its Toll

Alzheimer’s and dementia often progress slowly over a period of years, but if a person’s brain is stressed, they can experience “dips” and will have a harder time bouncing back than someone without a cognitive disorder, said Dr. Samantha Holden, Medical Director of the CU School of Medicine’s Neurobehavior and Memory Disorders Clinic.

Denver Post, Nov. 1, 2020
Pellinen, Jacob Delayed Diagnosis of Focal Nonmotor Seizures Represents ‘Significant Treatment Gap’

“This research was prompted by a clinical observation that many patients with focal epilepsy experience delays to diagnosis,” Dr. Jacob Pellinen, Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told Healio Neurology.

Healio, Oct. 29, 2020
Pellinen, Jacob Car Accidents Common with Undetected Epilepsy

Among 246 focal epilepsy patients with subtle, non-motor seizures, median time to diagnosis from their first reported seizure was 616 days, reported Dr. Jacob Pellinen of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and co-authors. Subtle seizures may include brief hallucinations or déjà vu.

MedPage Today, Oct. 20, 2020
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website

U.S. Resorts Adapt to New Normal of Skiing Amid Pandemic


Dr. Daniel Pastula, CU School of Medicine Neuroinfectious Disease physician, said the outdoor element of ski trips is generally safe during a pandemic, but the virus could spread if people congregate in places such as lift lines, lodges, restaurants and bathrooms. “I think you can ski smartly and safely. Again, not completely eliminating the risk, but really reducing it,” he said.

Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 17, 2020
JohnCorboy Why Disease-Modifying Therapy Efficacy Varies With Age

Immunopathology changes with age, so older individuals with multiple sclerosis need medications that focus on effects inside the nervous system, explained Dr. John Corboy, Professor of Neurology and Co-director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center.

American Journal of Managed Care, Oct. 9, 2020
Potter, Huntington_web

Promising Alzheimer’s Trials, Treatments in Process, and Potential Therapy Link to COVID-19

“We proposed in a paper published in F1000 that GM-CSF Leukine would be a treatment for COVID-19. The idea was based on some preliminary work with Dr. Ken Tyler's lab showing that GM-CSF prevented the death of mice infected with West Nile Virus,” reported Dr. Huntington Potter. “We made a leap to suggest…that this natural protein might be a treatment for COVID-19. And there are now at least two clinical trials being carried out with GM-CSF treatment for COVID-19, one in Belgium and one in Singapore. One would never necessarily have thought that all of our work on Alzheimer's disease would give us an insight into how to treat COVID-19, but it did. That's one of the reasons it's so great to be in a university setting where ideas can be tested by essentially moving to the fifth floor from the fourth floor of our research building.”

CU Anschutz Today, Sept. 30, 2020

Dr. Michelle Leppert Young Women May Face Greater Stroke Risk Than Young Men

“We have this sense of security that women don’t have as many strokes because estrogen in premenopausal women can be protective for cardiovascular events, but that’s a false assumption,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Michelle Leppert, assistant professor of neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Herald Review (Big Rapids, Mich.), Sept. 18, 2020
Dr. Maria Nagel The New Coronavirus Can Infect Brain Cells, Study Finds

“This study is the first to do an extensive analysis of SARS-CoV-2 [brain] infection using three models,” said Dr. Maria Nagel, professor of neurology and ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.

LiveScience, Sept. 13, 2020
Dr. John Corboy Research About Stopping Disease-Modifying Therapies for MS

Do patients with multiple sclerosis who have been on disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for decades need to keep taking them? Dr. John Corboy, professor of neurology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, and co-director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center at Anschutz Medical Campus, explains what is known about this area.

AJMC, Sept. 12, 2020

Dr. Huntington Potter

Dr. Peter Pressman

The Aging Brain: Exploring the Connection Between Neurology and Elevation

When it comes to looking at the potential correlation between living at high elevation and the risk for dementia-inducing diseases, Drs. Huntington Potter and Peter Pressman of the Alzheimer’s and Cognition Center said it would take great effort, time and funding to research.

Summit Daily News, Sept. 10, 2020
PelakVictoriaWeb Long After the Fire of a Covid-19 Infection, Mental and Neurological Effects Can Still Smolder

“It’s sort of like you’re trying to put out the fire and then a little bit later, you go look at  the nervous system as the embers,” said Dr. Victoria Pelak, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology. “Because you are so concerned with the raging fire, you haven’t really been able to pay attention to the nervous system as much as you normally would.”

