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Restrepo, Diego PhD

Nagel, Maria

CU Anschutz Researchers Win NIH Grant to Study COVID-19 Impact on Sense of Smell

“The virus often starts in the nose before making its way to the lungs,” said Diego Restrepo, PhD, Professor of cell and developmental biology, who will co-investigate with Maria Nagel, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology. “We think this may spark an inflammatory response that releases cytokines which in turn silence olfactory sensory neurons in the nose.”

CU Anschutz Today, July 21, 2020
Tyler Kenneth, MD, Chair, Department of Neurology Three Stages to COVID-19 Brain Damage, New Review Suggests

Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, disagreed that all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 should routinely receive an MRI. “Whenever you are using a piece of equipment on patients who are COVID-19 infected, you risk introducing the infection to uninfected patients."

Medscape, June 29, 2020
MaureenLeeheyDoes the Immune System Play a Role in Parkinson's Disease?

“It has long been suspected that immune alterations are an important part of the development of PD,” says Dr. Maureen Leehey, Professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Health Central, June 8, 2020
Pastula_Dec 2018_Website What to Know Before Heading to an Open Beach This Summer

“It’s really the close contact with people – whether in the water or on land – that’s the concern,” Dr. Daniel Pastula, neuro-infectious disease expert and Associate Professor of Neurology, said in a recent report by UCHealth.

Newsweek, May 22, 2020
Tyler Ken Desk COVID 19: What Other Respiratory Viruses Can Reveal About Neurologic Symptoms

Kenneth L. Tyler, Louise Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, said he tends to think of the potential neurologic impacts of CoV-2 as falling into one of three broad categories.

Neurology Today, May 21, 2020

Inflamed brains, toe rashes, strokes: Why COVID-19’s weirdest symptoms are only emerging now

“Almost all the [neurological] things we’re seeing now with COVID-19 are things you might have predicted would have happened,” says Kenneth Tyler, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

National Geographic, May 21, 2020
Vaughan, Christina_08.08.17 Neuropalliative Care During COVID-19 – How Clinicians Help Patients and Families Cope with Isolation, Fear, and Life-Limiting Illness

“It’s like a modern version of an old-fashioned home visit,” said Christina L. Vaughan, associate professor and chief of the division of neuropalliative care in the department of neurology at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus. “This has really sparked a lot of conversation. So much of palliative care is understanding someone’s story and what is important to them.”

Neurology Today, May 18, 2020

Piquet, Amanda

Holden, Samantha


The COVID-19 Life: On Juggling Young Children and Telemedicine

Amanda L. Piquet, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said it was after the first day that the five weeks of “stay-at-home” restrictions had been lifted that she realized she really needed a vacation. Dr. Piquet, who has a 4-year-old and an 8-month-old child, is a neurohospitalist and works part-time in the hospital where she has inpatient duties.

Samantha K. Holden, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, encountered her first work-family challenge during her first week of full-time telemedicine at home. Dr. Holden had asked an older patient to walk around his room so she could examine his gait—when all of a sudden, a little 4-year-old face appeared behind her on the screen.

Neurology Today, May 5, 2020

Tyler_Kenneth1

Coronavirus in Context: Neurological Effects of COVID-19

Coronavirus in Context Video Series, with WebMD’s Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, MPH, who discusses neurological effects of COVID-19 with Kenneth Tyler, department chair of neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine.

WebMD, May 5, 2020

Tyler_Kenneth1

The Great Invader: How COVID-19 Attacks Every Organ

The brain and nerves may also fall prey to direct attack. Dr. Kenmeth Tyler, Chair of the Department of Neurology, cautions that direct central nervous system (CNS) attack is still being worked out at this time. There are many routes a virus could take to invade the CNS.

Medscape, April 23, 2020

 

Tyler_Kenneth1

Do coronavirus symptoms include a ‘fizzing,’ tingling or burning sensation?

Other coronaviruses that affect humans can invade the central nervous system, so it makes sense COVID-19 may have neurologic manifestations, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, told  Neurology Today, a publication of the American Academy of Neurology.

Neurology Today, April 13, 2020

Michelle,Leppert

An unintended, yet still dangerous, COVID-19 impact: Those with life-threatening illness avoiding ER

 

“Time is really of the essence,” said Dr. Michelle Leppert, Assistant Professor of Neurology, who treated a stroke patient. “This was true before COVID. And the faster we can get a patient seen and get care to them, the better the outcome is.”

Channel 7, April 14, 2020

Pastula_Dec 2018_Website

Why Do Some People Get Sicker?

Infectious disease expert Dr. Daniel Pastula says viral dose could matter — a lot. “The lower the viral dose that you may get, we do think that there’s a better chance for your immune system to recognize what’s going on and fight it off before it causes problems,” he told CBS4’s Alan Gionet.

