Newsroom

  • As Covid-19 cases climb, Colorado hospitals get morale boost from new U.S. News rankings

    Jul 27, 2021 by Denver Business Journal
    “We’re very excited and grateful for the high ranking,” said Jean Kutner, chief medical officer for the University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “What it shows is, while collective attention has been on Covid-19, we have continued to take care of all of our patients and the other diseases and illnesses they have. We focus on quality and the safety of those patients.”
    Full story
  • COVID Travel Restrictions Not Expected To Ease Up

    Jul 26, 2021 by CBS4
    Michelle Barron, the Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says the number of cases there has gone up, once again. “About 6% of our COVID patients are in the vaccinated — that means 94% are unvaccinated,” she said.
    Full story
  • UCHealth, Denver Health will require all employees to get COVID-19 vaccines this fall

    Jul 28, 2021 by Denver Post
    Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said patients and visitors to the hospital won’t have to get the shot, though they’re encouraged to do so. The Oct. 1 deadline is meant to give everyone “ample opportunity” to schedule their shots around summer vacations and other commitments, she said. “The focus is the safety of our staff, our patients, our visitors,” she said.
    Full story
  • Colorado State welcomes its first class of medical students in partnership with CU

    Jul 29, 2021 by The Coloradoan (Fort Collins)
    A study led by D. Ross Camidge, director of thoracic oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and CU Cancer Center member, has helped to define MET amplification as a rare but potentially actionable driver for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
    Full story
  • MET Amplification Drives Some Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Jul 21, 2021 by Technology Networks
    A study led by D. Ross Camidge, director of thoracic oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and CU Cancer Center member, has helped to define MET amplification as a rare but potentially actionable driver for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
    Full story
  • Dr. Pollyea on Indications for Anti-CD33 Therapy in AML

    Jul 19, 2021 by OncLive
    Daniel Pollyea, associate professor of medicine/hematology, and the clinical director of Leukemia Services at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, discusses indications for anti-CD33 therapy in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
    Full story
  • Coalition releases video promoting safe firearms storage to help reduce deaths by suicide

    Jul 18, 2021 by The Gazette (Colorado Springs)
    Erik Wallace, associate dean and associate professor of medicine for the Colorado Springs branch of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, founded the grassroots group with the goal of reducing the community’s deaths by suicide using guns through education and awareness. … “It’s going to take time, but if you limit access to lethal means, the chance of dying from a suicide decreases,” Wallace said.
    Full story
  • Ozone Season is upon us, understanding it and how to protect yourself

    Jul 20, 2021 by Longmont Leader
    It’s essential, however, to take individual health status into account when deciding how to best reduce the risks of ozone exposure, said Todd Bull, pulmonologist and director of the Comprehensive Lung and Breathing Program at the University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • July 12, 2021: Disparities In Life Expectancy; Exhibit Breaks Down Indigenous Stereotypes

    Jul 12, 2021 by CPR News
    Lily Cervantes, an associate professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at Denver Health and CU School of Medicine, interviewed in segment “Life Expectancy In Colorado Fell Sharply During The Pandemic, Especially For People Of Color,” on Colorado Matters.
    Full story
  • ‘Crisis Exacerbates Inequality’: COVID-19 Hit Hardest In The Front Range Neighborhoods Where The Most People Of Color Live

    Jul 15, 2021 by CPR News
    “I think what the data are basically showing is that, by neighborhood, cases are higher in neighborhoods where people live in closer contact,” said Lilia Cervantes, an associate professor in the department of medicine at Denver Health [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID Delta Variant Is Spreading In Colorado’s Low-Vaccinated Areas

    Jul 14, 2021 by CBS4
    “The initial estimates from the original strain of COVID were that you would likely spread it to two or three people. With the Delta variant, it’s more like four to five people. And then those four to five people go on to spread it to four or five more people,” said Michelle Barron, an infectious disease expert at UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • How does natural COVID immunity compare to the vaccine?

    Jul 15, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] said doctors’ understanding so far is that a person’s natural immunity to COVID is a lot more tailored to what specifically happened to their body, while the vaccine is more encompassing, including protection against variants.
    Full story
  • The unexpected trend with asthma during the pandemic

    Jul 14, 2021 by 9News
    “We know viruses, respiratory viruses like colds, can cause asthma exacerbations,” said Anne Fuhlbrigge, a pulmonologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] and co-investigator in the study. “That is playing a role in this. There was less exposure to other people, social distancing and masks -- allowed asthma patients to be free from other viruses.”
    Full story
  • Coloradans, Doctors Weigh In On Need For COVID Booster As Pfizer Pushes For Federal Approval

    Jul 14, 2021 by CBS4
    UCHealth Senior Director of Infection Prevention, Michelle Barron, is following the research. “We know that these are probably not going to last our lifetime, so without question, at some point, we probably will need another shot just like we do with flu or tetanus,” said Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “With these variants that are circulating, does that impact the efficacy? I think that’s the ongoing debate.”
    Full story
  • Fútbol, Flags And Fun: Getting Creative To Reach Unvaccinated Latinos in Colorado