STAT, Aug. 12, 2020

Restrepo, Diego PhD

Nagel, Maria

CU Anschutz Researchers Win NIH Grant to Study COVID-19 Impact on Sense of Smell

“The virus often starts in the nose before making its way to the lungs,” said Diego Restrepo, PhD, Professor of cell and developmental biology, who will co-investigate with Maria Nagel, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology. “We think this may spark an inflammatory response that releases cytokines which in turn silence olfactory sensory neurons in the nose.”

CU Anschutz Today, July 21, 2020
Tyler Kenneth, MD, Chair, Department of Neurology Three Stages to COVID-19 Brain Damage, New Review Suggests

Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, disagreed that all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 should routinely receive an MRI. “Whenever you are using a piece of equipment on patients who are COVID-19 infected, you risk introducing the infection to uninfected patients."

Medscape, June 29, 2020
Dr. Maureen Leehey Does the Immune System Play a Role in Parkinson's Disease?

“It has long been suspected that immune alterations are an important part of the development of PD,” says Dr. Maureen Leehey, Professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Health Central, June 8, 2020
Dr. Daniel Pastula What to Know Before Heading to an Open Beach This Summer

“It’s really the close contact with people – whether in the water or on land – that’s the concern,” Dr. Daniel Pastula, neuro-infectious disease expert and Associate Professor of Neurology, said in a recent report by UCHealth.

Newsweek, May 22, 2020
Dr. Ken Tyler COVID 19: What Other Respiratory Viruses Can Reveal About Neurologic Symptoms

Kenneth L. Tyler, Louise Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, said he tends to think of the potential neurologic impacts of CoV-2 as falling into one of three broad categories.

Neurology Today, May 21, 2020

Inflamed brains, toe rashes, strokes: Why COVID-19’s weirdest symptoms are only emerging now

“Almost all the [neurological] things we’re seeing now with COVID-19 are things you might have predicted would have happened,” says Kenneth Tyler, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

National Geographic, May 21, 2020
Dr. Christina Vaughan Neuropalliative Care During COVID-19 – How Clinicians Help Patients and Families Cope with Isolation, Fear, and Life-Limiting Illness

“It’s like a modern version of an old-fashioned home visit,” said Christina L. Vaughan, associate professor and chief of the division of neuropalliative care in the department of neurology at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus. “This has really sparked a lot of conversation. So much of palliative care is understanding someone’s story and what is important to them.”

Neurology Today, May 18, 2020

Piquet, Amanda

Holden, Samantha


The COVID-19 Life: On Juggling Young Children and Telemedicine

Amanda L. Piquet, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said it was after the first day that the five weeks of “stay-at-home” restrictions had been lifted that she realized she really needed a vacation. Dr. Piquet, who has a 4-year-old and an 8-month-old child, is a neurohospitalist and works part-time in the hospital where she has inpatient duties.

Samantha K. Holden, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, encountered her first work-family challenge during her first week of full-time telemedicine at home. Dr. Holden had asked an older patient to walk around his room so she could examine his gait—when all of a sudden, a little 4-year-old face appeared behind her on the screen.

Neurology Today, May 5, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

Coronavirus in Context: Neurological Effects of COVID-19

Coronavirus in Context Video Series, with WebMD’s Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, MPH, who discusses neurological effects of COVID-19 with Kenneth Tyler, department chair of neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine.

WebMD, May 5, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

The Great Invader: How COVID-19 Attacks Every Organ

The brain and nerves may also fall prey to direct attack. Dr. Kenmeth Tyler, Chair of the Department of Neurology, cautions that direct central nervous system (CNS) attack is still being worked out at this time. There are many routes a virus could take to invade the CNS.

Medscape, April 23, 2020

 

Dr. Ken Tyler

Do coronavirus symptoms include a ‘fizzing,’ tingling or burning sensation?

Other coronaviruses that affect humans can invade the central nervous system, so it makes sense COVID-19 may have neurologic manifestations, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, told  Neurology Today, a publication of the American Academy of Neurology.

Neurology Today, April 13, 2020

Dr. Michelle Leppert

An unintended, yet still dangerous, COVID-19 impact: Those with life-threatening illness avoiding ER

 

“Time is really of the essence,” said Dr. Michelle Leppert, Assistant Professor of Neurology, who treated a stroke patient. “This was true before COVID. And the faster we can get a patient seen and get care to them, the better the outcome is.”

Channel 7, April 14, 2020

Dr. Daniel Pastula

Why Do Some People Get Sicker?