CBS4, April 7, 2020

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The Spread of COVID-19: Questions Raised, Some Answered by Neuroinfectious Disease Experts

Kenneth L. Tyler, Louis Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, noted that earlier this year a report from three COVID-19-designated hospitals in Wuhan, China, indicated that more than one-third of coronavirus patients had some type of neurologic symptom, including altered consciousness, evidence of skeletal muscle damage, and acute cerebrovascular disease.

Neurology Today, April 2, 2020

Pastula_Dec 2018_Website

Why soap and water work better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus.

Good, old-fashioned soap, even if it’s the cheap, generic kind, works better than hand sanitizer to remove the coronavirus. It’s all about chemistry, says Dr. Daniel Pastula.

UCHealth Today, March 30, 2020

Tyler_Kenneth1

What Neurologists Can Expect from COVID-19

Medscape recently spoke with central nervous system infection specialist and chair of University of Colorado's neurology department, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, about what implications the new coronavirus could have on patients and practice.

Medscape, March 26, 2020

Pastula_Dec 2018_Website

Coronavirus: Why has COVID-19 caused so many deaths worldwide? Your risk revealed

Dr. Daniel Pastula, UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and CU School of Medicine, explained how the virus could easily infect the human body, as we have no pre-existing defences against it, adding: “Our bodies don’t immediately recognise it as a dangerous intruder.”

Express (London), March 20, 2020

samantha-holden

Dementia has no cure, but researchers and caregivers have found ways to improve quality of life

“I get about 90-95 percent of my diagnosis from talking to them, getting to know them,” Dr. Samantha Holden, a behavioral neurologist with University of Colorado Health and Assistant Professor of neurology at CU School of Medicine, said. “Even though we can’t cure these things, we can definitely manage them and make sure we’re improving people’s quality of life.”

Channel 7, March 20, 2020

Pastula_Dec 2018_Website

Colorado governor closes bars, restaurants, theaters and gyms in fight against coronavirus

Hospitals in mountain communities, where the virus is spreading more widely, already are running short of protective gear and other resources to care for a higher volume of patients, said Dr. Daniel Pastula, a University of Colorado School of Medicine infectious disease specialist who visited some of the harder-hit communities.

Denver Post, March 16, 2020

tim-vollumer

8 Early Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis Women in Their 20s and 30s Should Know

Typically, MS follows a classic relapse/remission pattern. “You get this burst of inflammation in a spot in the brain, and the inflammation runs its course,” Dr. Timothy Vollmer, a neurologist at the University of Colorado who specializes in multiple sclerosis, tells SELF. After this “attack,” you then “recover,” and the symptoms retreat for a time period until the next attack.

Self, March 1, 2020

Tyler_Kenneth1

Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Diagnostic Criteria Don’t Predict Treatment Response. Does the Disorder Actually Exist?

The study “raises the question of whether there is such a thing as HE,” commented Kenneth L. Tyler, Louise Baum Endowed Professor and Chair of Neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “There aren't any validated diagnostic criteria, and the breadth of clinical presentations and lab criteria across patients labeled with it is pretty broad.”

Neurology Today, Feb 20, 2020

benzi-kluger

Outpatient Palliative Care Improves Parkinson Outcomes

As reported in the February 10, 2020 issue of JAMA Neurology, Dr. Benzi Kluger and School of Medicine colleagues evaluated whether outpatient palliative care is associated with improvements in patient-centered outcomes compared with standard care among 210 patients with Parkinson disease and related disorders and 175 caregivers.

Physician’s Weekly, Feb 10, 2020

cornelia-drees

From epilepsy nightmare to 'Neuro Ninja'

Kyle Parker convulsed so violently he broke his back in four places. Then he opted for an innovative brain surgery and he’s 100% seizure free. Cornelia Drees, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology, describes the laser ablation surgery that ended Kyle's unpredictable seizures.

UCHealth Today, Jan. 22, 2020

Tyler_Kenneth1

Healthy babies exposed to Zika in the womb may suffer developmental delays

Because there was variability between individuals, “looking at a population enables one to see overall trends,” says neurologist Ken Tyler, MD, Professor and Chair of Neurology of the CU School of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. “We need to aggressively follow all children whose mothers were exposed to Zika during pregnancy to understand the nature of their neurological delays.”

Science News, Jan. 6, 2020

 

FacultyArticle

Antibody Monotherapy Shows Promise in Neuromyelitis Optical

 

“This is a disease based on attacks, and you’re doing well before you’re not,” lead author Jeffrey L. Bennett, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology at the CU School of Medicine, said. “As investigators and clinicians, we will have to look at what is best for patients — as to whether concurrent therapy is better than monotherapy in the early phase of the disease.”

 

Medscape, September 12, 2019

Massachusetts Race Postponed Due to Rare Mosquito-Borne Virus. Should You Worry?