    Jul 10, 2021 by NPR
    All this portends a more uneven pandemic, says Fernando Holguin, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] a pulmonologist and critical care doctor at the Latino Research and Policy Center at the Colorado School of Public Health. He worries cases, hospitalizations and deaths will keep flaring up in less-vaccinated communities, especially predominantly Hispanic communities in parts of Colorado or other states where overall vaccination rates are poor.
    Full story
  • Can vaccinated people get long Covid? Doctors say risk is ‘very, very small’

    Jul 15, 2021 by NBC News
    Natasha Altman, a cardiologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], agreed that it may be too soon to understand the vaccines’ effects on long-term Covid-19 symptoms. “I think the trends are going to only really going to start bearing out in the next six months,” she said.
    Full story
  • 9 Ways to Fight Back Against RA Fatigue

    Jul 7, 2021 by Health Central
    “When your body is inflamed from RA, your body diverts its energy to healing,” explains Kevin Deane, a professor of rheumatology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Did Plague Push Immune System Evolution?

    Jul 2, 2021 by Infectious Disease Special Edition
    “We found that innate immune markers increased in frequency in modern people from the town compared with plague victims,” said Paul Norman, an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus. “This suggests these markers might have evolved to resist the plague.”
    Full story
  • As pandemic wanes, will burnout fuel exodus of Colorado health care workers?

    Jul 3, 2021 by Denver Post
    “It’s as if we’ve been in a war zone for the last year,” said Marc Moss, head of the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who has researched burnout among hospital workers. “It’s not anyone’s fault. We have tough jobs and we see tragedy.”
    Full story
  • Virus cases are surging at crowded immigration detention centers in the U.S.

    Jul 6, 2021 by The New York Times
    Carlos Franco-Paredes, an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who has inspected immigration detention centers during the pandemic, said that several factors were to blame for the surge, including transfers of detainees between facilities, insufficient testing and lax Covid-19 safety measures.
    Full story
  • Changes to COVID-19 vaccination strategy could speed up herd immunity

    Jul 8, 2021 by News Medical
    “Unfortunately, until we can safely, rapidly, and affordably vaccinate enough people to achieve collective immunity, we cannot afford to disregard the benefits of naturally acquired immunity in those whose prior documented infections have already run their course,” writes Martin Krsak [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] and colleagues.
    Full story
  • Arvada couple tests positive for COVID-19 despite being fully vaccinated

    Jul 7, 2021 by Channel 7
    “Delta is here,” Michelle Barron said. Barron is the senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth. She says the delta variant isn’t going away anytime soon. “The part that’s concerning is the delta variant is highly, highly contagious — more contagious than the standard COVID virus we saw at the beginning. Actually 60% potentially more contagious.”
    Full story
  • Colorado has the 4th highest COVID death rate. This doctor says the Delta variant may be to blame

    Jul 6, 2021 by 9News
    “The presence of the delta variant, which is significantly more contagious, but also has been shown to have poorer outcomes, people get sicker from it, is probably what we’re seeing represented with that,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Sotagliflozin reduces deaths, time spent in hospital for some patients with diabetes

    Jun 21, 2021 by Healio
    Previously, the SOLOIST-WHF trial showed that sotagliflozin reduced cardiovascular deaths as well as hospitalizations and urgent visits for heart failure among patients with diabetes who were recently hospitalized for worsening heart failure, Michael Szarek, a visiting professor in the division of cardiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told Healio Primary Care.
    Full story
  • Hold Off on Approving Anal Cancer Drug, Advisors Tell FDA

    Jun 24, 2021 by Medpage Today
    “With a response rate of 14%, and only half of that population showing a significant durable response, it is certainly problematic, and doesn’t predict clinical benefit,” said Christopher Lieu, of the University of Colorado. “I think everyone feels the pressure and stress of trying to improve treatment options for what is essentially an orphan disease, but unfortunately the response is simply too low to support the indication at this time.”
    Full story
  • Consider air quality index, individual health to determine time spent outdoors

    Jun 24, 2021 by Steamboat Pilot & Today
    The general rule of thumb is the worse the air quality is then the shorter amount of time residents should spend outdoors, said Todd Bull, director of the Center for Lungs and Breathing at UCHealth Pulmonary Vascular Disease Clinic part of Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. “It doesn’t take much exposure. If you have underlying respiratory disease, even a short exposure can result in significant worsening of breathing,” said Bull, who works in pulmonary disease and critical care medicine.
    Full story
  • POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Question: Should Colorado be holding vaccine sweepstakes?