Infectious disease expert Dr. Daniel Pastula says viral dose could matter — a lot. “The lower the viral dose that you may get, we do think that there’s a better chance for your immune system to recognize what’s going on and fight it off before it causes problems,” he told CBS4’s Alan Gionet.

CBS4, April 7, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

The Spread of COVID-19: Questions Raised, Some Answered by Neuroinfectious Disease Experts

Kenneth L. Tyler, Louis Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, noted that earlier this year a report from three COVID-19-designated hospitals in Wuhan, China, indicated that more than one-third of coronavirus patients had some type of neurologic symptom, including altered consciousness, evidence of skeletal muscle damage, and acute cerebrovascular disease.

Neurology Today, April 2, 2020

Dr. Daniel Pastula

Why soap and water work better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus.

Good, old-fashioned soap, even if it’s the cheap, generic kind, works better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus. It’s all about chemistry, says Dr. Daniel Pastula.

UCHealth Today, March 30, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

What Neurologists Can Expect from COVID-19

Medscape recently spoke with central nervous system infection specialist and chair of University of Colorado's neurology department, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, about what implications the new coronavirus could have on patients and practice.

Medscape, March 26, 2020

Dr. Dan Pastula

Coronavirus: Why has COVID-19 caused so many deaths worldwide? Your risk revealed

Dr. Daniel Pastula, UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and CU School of Medicine, explained how the virus could easily infect the human body, as we have no pre-existing defences against it, adding: “Our bodies don’t immediately recognise it as a dangerous intruder.”

Express (London), March 20, 2020

Dr. Samantha Holden

Dementia has no cure, but researchers and caregivers have found ways to improve quality of life

“I get about 90-95 percent of my diagnosis from talking to them, getting to know them,” Dr. Samantha Holden, a behavioral neurologist with University of Colorado Health and Assistant Professor of neurology at CU School of Medicine, said. “Even though we can’t cure these things, we can definitely manage them and make sure we’re improving people’s quality of life.”

Channel 7, March 20, 2020

Dr. Daniel Pastula

Colorado governor closes bars, restaurants, theaters and gyms in fight against coronavirus

Hospitals in mountain communities, where the virus is spreading more widely, already are running short of protective gear and other resources to care for a higher volume of patients, said Dr. Daniel Pastula, a University of Colorado School of Medicine infectious disease specialist who visited some of the harder-hit communities.

Denver Post, March 16, 2020

Dr. Timothy Vollmer

8 Early Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis Women in Their 20s and 30s Should Know

Typically, MS follows a classic relapse/remission pattern. “You get this burst of inflammation in a spot in the brain, and the inflammation runs its course,” Dr. Timothy Vollmer, a neurologist at the University of Colorado who specializes in multiple sclerosis, tells SELF. After this “attack,” you then “recover,” and the symptoms retreat for a time period until the next attack.

Self, March 1, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Diagnostic Criteria Don’t Predict Treatment Response. Does the Disorder Actually Exist?

The study “raises the question of whether there is such a thing as HE,” commented Kenneth L. Tyler, Louise Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “There aren't any validated diagnostic criteria, and the breadth of clinical presentations and lab criteria across patients labeled with it is pretty broad.”

Neurology Today, Feb 20, 2020

Dr. Benzi Kluger

Outpatient Palliative Care Improves Parkinson Outcomes

As reported in the February 10, 2020 issue of JAMA Neurology, Dr. Benzi Kluger and School of Medicine colleagues evaluated whether outpatient palliative care is associated with improvements in patient-centered outcomes compared with standard care among 210 patients with Parkinson disease and related disorders and 175 caregivers.

Physician’s Weekly, Feb 10, 2020

Dr. Cornelia Drees

From epilepsy nightmare to 'Neuro Ninja'

Kyle Parker convulsed so violently he broke his back in four places. Then he opted for an innovative brain surgery and he’s 100% seizure free. Cornelia Drees, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology, describes the laser ablation surgery that ended Kyle's unpredictable seizures.

UCHealth Today, Jan. 22, 2020

Dr. Ken Tyler

Healthy babies exposed to Zika in the womb may suffer developmental delays

Because there was variability between individuals, “looking at a population enables one to see overall trends,” says neurologist Ken Tyler, MD, Professor and Chair of Neurology of the CU School of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. “We need to aggressively follow all children whose mothers were exposed to Zika during pregnancy to understand the nature of their neurological delays.”

Science News, Jan. 6, 2020

 

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