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Golden Stethoscope Awards

Sponsored by Foundations of Doctoring and the Office of Community Based Medical Education, the Golden Stethoscope awards provide medical students an opportunity to thank preceptors for their time and dedication.

All students are allowed to nominate a preceptor, and each nominee receives recognition and a printed copy of the letter at the annual awards banquet held each spring. The winners are selected through a panel review process.  

"The Golden Stethoscope awards are given to recognize and thank our clinical educators for their commitment to medical students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  As one of the student nomination letters reminded me, the word doctor stems from the Latin root docer which literally means "to teach."   All of our nominees and award winners have embraced the teaching component of their role and have served as tremendous role models for the next generation of physicians.  Thank you for being fantastic educators, mentors, coaches, and role models for our students. This program would not be possible without you!"

-  Kristin Furfari, MD

Read the 2021 Student Nomination Letters

 

Best Phase 1 preceptor:
The Phase 1 preceptorship experience provides students with their first clinical interactions.  It allows students to apply some of the basic science knowledge they are acquiring in the classroom, helps them to feel comfortable interacting with patients, and most importantly provides them with the opportunity to gain exposure to a practicing physician who can serve as a role model and mentor during their training.
Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Phase 1 Preceptor.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters. 

Best Phase 2 preceptor: 
The Phase 2 preceptorship experience provides students with opportunities to refine their patient interview and physical exam skills, and to develop their clinical reasoning and medical documentation in preparation for the clerkship years.  Phase 2 preceptors continue to serve as tremendous role models and mentors for their students. 
Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Phase 2 Preceptor.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best Phase 3 preceptor: 
The Phase 3 preceptorship experience provides students with the opportunity to explore different medical specialties of interest.  Students gain valuable insight and mentorship from physicians working within the various specialties.  Some students elect to continue working with their original preceptor from their first or second year, highlighting the value of longitudinal mentorship.
Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Phase 3 Preceptor.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best Phase 4 preceptor:
The Phase 4 preceptorship experience provides students with the opportunity to explore different medical specialties of interest.  Students gain valuable insight and mentorship from physicians working within the various specialties.  Some students elect to continue working with their original preceptor from their first, second, or third year, highlighting the value of longitudinal mentorship.
Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Phase 4 Preceptor.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best role model: 
This award receives the most nominations every year, speaking to the incredible ways that Foundations preceptors serve as role models for their medical student preceptees.  Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Role Model.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best patient/physician communication skills: 
Much of the communication learned during preceptorship comes from observing communication skills as role-modeled by preceptors.  Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Patient/Provider Communication.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best use of physical exam skills: 
Preceptorship allows students to develop and refine their physical exam skills in the clinical setting. Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best use of Physical Exam Skills.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best clinical reasoning: 
Because clinical reasoning is best taught in the clinical setting, preceptorship provides the perfect opportunity for students to develop and refine their clinical reasoning skills.Students were asked to describe why their preceptor deserves the title of “Best Clinical Reasoning Preceptor.”  This winner was chosen by Foundations of Doctoring faculty review of the many deserving nomination letters.

Best use of virtual health: 
As an outcome of the pandemic, many clinical settings transitioned to using virtual health technology for patient encounters. This award is chosen to recognize someone who has been effective in teaching clinical skills and engaging student participation using virtual health.

Commitment during a Pandemic: 
The pandemic transformed our lives in many ways, often adding additional responsibilities and stressors. This award is chosen to recognize someone who has remained committed, not only to the clinical education, but also to the well-being of their medical student preceptee during the pandemic.

Demonstrating Leadership: One of the goals of the Foundations of Doctoring preceptorship program is to connect students with clinical and educational leaders within our medical community.  This award is chosen to recognize someone who embodies and role-models the traits of an impactful leader. 

Fostering curiosity: 
Instilling curiosity in students encourages their desire to learn.  This award is chosen to recognize someone who fosters curiosity about science, patients, and the broader healthcare system.  

Allyship:
Although this wasn’t a formal nomination category, we were struck by the many ways that preceptors demonstrate allyship, as described in student nominations letters.  This award is chosen to recognize someone who serves as an ally by taking tangible actions to dismantle systems of oppression. 

Volunteer Faculty Preceptor Award:
Many of our amazing preceptors are Volunteer Clinical Faculty members through the Office of Community Based Medical Education (OCBME).  This award is chosen to recognize someone who truly embodies the values of the program, shows tremendous student support, and role- models high quality clinical care in the community setting. 

Below are awards selected by the FDC Team

Kris Wenzel Award: 
The Kris Wenzel Award which is given to an individual to recognize their support for the Foundations of Doctoring preceptorship program. 
Kris Wenzel was the Executive Director of the Central Colorado AHEC Program for nearly 12 years.  Her career was focused on supporting individuals to find their passion in medicine and she was extremely committed to the Foundations of Doctoring preceptorship program.  Kris understood that the importance of preceptorship goes well beyond clinical medicine and that the relationships formed are invaluable to both medical students and their preceptors.
Kris passed away August 1, 2013.  Her legacy will remain in the in the lives of the many students and preceptors she touched throughout her career.  

Faculty Choice Award
This award is chosen by the Foundations of Doctoring faculty to recognize someone who truly embodies the values of the program, shows tremendous student support, and acts as a role model, both in the clinical and non-clinical realms.  

Volunteer Faculty Preceptor Award
Many of our amazing preceptors are Volunteer Clinical Faculty members through the Office of Community Based Medical Education (OCBME).  This award is chosen to recognize someone who truly embodies the values of the program, shows tremendous student support, and role- models high quality clinical care in the community setting.

Ancora Imparo Award
Ancora Imparo translates literally as “Yet, I am learning” and has been said to be the words of Michaelangelo when he was 87 years old. The phrase “we are all still learning” is the motto of the FDC communications skill coaches and the sentiment we embrace as we seek to coach students in developing their skills in communicating with and building relationships with their patients. This award is given each year to communication coaches who continually seek to improve their coaching skills, volunteer dozens of hours of time each semester and are highly evaluated by our students.

Awardees