    Jun 20, 2021 by Denver Gazette
    Matthew Wynia is a Professor in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Director of the University of Colorado’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities, located on the Anschutz Medical Campus: “I’m not usually a fan of lotteries — they’re a tax on people who are bad at math, my math teacher once joked. But unlike a lottery, which requires buying a ticket, entry into the COVID-19 vaccination sweepstakes is automatic and free for everyone who gets the vaccine. Here’s why I’m in favor of them.”
    Full story
  • Common colds return as fewer Coloradans wear masks and socially distance

    Jun 18, 2021 by Denver Post
    “It’s been so interesting because for the last year with COVID, we basically didn’t see anything else and it was such a bizarre thing to see,” said Michelle Barron, senior director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Colorado doctors praise plan to develop COVID-19 antiviral pill

    Jun 22, 2021 by Fox 31
    “We can use a pill as post exposure medication. For example, we do that in influenza patients. In a nursing home, if somebody comes down with influenza – then the other people who have been in association with the person who had the flu – take the pill to prevent them from the influenza,” said Lakshmi Chauhan, an infectious disease expert with UCHealth [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • 2021 Outstanding Early Career Scholars

    Jun 28, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine is pleased to announce the 2021 recipients of the Outstanding Early Career Scholars Program (OECSP) awards: William Cornwell, MD; Katharina Hopp, PhD; and Christine Swanson, MD.
    Full story
  • Drinking This Much Coffee Every Day Adds Years to Your Life, Study Says

    Jun 15, 2021 by Best Life
    “The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising,” David P. Kao, the study’s senior author, assistant professor of cardiology, and medical director at the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said in a statement.
    Full story
  • Coffee Lovers, Rejoice! Drinking More Coffee Linked With Decreased Heart Failure Risk

    Jun 15, 2021 by SciTech Daily
    “While smoking, age and high blood pressure are among the most well-known heart disease risk factors, unidentified risk factors for heart disease remain,” according to David P. Kao, senior author of the study, assistant professor of cardiology and medical director at the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • To Get The COVID Vaccine To More Hispanic And Latino Coloradans, The New Goal Is Meeting The Unvaccinated Where They Are

    Jun 15, 2021 by CPR News
    Denver has hit the 70 percent threshold for resident vaccination, but some of its Latino neighborhoods are getting vaccinated at much lower rates, according to Lilia Cervantes, an associate professor in the department of medicine at Denver Health [and CU School of Medicine].​
    Full story
  • Colorado Offered Prison Staff $500 To Boost COVID Vaccinations Two Months Ago. Around 40% Remain Unpoked

    Jun 11, 2021 by KUNC (Greeley)
    “If people don’t like the idea of an incentive, you have to think: okay, so what are the alternatives?” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz. “Because in the end, for many vaccines we have, if the vaccine is important, we have had to implement mandates in order to keep people vaccinated over time.”
    Full story
  • Yes, your child can get the COVID-19 vaccine on top of other vaccines

    Jun 11, 2021 by Fox 31
    “It is generally recommended if you’re going to get multiple vaccines that you sort of distribute them on different arms so that [your child is] not completely in pain the rest of the day. But yeah, you can get a COVID shot, a flu shot – whatever they need – you can get them all at the same time,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention & Control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • CDC looking into possible link between heart inflammation and COVID vaccine

    Jun 13, 2021 by Fox 31
    Bill Cornwell with University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine] says the condition called “Myocarditis” is rare and it’s unclear at this point if there is a link to the vaccine. “The obvious concern is that in some way, somehow the vaccine stimulates your immune system and which then acts against your heart, causing injury to your heart,” said Cornwell.
    Full story
  • Some Colorado counties ramping down COVID testing sites

    Jun 13, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron is an infectious disease expert at UC Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. She said it is good news that trends are moving in the right direction for now but testing can’t just go away. “COVID has done this lovely rollercoaster and so in the summer months we might get a bit of a reprieve but that doesn’t mean we are done with this,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • Survey: 44% of vaccinated Coloradans will avoid unvaccinated friends, co-workers

    Jun 15, 2021 by Fox 31
    “People’s bubbles, if you didn’t follow the rules of the bubble, you got kicked out of the bubble, right? Or some people never had bubbles so I can see this as being a very philosophical dividing thing and can see how this would be of concern,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention & Control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Virtually all hospitalized Covid patients have one thing in common: They’re unvaccinated

    Jun 11, 2021 by NBC News
    It’s been the same for Ken Lyn-Kew, a pulmonologist in the critical care department at National Jewish Health [and clinical instructor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]: “None of our ICU patients has been vaccinated.” Unvaccinated children, too, seem to be at increased risk for severe illness.
    Full story
  • Hospital Medicine Leaders Offer Tips for Gender Equity

    May 28, 2021 by Medscape
    When Marisha Burden, division head of hospital medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, would go to medical conferences, it seemed as if very few women were giving talks. Could she be wrong? she wondered.
    Full story
  • A Brief But Spectacular take on breaking the script in healthcare

    Jun 7, 2021 by PBS Newshour
    Carey Candrian from the University of Colorado School of Medicine is a scientist who has spent much of her career investigating how healthcare can be compromised if an open discussion with patients is avoided. Candrian offers her Brief But Spectacular view on reimagining the language we use in healthcare, especially around elderly LBGTQ members.
    Full story
  • Soccer tournament sells out at Empower Field, 1st large capacity event since pandemic

    Jun 6, 2021 by Fox 31
    UCHealth is holding a vaccination clinic at a bus on the concourse at section 116/117. Anyone wanting to get the Johnson & Johnson one shot COVID-19 vaccine can do so at the stadium. “There are 90 people on the schedule. We have 70 players and coaches and 20 fans total,” Jean Kutner [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], with UCHealth said.
    Full story
  • Colorado COVID cases the lowest they’ve been since the pandemic began

    Jun 9, 2021 by Fox 31
    “If you look at different data sets, it all shows the same thing: as the uptake of vaccines goes up, the number of cases goes down,” said Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I just want to make sure people don’t get complacent. If you haven’t gotten your vaccine, it’s still important that you get it.”
    Full story
  • Could Yogurt in Diet Help Diagnose Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the Future?