 

 

However, EEE (Eastern equine encephalitis) infections are fairly rare, Dr. Daniel Pastula, Associate Professor of Neurology, Infectious Diseases, and Epidemiology at the CU School of Medicine, told Runner’s World. “Most people who are infected are completely asymptomatic. They will never know [they contracted EEE],” Pastula said. “Those who become symptomatic, they are a different story.”

 

Runner’s World, September 6, 2019

Study explores blood-brain barrier leakage in CNS infections

 

“Gene expression studies on brain material from infected mice suggested that one of the pathways that was really upregulated during infection was interferon signaling in general, and in particular, a subset of interferon, the type 2 interferon or interferon gamma,” said study investigator Kenneth Tyler, MD, a neurovirologist and Chairman of the Department of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine.

 

Medical Xpress, August 6, 2019

Palliative Care for MS: What It Is, When It’s Helpful

 

“The way I explain it is looking at ‘disease-centered’ versus ‘person-centered’ care,” says Dr. Benzi Kluger, a neuropalliative care specialist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and professor of neurology at the CU School of Medicine. “In disease-centered care, the primary focus will always be on the patient, meaning a person defined by their illness. Whereas in palliative care, the primary focus is on people who can define their illness” and what’s important to them — including not just the patient, but also family members and any caregivers."

 

Everyday Health, August 5, 2019

Colorado woman who had a stroke at 26 defies odds in recovery

 

“There really isn’t a youngest age cutoff where you can’t have a stroke below that age because we can see strokes across the entire age spectrum,” UCHealth stroke neurologist and Associate Professor of Neurology at CU School of Medicine, Dr. Sharon Poisson, told FOX31.

 

Fox31, July 23, 2019

Alzheimer’s research is getting a reboot at small companies focused on the immune system

 

“This is really a completely different approach than anything that has been tried before,” said Dr. Huntington Potter, Director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center. “It is one approach of many, and we’re hopeful. But science will tell.”

 

Washington Post, July 3, 2019

How Video Games Change the Brain

 

Pearce Korb, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology: “In a 2018 survey from the Entertainment Software Association, 64% of US households reported having a video gaming device. It’s definitely not just for children anymore, as the average age of gamers was 36 among women—who comprised 45% of those polled—and 32 among men.”

 

Medscape, May 21, 2019

Mobile Stroke Units Can Make a Difference When Time Is Critical

 

Dr. Sharon Poisson, a stroke neurologist with UCHealth: “This is our mobile stroke treatment unit and on this unit we have a CT scanner, which is really different than most ambulances. This allows us to do rapid imaging of patients’ heads to see if there’s a bleeding stroke or anything else causing their symptoms.”

 

9News, March 5, 2019

Denver to Host Experts to Talk Medical Marijuana & Parkinson’s Disease

 

“To date, there is more hype than actual data to provide meaningful clinical information to patients with PD,” said Dr. Benzi Kluger, co-chair of the conference and Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine. “There is a critical need to analyze existing data on medical marijuana and to set priorities for future research.”

 

CBS4, March 5, 2019

Neurologist Discusses Warning Signs of a Stroke

 

UCHealth neurologist and Assistant Professor of Neurology at CU School of Medicine, Dr. Michelle Leppert: “The average age for a stroke in America is about 65 years old, so 52 years is definitely very young for having a stroke. Unfortunately, as we’re doing better treating strokes in older adults, we seeing more and more strokes in younger Americans.”

 

9News, March 4, 2019

UCHealth Doctors Using Mobile Stroke Unit to Begin Treating Strokes in the Ambulance

 

According to Dr. William Jones, Medical Director of the Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit at UCHealth and Associate Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine, the stroke unit in UCHealth’s system is one of only about twenty worldwide.

 

Fox31, March 4, 2019

With its burning grip, shingles can do lasting damage

 

Following an appointment with Dr. Maria Nagel, CU School of Medicine neurologist, Ms. Hartman was admitted to the University’s hospital to get another antiviral drug intravenously. The pain subsided, and Hartman regained her hearing and the feeling in her face. “The dormant virus in the body “is like a needle [in] a huge haystack,” added neurovirologist colleague, Dr. Randall Cohrs. “That needle can reactivate and wreak so much havoc.”

 

Science News, Feb 26, 2019

Atherosclerotic risk factors increase as patients age

 

“[Atherosclerotic risk factors] are very rare in children, including in those with strokes,” wrote Dr. Sharon N. Poisson, Associate Professor, Co-director of Stroke Services and Director of the Vascular Neurology Fellowship in the Department of Neurology at CU School of Medicine, and colleagues.

 

Healio, Feb 21, 2019

WATCH: The Denver Post’s Understanding Alzheimer’s panel conversation

 

Panelists included: Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, clinical director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center at CU Anschutz and clinical director of the Memory Disorders Clinic with UCHealth and Dr. Hillary Lum, a geriatrician and palliative care physician at the Seniors Clinic at University of Colorado Hospital, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and the VA Eastern Colorado Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center.