    Jun 14, 2021 by CU Anschutz Today
    University of Colorado Department of Medicine and Rice University researchers teamed up on a non-invasive diagnostic that changes color as a biomarker of active inflammatory bowel disease. The engineered strain of the harmless gut bacteria E. coli senses fluctuations in pH levels, changing color as the pH decreases.
    Full story
  • These Glowing Bacteria Can Diagnose Gut Problems

    May 23, 2021 by FreeThink
    His current collaborator, Colorado immunology professor Sean Colgan, points out, specifically, “It turns out that measuring pH within the intestine through noninvasive ways is quite difficult.” But those tens of thousands of genetic sensors in bacteria can do the job just fine.
    Full story
  • The Surprising Symptoms of GERD You Should Know

    May 20, 2021 by Livestrong.com
    Acid reflux — or heartburn — occurs when stomach acid flows backward into the esophagus, Jennifer Czwornog, gastroenterologist with UCHealth Gastroenterology Clinic at Cherry Creek Medical Center [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells LIVESTRONG.com.
    Full story
  • Estimated 2,100 New Cases Of Colon Cancer Each Year Among Coloradans

    May 21, 2021 by CBS4
    Chris Lieu, the Associate Director of Clinical Research at the CU Cancer Center, explained the change stems from an increase in the number of colorectal cancer cases among younger people.
    Full story
  • Future generations could be immune to COVID-19

    May 21, 2021 by Explica.co
    “We found that innate immune markers were increased in frequency in contemporary society compared to plague victims, suggesting that these markers may have evolved to resist plague,” concludes the study’s co-lead author Paul Norman, associate professor in the Division of Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • ATS: Antiviral Cocktail Highly Effective in At-Risk Covid Patients

    May 24, 2021 by Physician's Weekly
    Session co-chair and pediatric pulmonologist Jennifer Taylor-Cousar, of National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said it is important to determine the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody treatments in this group of at-risk younger children. “At National Jewish we take care of some really sick, complicated kids,” she said. “(This treatment) is not indicated for my 8-year-old patient with interstitial lung disease, but it sure made me nervous not to give it to her.”
    Full story
  • Opioid treatment in COVID long-haulers sparks concern

    May 24, 2021 by Fox 31
    “Opioids are easy to prescribe — and yes, they are effective. They will alleviate your pain. The problem is they are not the recommended first line treatment for pain,” said Bill Cornwell, a cardiologist with University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Cornwell helps treat patients at UCHealth’s post-COVID clinic. He says identifying effective treatment for long-haulers is a moving target.
    Full story
  • UCHealth Looks Ahead To Potential For COVID Vaccine Boosters In Colorado

    May 27, 2021 by CBS4
    “Other countries are having huge surges, and the need for them to get even just one vaccine probably trumps any need for a booster at this point,” said UCHealth Senior Director of Infection Prevention, Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “But that can change on a dime.”
    Full story
  • Next Question: If vaccines have an expiration date, will masks come back?

    May 20, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] says there's no definite answer, but it probably has a lot to do with COVID infection rates staying low.
    Full story
  • How to Help Your Body Recover From Lingering COVID-19 Symptoms, According to MDs

    May 25, 2021 by Real Simple
    Additionally, Bill Cornwell, [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] a cardiologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital who works with patients at the hospital’s Post-COVID Clinic, notes that some of the symptoms in more serious cases of the infection may include severe difficulty breathing, chest pressure and/or pain, and confusion.
    Full story
  • Dr Fernando Holguin Describes How Metabolic Syndrome Impacts Risk of Pulmonary Disease

    May 14, 2021 by AJMC
    There are likely to be multiple mechanisms accounting for the relationship between these 2 conditions, said Fernando Holguin, a pulmonologist and critical care doctor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Holguin discussed these topics at this year's American Thoracic Society (ATS) meeting.
    Full story
  • Your Healthy Family: Infectious disease expert addresses some of parents’ biggest concerns about COVID vaccine for kids

    May 13, 2021 by KOAA (Pueblo)
    Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says many drugs are generally dosed based on a person’s weight because that’s how those medicines work the best. “If you're taking a medication by mouth or by IV (intravenously), the idea is that you're trying to get a concentration into your bloodstream.”
    Full story
  • Denver Siblings Take A Shot At The Study Of A COVID Vaccine By Novavax

    May 19, 2021 by CBS4
    Thomas Campbell is the principal investigator of the study and Chief Clinical Research Officer of UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Results from a UK study showed the vaccine was 96% effective against the original COVID virus, 86% against the UK variant.
    Full story
  • Will the CDC’s latest guidance on masks encourage more Coloradans to get vaccinated?

    May 17, 2021 by Channel 7
    Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, said the latest guidance from the CDC was meant to show people who are still on the fence about getting the vaccine some of the benefits that come with it, besides protecting yourself from COVID-19, though she admitted she was a bit nervous about how people were going to take the information.
    Full story
  • In Colorado, “If You’re Vaccinated, You Don’t Need To Wear A Mask,” Polis Says

    May 14, 2021 by CPR News
    Michelle Barron, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who specializes in infectious diseases at UCHealth called it a “calculated gamble” that may result in increased vaccination rates. “I think it’s a very calculated gamble. I think the odds are in its favor...” Barron said. “And I really do think it will incentivize a lot of people (to get vaccinated), but we'll see.”
    Full story
  • Colorado Doctor Says Understanding Risks Is Key As More People Will Be Without Masks Under Governor’s New Plan

    May 14, 2021 by CBS4
    Studies are showing that those vaccinated, without other health risks, are well protected. “I actually agree with that completely,” said Michelle Barron, an infectious diseases specialist with UCHealth Hospital [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Department of Medicine Announces 2021-22 PACE Scholars

    May 18, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine announces the 2021-22 Program for Academic Clinician Education (PACE) Scholars.
    Full story
  • 6 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Booking An International Trip

    May 11, 2021 by HuffPost
    “Some countries may require a negative COVID-19 test before entry, including returning to the U.S.,” said Andrés Henao, an internal medicine physician, infectious disease specialist, and director of the UCHealth Travel Clinic [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Visit a travel clinic before international travel for more comprehensive prevention recommendations.”
    Full story
  • How the world missed more than half of all Covid-19 deaths

    May 7, 2021 by Vox
    The problems start with the death certificate. Ivor Douglas, chief of the Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Medicine division at the Denver Health Medical Center [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], explained that death certificates emphasize the primary cause of death, which is the most immediate condition leading to the fatality. Death certificates also have space for secondary and indirect causes.
    Full story
  • UCHealth wraps up Phase 3 of Novavax COVID-19 vaccine trial

    May 10, 2021 by 9News
    Thomas Campbell, UCHealth’s chief clinical research officer [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], updated 9NEWS on the trial so far.
    Full story
  • UCHealth Virologist explains efficacy of COVID-19 booster shots

    May 10, 2021 by Channel 7
    Thomas Campbell, a University of Colorado School of Medicine and UCHealth virologist and infectious-disease specialist, spoke with Denver7 about the future of booster shots and their efficacy with COVID-19 variants.
    Full story
  • If You’re This Age, Be Worried About COVID Right Now

    May 6, 2021 by Eat This, Not That!
    “A lot of them are requiring ICU care,” said Michelle Barron, head of infection prevention and control at UCHealth, one of Colorado’s large hospital systems, [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] as compared with earlier in the pandemic.
    Full story
  • What happens if herd immunity isn’t achieved in Colorado?

    May 6, 2021 by 9News
    We talked to Richard Zane with UCHealth, Connie Price with Denver Health [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] and Jim Neid with HealthOne.
    Full story
  • COVID In Colorado: Summer Could See Big Decline In Cases

    May 6, 2021 by CBS4
    “They pulled together six different modeling teams and they took six different looks at what would happen over the next several months and all six different models agreed we would hit a peak,” said UCHealth Hospital [and CU School of Medicine] Infectious disease specialist David Beckham.
    Full story
  • Denver’s Spanish-speaking doctors are fighting COVID-19 with their language skills. Their care goes beyond words.

    May 12, 2021 by Denverite
    Gaby Frank was in Argentina in December 2019 when she first got reports about a new respiratory infection in China. The disease did not have a name. The reports from specialists around the world only mentioned multiple cases of pneumonia. Frank, who’s a hospitalist at Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], is trained in managing viral outbreaks.​
    Full story
  • UCHealth doctor shares personal pandemic heartache

    May 2, 2021 by Fox 31
    Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth, is not only armed with the knowledge to battle the virus, she is also filled with an experience that allows her to understand the emotional pain. “I could really empathize with family and patients in terms of what they were going through,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • The fight against COVID-19 turned very personal for a top Colorado medical expert

    May 5, 2021 by Rocky Mountain PBS
    The COVID-19 pandemic is the kind of health catastrophe that Michelle Barron has spent decades preparing for. It's “not something you hope for, but you always think about and plan for, and obviously your training goes into motion,” she said. Barron is the senior medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth, which praises her as “the top infectious disease expert in Colorado.”
    Full story
  • Doctor shares her story of COVID-19 loss to inspire Coloradans to get the vaccine

    Apr 30, 2021 by 9News
    For the past year, Michelle Barron has shared her expertise in the field of infectious disease. The Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention and Control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] is a frequent voice in 9NEWS stories, sharing updates on the pandemic and vaccine efforts.
    Full story
  • Doctors with long COVID-19 share their struggles to heal

    May 4, 2021 by AAMC
    For Sunita Sharma, COVID-19 started out simple. In September, a week after working in an intensive care unit, the pulmonologist developed muscle aches and a low-grade fever for a couple of days. But tougher symptoms soon hit. Sharma, who works at UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] in Aurora, Colorado, developed sweats that drenched her sheets and a cough so bad she could barely talk.
    Full story
  • Surviving COVID twice: A Denver woman goes 2 rounds with the disease