 

Denver Post , Feb 7, 2019

Greeley family wonders who’s next as they watch Alzheimer’s disease wind through its generations

 

“Obviously, a family that has two parents with Alzheimer’s disease is facing this kind of problem in a double way,” Dr. Huntington Potter, director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center (RMADC) at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, says of the emotional and financial toll that the disorder has on families. “It’s bad enough having one parent.” Doctors often don’t perform genetic tests for Alzheimer’s because “we just don’t find that it’s very predictive,” says Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, clinical director of the RMADC.

 

Denver Post , Jan. 29, 2019

As Alzheimer’s disease preys on a Colorado family, dad fights while mom accepts her fate

 

Studies have shown that marijuana can reduce aggression and anxiety, but there are no signs that it can reduce Alzheimer’s disease itself, says Huntington Potter, PhD, director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center at the CU School of Medicine.

 

Denver Post , Jan. 28, 2019

Alzheimer’s disease creeps from one generation to the next in this Colorado family

 

Whether a couple get the disease at the same time or one after another is “the luck of the draw,” says Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, clinical director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center at CU Anschutz.

 

Denver Post , Jan. 27, 2019

Mother of Two Survives Rare Polio-Like Illness: ‘I’m Glad It’s Over’

 

MRI scans showed inflammation in both her brain and her spinal cord. “It almost looks like a molar tooth outline,” said Dr. Daniel Pastula pointing to the MRI of Emily’s spine. Pastula is a Neuro-Infectious Disease physician at University of Colorado Hospital and an expert on AFM.

 

CBS4, Jan. 22, 2019

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

 

Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado Stroke and Brain Aneurysm Center, Karen Orjuela, MD, explains the heart-brain team approach to screening cryptogenic stroke patients for transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure.

 

Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology, Jan. 16, 2019

Early Treatment Shows Lower Risk to Secondary Progressive MS

 

“This has been a very large question for some time: Can we really show that earlier use of these disease-modifying therapies actually results in a delay of entry into secondary progressive phase of the illness?” said Dr. John Corboy of the University of Colorado, who was not part of the study.

 

MedPage Today, Jan. 15, 2019

 

FacultyArticle

Medical Marijuana and Its Use Focus of March Meeting Set by Parkinson’s Foundation

 

Benzi Kluger, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology at University of Colorado Hospital and a conference co-chair: “To date, there is more hype than actual data to provide meaningful clinical information to patients with PD. There is a critical need to analyze existing data on medical marijuana and to set priorities for future research.

 

Parkinson’s News Today, Dec. 7, 2018

Colorado Doctors Battle Polio-Like Disease

 

The condition generally presents itself in the immediate wake of a viral infection and according to Dr. Ken Tyler, from the Department of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine, a considerable number of AFM patients test positive for one of two separate enteroviruses, D68 and A71.

 

KGNU, Dec. 4, 2018

 

CDC’s handling of polio-like illness criticized by its own advisers

 

“This is the CDC’s job. This is what they’re supposed to do well. And it’s a source of frustration to many of us that they’re apparently not doing these things,” said Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Professor and Chair of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine and another adviser to the CDC on Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM).

 

CNN, Oct. 30, 2018

The Main Suspect Behind an Ominous Spike in a Polio-like Illness

 

As the summer of 2014 gave way to fall, Dr. Kevin Messacar, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Colorado, started seeing a wave of children with inexplicable paralysis. All of them shared the same story. One day, they had a cold. The next, they couldn’t move an arm or a leg. In some children, the paralysis was relatively mild, but others had to be supported with ventilators and feeding tubes after they stopped being able to breathe or swallow on their own. When the latest AFM wave hit, Children’s Hospital Colorado actually saw it coming. There’s also compelling evidence from laboratory studies. Last year, Alison Hixon at the University of Colorado School of Medicine Tyler Laboratory showed that EV-D68 strains from the 2014 outbreak can paralyze mice by infecting and killing the movement-controlling neurons in their spine.

 

The Atlantic, Oct. 25, 2018

 

CDC says polio-like disease is puzzling. These doctors disagree.

 

“I think we are seeing the emergence of a new polio-like paralytic disease. Its pattern and most of the evidence that we have suggests that it is likely a virally caused disease,” Dr. Ken Tyler, University of Colorado School of Medicine Chair of Neurology, told NBC News. Dr. Kevin Messacar of Children's Hospital Colorado and colleagues similarly found an increase in EV-D68 cases in Colorado in 2016. “One of the things we need to do more of going forward is active surveillance,” Dr. Messacar said.