    Apr 30, 2021 by Rocky Mountain PBS
    Sarah Jolley of UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine], who was Cindy Schulz’s COVID outpatient rehabilitation doctor, called hers a “pretty unique case. One, [to] have reinfection with COVID, and then also to have reinfection that results in being as sick as Cindy was the second time around and needing to go to the hospital and requiring a fair bit of oxygen for her COVID infection.”
    Full story
  • Highly contagious Brazilian COVID variant confirmed in El Paso County

    May 4, 2021 by Colorado Springs Gazette
    The variant, first discovered in Brazil, is more likely to reinfect people who have already had COVID-19 compared to the original virus, said David Beckham, associate professor of infectious disease at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • UCHealth doctor says data allowed leeway on face covering guidance

    May 3, 2021 by Fox 31
    Experts say it is better to keep a mask handy as rules vary for different circumstances. “Having a mask is just courtesy I think,” said infectious disease expert Michelle Barron of UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID-19 ‘doesn’t discriminate by age’: Serious cases on the rise in younger adults

    May 5, 2021 by Bakersfield
    “A lot of them are requiring ICU care,” said Michelle Barron, head of infection prevention and control at UCHealth, one of Colorado’s large hospital systems, as compared with earlier in the pandemic. The median age of COVID-19 patients at UCHealth hospitals has dropped by more than 10 years in the past few weeks, from 59 down to about 48 years old, Barron said. “I think we will continue to see that, especially if there’s not a lot of vaccine uptake in these groups,” she said.
    Full story
  • AI caught a hidden problem in one patient’s heart. Can it work for others?

    Apr 26, 2021 by STAT
    “The problem with the Apple Watch is that it’s sort of screening everybody and there’s such a high rate of false positives,” said Michael Rosenberg, an electrophysiologist at the University of Colorado who published a paper in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, on the use of machine learning to predict A-fib and other conditions.
    Full story
  • COVID ‘Long Haulers’

    Apr 27, 2021 by KVNF (Paonia)
    Kate Redmond interviews two COVID ‘long haulers’ about coronavirus symptoms that they have had for months. She also speaks with Bill Cornwell [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] of UCHealth in Aurora on the medical phenomena of patients who are not getting better long after their covid diagnosis.
    Full story
  • Demographics Shift: More Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Are Young Adults

    Apr 27, 2021 by NPR
    At hospitals run by the University of Colorado, Michelle Barron says the median age of COVID patients has dropped by more than a decade. It’s now people in their late 40s. “A lot of them are requiring ICU care, whereas before, a lot of them were more so just on the floor and still requiring hospitalization but not quite as sick.”
    Full story
  • Searching for recovery: Some COVID-19 long haulers find relief from vaccine, but many still struggle

    Apr 27, 2021 by Journal-Advocate (Sterling)
    “Interestingly, some of our patients who’ve had COVID in the past have noted that their symptoms improve after receiving the COVID vaccine. People will say that all of a sudden their shortness of breath or their fatigue start to get better. However, this is not everybody,” said Rebecca Keith, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Second COVID Shot: Common questions answered

    Apr 26, 2021 by KKTV (Colorado Springs)
    “There’s a spectrum,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth. “Some people had no symptoms, and so you’re worrying about some things that may not even happen. ... Younger people seem to have more reactions than older people. That probably is something to do with just their immune system being more robust.”
    Full story
  • Coloradans can self-schedule vaccine appointments with UCHealth

    Apr 23, 2021 by Fox 31
    Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention and Control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said speaking with friends and family about their vaccine experiences can soothe concerns. “The vaccine has proven to be very safe, and getting it can protect not only you but your family and friends as well,” said Barron.
    Full story
  • Colorado resumes use of single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine after US lifts pause on shot

    Apr 23, 2021 by Channel 7
    Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told Denver7 she was excited about the outcome because it could help end the pandemic.
    Full story
  • With Few New Clotting Cases, Johnson & Johnson Pause Could Be Lifted Soon

    Apr 22, 2021 by The New York Times
    Matthew Wynia, an ethicist and infectious disease physician at the University of Colorado, said that health officials faced a frightening trade-off in choosing between a pause and warning: They would know only hypothetically the lives a pause may have cost, but they would know exactly who may have suffered or died from clots.
    Full story
  • Johnson & Johnson COVID Vaccine Problems Reported In 15 Out Of 7 Million Doses

    Apr 25, 2021 by CBS4
    Denver Health Medical Center’s chief medical officer Connie Price [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] noted, “It’s an incredibly rare event and probably does greater good for the population is what the verdict was and in that regard, it’s not a surprise.”
    Full story
  • Leadership Transition: Division of Geriatrics

    Apr 28, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    Robert Schwartz, MD, to retire as head of Division of Geriatrics, and Dan Matlock, MD, has been appointed interim division head.
    Full story
  • Kathleen Barnes Appointed Departmental Endowed Chair in Medicine

    Apr 28, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    Kathleen Barnes, PhD, division head of the Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine (BIPM), and the founding director of the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine (CCPM) has been appointed the Departmental Endowed Chair in Medicine.
    Full story
  • Colorado tested more prisoners for COVID-19 than most states – but it’s not clear if that prevented deaths