 

NBC News, Oct. 25, 2018

United States reports new cases of puzzling, poliolike disease that strikes children

 

Lab research has strengthened the case that EV-D68 could be involved. Last year, Dr. Kenneth Tyler of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and his colleagues reported that several strains of EV-D68 could cause paralysis in mice. "The virus seemed to target nerve cells involved in muscle control, which makes the link much more plausible," says Dr. Kevin Messacar, a pediatric infectious disease specialist also at the University who was not involved in the study. "We have a better understanding that this virus is likely causing an active infection in the spinal cord, in the rare cases that it’s causing paralysis. ”

 

Science, Oct. 16, 2018 and Wyoming Public Media, Oct. 17, 2018

 

38 Science-Backed Tricks to Sharpen Your Memory

 

“Research studies show that physical exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, is best for maintaining or improving memory,” Dr. Benzi Kluger, Professor of Neurology, tells Prevention magazine. “Exercise provides significant physical and mental benefits, especially as you age.”

 

Prevention, Oct. 3, 2018

'Incredibles 2’ may cause epileptic seizures. Here’s why.

 

“Some patients with epilepsy have seizures that are triggered by light, specifically flashing light, including strongly contrasted patterns. This is called photosensitive epilepsy, or having photosensitive seizures,” said Dr. Cornelia Drees, a clinical epileptologist at UCHealth.

 

Livestrong, June 22, 2018

CU Anschutz researchers apply for grant to fund further Alzheimer’s research

 

“We are now in a clinical trial with people with Alzheimer’s Disease and the preliminary results look very encouraging,” said Dr. Huntington Potter, Director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center on the CU Anschutz campus.

 

Channel 7, June 27, 2018

Guest Commentary: Let’s talk about how we talk about dementia

 

"However, we will continue to publicly use the simpler name, Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center, because the federal government still refers to organizations like ours as Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers," write Dr. Huntington Potter, Director, and Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, Clinical Director, of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center at the CU School of Medicine.

 

Denver Post, June 1, 2018

Experts question claims stem cells can treat Alzheimer’s disease

 

Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, Associate Professor of Neurology at CU’s Anschutz campus, said there is no proven therapy using stem cells for Alzheimer’s right now. “Alzheimer’s is a very complex disease. It’s been looked at with a number of different hypothetical, theoretical models that have led to various kinds of experimental treatment approaches and none of those have yielded substantial results as yet.”

 

Channel 7, May 18, 2018

Column: The Enigma of Alzheimer’s

 

Dr. Huntington Potter, Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine, says scientists all over the world are trying to understand the mechanism of Alzheimer’s and use that information to develop new drugs. “Several are in clinical trials right now and some look rather promising.”

 

Cody Enterprise, March 21, 2018

This stroke survivor wants his experience to serve as a lesson

 

“He couldn’t move his right side and he wasn’t talking,” said Dr. Jennifer Simpson, a neurologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. “He also had signs that he had a large blood vessel that was blocked inside of his head.”

 

9News, March 18, 2018

The Mystery Of A Polio-Like Illness In Colorado May Be Solved

 

CU researchers say they've identified the likely cause of Acute Flaccid Myelitis, which can cause paralysis, facial drooping and muscle weakness. In 2014, there were more than 100 cases in 34 states, including 12 cases treated at Children’s Hospital Colorado. “As a scientific community we need to take it seriously because of the long-term consequences and potentially disabling consequences of it,” said Dr. Kevin Messacar, a pediatric infectious disease specialist and neurologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado.

 

Colorado Public Radio, March 13, 2018

UCHealth, Ride-Sharing Service Form New Partnership

 

UCHealth is partnering with Uber to make doctor’s visits more accessible — another example of ways that health-care organizations are expanding their scope of care beyond what is provided within the four walls of their facilities. The Aurora-based health system is offering 30 percent discounts on Uber rides to its Front Range hospitals — including the flagship University of Colorado Hospital.

 

Denver Business Journal, March 12, 2018

Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Brings Care to You

 

“Treating people with an acute stroke, time is of the essence,” said Dr. William Jones, medical director of the stroke program at University of Colorado Hospital. He says a few minutes can make all the difference. “We are significantly impacting patients’ recovery and outcome from their stroke.”

 

Fox31, March 8, 2018

Colorado Researchers Home In On Cause Of Mystery Illness

 

“That was one of the mysteries. How does a respiratory virus lead to paralysis?”--paralysis that still hasn’t gone away for many of the 120 patients in the U.S. that came down with symptoms in 2014, says Dr. Kevin Messacar, a pediatric infectious disease specialist and neurologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado.

 

KUNC, Feb. 28, 2018

The Latest News in Alzheimer’s Disease Research

 

“Alzheimer’s disease research at the University of Colorado is both basic laboratory research and clinical research,” explains Dr. Huntington Potter, Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine. “What we’re doing in the laboratory is trying to understand the intricacies of Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, and develop ‘new’ drugs that might help us block certain steps in the disease process.”

 

9News, Feb. 22, 2018

Immune System Implicated Early in Alzheimer’s Disease

 

“One of the two primary goals of our study was to assess the association between inflammatory markers in CSF and plasma to clarify how well plasma inflammatory markers reflect central nervous system inflammation,” said study author Brianne Bettcher, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurology at the CU School of Medicine.

 

Technology Networks, Feb. 6, 2018

Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease Continue to Evolve

 

“We found so far that Leukine is safe in people with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Huntington Potter, Director of Alzheimer’s research at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. “That means it doesn’t have the side effects that so many other Alzheimer’s drugs have had, which are swelling in the brain and bleeding into the brain.”

 

Buffalo Reflex (Buffalo, Mo.), Jan. 27, 2018

FacultyArticle

Colorado Poet’s Brain To Be Used To Study Down Syndrome-Alzheimer’s Link

 

Gretchen Josephson’s family recently donated her brain to the CU School of Medicine. Dr. Huntington Potter, who discovered that the chromosomal abnormality seen in Down Syndrome is also found in people with Alzheimer’s disease, said Josephson’s brain will be used to help develop treatments for people with Alzheimer’s.

 

Colorado Public Radio, Oct. 4, 2017

Should You Take Vitamin B12 to Boost Mood?

 

“We know that B12 deficiency is very bad for the nervous system,” says Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, an associate professor of neurology and psychiatry at the CU School of Medicine.

 

U.S. News & World Report, Sept. 21, 2017

Experts Share Insights on New Developments in Tardive Dyskinesia

 

Dr. Lauren Seeberger, Associate Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine and Director of the Movement Disorders Center at the University of Colorado Hospital: “The development of valbenazine and successful trial work leading to FDA approval to treat tardive dyskinesia is a breakthrough for these patients who have been treated empirically to date.”

 

MD Magazine, September 19, 2017

CO doctors find preliminary results ‘positive’ in early tests of Alzheimer’s drug

 

“Based on their starting place,” said Dr. Huntington Potter of the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, “people who received Leukine versus people who received the placebo, showed a difference in activities of daily living.”

 

9News, July 19, 2017

Can lasers heal brain injuries? Two Colorado docs shine a light.

 

“We don’t have an approved, accepted biological test that says you’ve had a concussion,” notes Dr. James Kelly, Professor of Neurology at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. “We don’t have that on traumatic brain injury, either — especially at the mild end of the spectrum.”

 

Westword, July 4, 2017

CU Anschutz accepting applications for patients in new veteran services center

 

“People who have lingering concussion symptoms that simply haven’t resolved can come here no matter what else has been tried for this intensive care program,” said Dr. James Kelly, Executive Director of the Marcus Institute for Brain Health (MIBH), a new veteran services center on the University of Colorado Anschutz campus.

 

Channel 7, June 4, 2017

Your Healthy Family: UCHealth’s Mobile Stroke Unit

 

Dr. Williams Jones, Medical Director for UCHealth’s Mobile Stroke Program: “It's like bringing the emergency department to the patient, and in stroke care it’s very important to treat people as quickly as possible.”

 

KOAA-TV, May 25, 2017

New Hope for Alzheimer’s

 

Denver’s NBC affiliate, 9News/KUSA, produced a three-part series about Alzheimer’s disease research that includes interviews with researchers from the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center and footage from Dr. Huntington Potter's Lab.

 

9News, May 2017

Zika virus can trigger epilepsy

 

Beyond its known links to birth defects and other problems, the Zika virus may also trigger cases of epilepsy in infants, warn experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including Dr. Daniel Pastula, Assistant Professor of Neurology.

 

CBS News, April 18, 2017

What Can Sleep Patterns Tell Me About Possibly Having MS?

 

“It’s not only insomnia,” points out Dr. Enrique Alvarez, Assistant Professor of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine. “People with MS are affected by nocturnal leg spasms, restless leg syndrome, narcolepsy, REM sleep behavior disorder and sleep disordered breathing (apnea). Any one of these conditions can interfere with slumber and contribute to profound fatigue during waking hours.”

 

U.S. News & World Report, April 10, 2017

CU researcher Penny Clarke, PhD, secures CCTSI pilot grant to study Zika virus

 

Far from the tropical environs where Zika thrives, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical campus are investigating how exactly the virus causes damage to the central nervous system (CNS). To help do this groundbreaking work, the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute has awarded Neurology Professor Penny Clarke a pilot grant for her translational neuroscience research.

 

Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, March 23, 2017

Can Some MS Patients Safely Stop Taking Medicines?

 

Neurologist Dr. John Corboy of the University of Colorado says patients constantly ask, “‘Hey doc, how long do I need to take this?’ We really have very little data to answer a very common question.”