    Apr 15, 2021 by Denver Post
    Testing is important, but it’s only useful if facilities that use it to make good decisions about housing prisoners, said Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious diseases specialist at UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] who works with incarcerated populations. . . . “What matters is not the number of tests, but how do you use that information from testing,” he said.
    Full story
  • U.S. Study Of Novavax COVID Vaccine Continues With 2 More Shots For Volunteers

    Apr 21, 2021 by CBS4
    “Today, Novavax began what we call a blinded crossover,” said Thomas Campbell, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] lead investigator at the study site at UCHealth, one of 115 sites.
    Full story
  • COVID Booster Shots: UCHealth Plans For Possibility Of 3rd Dose Needed Within A Year

    Apr 15, 2021 by CBS4
    “I feel like it’s just another thing that we knew was likely to happen,” said Michelle Barron, Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “The idea behind a booster is to stimulate your immune system. It’s something that your body has potentially now seen before with the first vaccine, so it’s not starting over in terms of the education of the immune response.”
    Full story
  • Which metrics will tell health experts that the COVID-19 pandemic is over?

    Apr 19, 2021 by 9News
    “I would definitely say the pandemic is not over yet,” said Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Somewhere between 70%, 80% is probably the point at which we will feel comfortable that enough people are protected that it’s not going to spread.”
    Full story
  • In race against COVID variants, scientists and doctors agree: The time to get vaccinated is now

    Apr 17, 2021 by Greeley Tribune
    Michelle Barron a top infectious disease expert in Colorado affiliated with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the FDA recommended pausing use of the J&J vaccine on April 13 due to an association with rare blood clotting issues in six women between the ages of 18-48.
    Full story
  • Your Questions About Life After Vaccination, Answered

    Apr 15, 2021 by 5280
    While it may be tempting to move about more freely after getting the first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines (it does offer some immunity), UCHealth infectious disease specialist Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] advises against it. “I think it gives people a false sense of security,” she says.
    Full story
  • Inhibitor Drug Could Stop Tumor Growth, Possible Cure for Cancer

    Apr 8, 2021 by Science Times
    “It is a receptor that surveils the intercellular compartment of a cell, looking for danger molecules or pathogens,” said Carlo Marchetti of the CU Cancer Center and among the authors of the study.
    Full story
  • Changes in gut microbiome play a role in autism development, study reveals

    Apr 7, 2021 by Study Finds
    “Longitudinally, we were able to see that within an individual, changes in the microbiome were associated with changes in behavior,” says principal study investigator Catherine Lozupone, a microbiologist at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, in a media release.
    Full story
  • National Licorice Day: Enjoy black licorice only in moderation, doctors warn

    Apr 12, 2021 by Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch
    “It’s more than licorice sticks. It could be jelly beans, licorice teas, a lot of things over the counter. Even some beers, like Belgian beers, have this compound in it,” as do some chewing tobaccos, said Robert Eckel, a University of Colorado cardiologist and former American Heart Association president.
    Full story
  • New Program Aims to Teach Rural Providers About Transgender Care

    Apr 13, 2021 by The Colorado Trust
    “Data suggests that primary care providers aren’t comfortable even with routine trans care,” says Micol Rothman, an endocrinologist at the UCHealth Integrated Transgender Program who helps teach the ECHO Colorado classes. For example, trans men who still have a cervix require a Pap smear to test for cancer, something that some providers aren’t comfortable doing: “So many patients have experiences of having to teach their providers these things. It’s exhausting.”
    Full story
  • The Most Common Lingering Symptoms After Mild COVID

    Apr 12, 2021 by WebMD
    Sarah Jolley, a pulmonologist specializing in critical care at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora and director of the Post-COVID Clinic, said, “In this cohort, similar to others, this seems to be more pronounced in women.”
    Full story
  • Study IDs Most Common Lingering Symptoms 8 Months After Mild COVID

    Apr 9, 2021 by Medscape
    “These data mirror what we have seen across long-term cohorts of patients with COVID-19 infection. Notably, mild illness among previously healthy individuals may be associated with long-term persistent symptoms,” said Sarah Jolley, a pulmonologist specializing in critical care at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and director of the Post-COVID Clinic [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Biotech company partners with National Jewish Health to test potential Covid-19 therapy

    Apr 14, 2021 by Denver Business Journal
    Chief Scientific Officer Charles Dinarello, a major player in this corner of biology, is a distinguished professor at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “He discovered the field of cytokine biology,” Olatec CEO Damaris Skouras said. “He has tireless commitment to Olatec and the next generation of inflammation therapeutics. ... Between Aurora and Boulder, where our regulatory team is based, Colorado is a hub for us, and a very important one.”
    Full story
  • Broncos schedule vaccination day for players, coaches, staff, families

    Apr 14, 2021 by NBC Sports
    In an effort to make sure everyone associated with the team understands that the vaccine is safe and effective, Michelle Barron, an infectious diseases expert at UCHealth and the CU School of Medicine, will lead a virtual educational seminar for the entire organization on Friday.
    Full story
  • Delayed treatment will put pressure on health care system