 

PCORI Blog, March 5, 2017

A promising new treatment for Alzheimer’s

 

“We found so far that Leukine is safe in people with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Huntington Potter, the director of Alzheimer’s research at CU Anschutz. “That means that it doesn’t have the side effects that so many other Alzheimer’s drugs have had, which are swelling in the brain and bleeding into the brain.”

 

9News, February 28, 2017

A promising new treatment for Alzheimer’s

 

Dr. Timothy Boyd, a member of Dr. Potter’s research team, showed us a picture of a mouse brain with the tell-tale amyloid deposits. The left side of the brain has far fewer deposits than the right after only one injection of Leukine. “In seven days, that one injection removed about half the plaque -- all these little white spots -- from that side of the brain versus this side of the brain. It gets rid of them. We don’t know the exact mechanism.”

 

9News, February 28, 2017

A promising new treatment for Alzheimer’s

 

“When we target amyloid in the brain, when it is removed by these different drugs … the removal sometimes triggers changes in the brain such as small hemorrhages or swelling or edema in the brain which can result in quite a bit of cognitive difficulty,” said Dr. Jonathan Woodcock, who is the clinical director of the University of Colorado Hospital’s Memory Disorders Clinic.

 

9News, February 28, 2017

​Progress in the fight against Alzheimer’s

 

CU’s First Lady Marcy Benson, whose mother battled Alzheimer’s: “I guess what I want people to understand is that it’s not just the children of people with Alzheimer’s that have a chance of getting it. As Dr. Potter says, ‘We all have a 50-50 chance of getting Alzheimer’s.’ I think everyone needs to be concerned about this, pay attention to it, give money when they can. It’s something that’s going to affect all of us, either as a caregiver or as someone with the disease.”

 

9News, February 27, 2017

Science closing in on polio-like virus that paralyzed children

 

“A lot of people were dubious about Enterovirus D68 because they said, ‘Gosh, this virus isn’t known to be neurotropic and we’re not finding it in the spinal fluid,’” said Dr. Kenneth Tyler, a CU neurologist and senior author of the paper. “We asked, ‘Would these (strains) produce a neurologic disease in mice, and would it be similar to what we saw in humans?’ And the answer was a resounding yes.”

University of Colorado School of Medicine, February 23, 2017

 

San Francisco Chronicle, February 26, 2017

Health Myths, Busted!

 

Multiple sclerosis is diagnosed more in Colorado than in other states. Yes. That’s not to say location explains causation. Not exactly, anyway. “It’s the distance from the equator that’s associated with high risk,” says Dr. John Corboy, co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.

 

5280, January 2017

4 Healthy Habits to Adopt

 

No specific diet has been proven to help MS patients, but a well-rounded plan such as the Mediterranean diet, has been associated with a lower risk of cognitive decline, heart disease, and diabetes, says Dr. John Corboy, professor of neurology at the CU School of Medicine and co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at Anschutz Medical Campus.

 

Neurology Now, Jan. 17, 2017

FacultyArticle

CO doctors find preliminary results ‘positive’ in early tests of Alzheimer’s drug

 

“Based on their starting place,” said Dr. Huntington Potter of the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, “people who received Leukine versus people who received the placebo, showed a difference in activities of daily living.”

 

9News, July 19, 2017

Should older MS patients stop taking certain treatments? CU Anschutz Medical Campus will expand its study

 

Dr. John Corboy, professor of neurology and co-director of the Rocky Mountain MS Center at CU Anschutz: “It’s fairly clear that these medicines give the greatest benefit to people when they are younger.”

 

Denverite, Nov. 2, 2016

Gary Kubiak diagnosed with “complex migraine,” will not coach Thursday in San Diego

 

“A lot of people know about migraines that cause visual changes or flashing lights in the eyes or some loss of vision, like a blind spot. But migraines can also cause symptoms that look more like a stroke,” said Dr. Sharon Poisson, a neurologist at University of Colorado Hospital.

 

Denver Post, October 10, 2016

A mysterious polio-like illness that paralyzes people may be surging this year

 

“We are definitely hearing of cases from our colleagues across the country,” said Dr. Teri Schreiner, a neurologist at the University of Colorado and Children’s Hospital Colorado. “It’s a trend that’s worrisome … what I’m hearing from others seems to be coming at a tempo similar to what happened in 2014.”

 

​One glimmer of good news came from Dr. Kenneth Tyler, Chair of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine: “It looks like we’re seeing protection with IVIG in the mouse model.”

 

 

Washington Post, Sept. 21, 2016

​In Memoriam: Don Gilden, MD  | 1937-2016

 

Dr. Donald Gilden, the Department of Neurology's second and longest serving Chair (1985-2009), passed away after a long illness on August 22, 2016. Dr. Gilden came to Colorado to lead the School of Medicine's Department of Neurology in 1985 and remained an active member of the faculty until his death. Don was an undergraduate at Dartmouth, received his Medical degree from the University of Maryland, and then trained in Neurology at the University of Chicago. He was a Professor of Neurology at the Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania when he was recruited in 1985 to become the second Chair of the University of Colorado's Department of Neurology. Read more...

 

Department of Neurology, Aug. 23, 2016

Colorado researcher gets $1 million to advance Alzheimer’s drug trial

 

Researcher Dr. Huntington Potter, Director of the Rocky Mountain Alzheimer’s Disease Center and a University of Colorado professor, has been awarded $1 million to advance his clinical trial that focuses on treating neuroinflammation to slow or halt the disease.

 

Denver Post, Aug. 4, 2016

William Jones, MD

Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit comes to Colorado Springs

 

“The highly-trained stroke teams at hospitals throughout UCHealth are focused on providing life-saving treatments to stroke patients as quickly as possible,” said Dr. William Jones, medical director of stroke services for UCHealth. “Until now, we’ve had to wait until a patient arrives at the hospital to treat them. Now, our teams are able to actually examine a patient and start treatment before they even arrive at the emergency department.”

 

August 4, 2016

UCHealth testing device for chronic migraines

 

The University of Colorado Hospital’s Lowry Clinic is the first in the country to conduct clinical trials of a non-invasive device that treats chronic migraines. Dr. Marius Birlea, a neurologist with the CU School of Medicine, is leading the trial that began in January. Birlea directs the Headache Clinic at University of Colorado Hospital.

 

9News, July 22, 2016

The Power of Faith

 

Dr. Douglas Ney, a neuro-oncologist with the University of Colorado Hospital who specializes in Erdheim-Chester disease: “When people approach this with a good support — either in their faith or outlook — the time that they have really becomes of quality.”

 

Lakewood Sentinel, June 27, 2016

CU researchers find key to some symptoms of severe West Nile infection

 

A study by Drs. Kenneth Tyler and Bette K. DeMasters of the CU School of Medicine, in collaboration with Washington University in St. Louis, has unlocked the cause of memory loss, mood disorders and other symptoms triggered by severe cases of West Nile virus, an illness spread by mosquitoes that affected more than 100 Coloradans last year and led to two deaths.

“It helps us understand the mechanisms for something we’ve been seeing in patients,” said TylerTyler, Chair of the Neurology Department on CU’s Anschutz Medical Campus. “They’re things we actually have drugs for, that are being used in other situations, that may block some of the bad effects of these pathways.”

 

Denver Post, June 22, 2016

Colorado woman infected with Zika on trip to Mexico

 

“Colorado’s climate is a little too cold and we are a little too far north for the normal habitat of the mosquitos that transmit Zika,” said Dr. Ken Tyler, who studies the virus at the CU School of Medicine. “Zika is usually a pretty mild infection. So the real concern has been in the risk to pregnant women.”

 

9News, June 22, 2016

Preparation remains the best Alzheimer’s defense

 

Every 66 seconds someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. In the battle between science and disease, Alzheimer's has been the clear winner for decades. There has not been a new drug approved to treat the disease since 2003. "This is a very common disease in the elderly,”Dr. Jonathan Woodcock notes. “It's important for everyone to plan for the possibility because the older we live the more likely we are going to get dementia at some point. Making plans ahead of time makes sense.” Lifestyle changes and advance care planning are first and second lines of defense.

 

Source: UCHealth Today, June 7, 2016

Spirit, attitude help stroke patient battle back from the brink at UCH

 

The diagnosis and treatment of a patient with a severe stroke involved collaboration among a team of University of Colorado Hospital physicians, among them Sharon Poisson, MD, Co-Medical Director of the Stroke Program at UCH. Jim Cohen continues to drive himself on a long road to recovery, assisted by family and providers.

 

Source: UCHealth Today, June 7, 2016

Doctors researching Zika ahead of Olympics

 

Dr. Ken Tyler, a neurologist with the University of Colorado Hospital and Department Chair of Neurology at the CU School of Medicine: “The more people you have going to and coming back from areas where there’s infection, the more likelihood you have of establishing disease in the United States.”

 

9News, May 29, 2016

Tracking the Rise of Zika Complications

 

“This is the first time, in the last year or two, that Zika virus has spread to thousands and thousands of people throughout South America, Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean, as well as other places in the Pacific,” said Dr. Daniel M. Pastula, neurologist and medical epidemiologist at the CU School of Medicine.

 

Medscape Multispecialty, May 27, 2016

MS Society: Progressive MS Biggest Challenge For Researchers

 

University of Colorado neurologist Dr. John Corboy, who is a board member for the National MS Socity Colorado/Wyoming Chapter: “I’m hopeful we will be reading about MS in the history books. Right now, we’ve made incredible leaps forward.”

 

CBS4, May 27, 2016