    Apr 13, 2021 by Castle Rock News Press
    Radhika Acharya-Leon, section chief for medical oncology at Highlands Ranch Hospital [and assistant professor of family medicine for CU School of Medicine], said the consequences of delayed treatment are starting to emerge each day where the disease is more progressed in colon, breast, prostate and lung cancer cases. Larry Allen, an advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said they saw a 40% decrease in heart patients at the peak of the pandemic. “When (patients) stay home with cardiac disease, there is permanent damage.” Allen said. “By the time we saw them, the damage was so much worse than it could have been and so much harder for us to treat.”
    Full story
  • A vaccine study in college students will help determine when it’s safe to take masks off

    Apr 12, 2021 by Washington Post
    “There were kids … who just broke down,” said Brian L. Stauffer, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine,] chief of cardiology at Denver Health Medical Center and one of the leaders of the Boulder trial. “One individual sat there, and recovered, and said, ‘Let’s do it.’ … It’s been great to see people participate that way. We frequently don’t give college kids enough benefit of the doubt.”
    Full story
  • Variant cases now make up more than half of new Colorado COVID-19 cases

    Apr 14, 2021 by 9News
    “The important part of tracking variants is to understand what variants are circulating, which ones are taking over. We know that this happens, all these viruses do this. Eventually, a variant takes over, it’s called a ‘replacement strain,’” said David Beckham, an infectious disease physician and virologist for UCHealth [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Already Got The Now-Paused Johnson & Johnson Vaccine? Here’s What You Should Know

    Apr 14, 2021 by CPR News
    Ken Lyn-Kew, a pulmonary and critical care physician at National Jewish [and clinical instructor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]:“We’ve already seen throughout the country, and also here in Colorado, a lot of vaccine hesitancy. People fear the unknown. And when we have these vaccines ... it’s very hard to separate the truth from what rapidly propagates on social media.”
    Full story
  • What Experts Are Learning About Sotatercept for PAH

    Apr 2, 2021 by HCPLive
    In an interview with HCPLive this week, David Badesch, of the Divisions of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine and Cardiology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, discussed the novel mechanisms and makeup of sotatercept, a drug originally developed for anemia-associated care.
    Full story
  • To defeat a foe like Parkinson’s, we must expose its secrets

    Apr 2, 2021 by Grand Rapids Business Journal
    This was a wake-up call to yet another possible nefarious side-effect of the virus. In a commentary examining the findings, Van Andel Institute’s Patrik Brundin, along with Avindra Nath of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and J. David Beckham of University of Colorado, said the cases suggest that COVID-19 may be part of a “perfect storm” for Parkinson’s disease.
    Full story
  • I recently recovered from COVID-19, and I still suffer from fatigue and muscle aches. Is it OK for me to resume my daily moderate wine intake?

    Apr 1, 2021 by Wine Spectator
    “One of the key side effects of alcohol intake is fatigue, and if you are still experiencing fatigue or other side effects after COVID-19, you may want to abstain from alcohol intake until you are fully recovered,” said Anuj Mehta, a Denver-based pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] and chair of Colorado's task force for the vaccine.
    Full story
  • Finding cancer care during COVID

    Apr 6, 2021 by Douglas County News-Press
    McCumber’s physician, Radhika Acharya-Leon, section chief for medical oncology at UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said had McCumber not been persistent in finding a place to do the biopsy and move treatment forward, she would likely have not made it through the year.
    Full story
  • Colorado health officials explore idea of vaccine passports as more and more residents are inoculated

    Apr 4, 2021 by Denver Post
    There are more than a dozen passport initiatives underway, according to The Washington Post, which creates an issue of coordination. “One problem we may bump into pretty quick here is if there are competing private sector initiatives and they have different levels of privacy protection, different levels of accessibility, different levels of opt-out,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • If Colorado has a fourth COVID wave, it will look different than the first three

    Apr 5, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron, an expert with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine], says Colorado’s in a race between vaccines and a fourth wave. Either way, a fourth wave will look different.
    Full story
  • Aurora ICE Detainees to Receive COVID Vaccine Next Week

    Apr 3, 2021 by Westword
    During an October 2020 press conference, Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious-disease doctor associated with the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said that ICE leadership should release as many detainees as possible, especially ones that were medically vulnerable, because of the dangers of catching the virus. “There’s not really any other way to protect them,” Franco-Paredes said.
    Full story
  • ‘A race between the vaccines and the variants’

    Apr 2, 2021 by Telluride Daily Planet
    “It’s obviously an incredible exciting time,” said Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth. But she stressed: “Though you do have some level of protection after your first shot, you’re not considered fully vaccinated until you’ve had both doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines, or a single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine” against the coronavirus.
    Full story
  • Face masks no longer required outside in 5 metro Denver counties

    Apr 7, 2021 by 9News
    Is it too soon to be lifting these orders? 9NEWS asked the Jefferson County Health Department, Tri-County Health Department Director John Douglas and UCHealth Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Barron to answer that question
    Full story
  • CDC Announces New COVID-19 Guidance For Gatherings, Travel Ahead Of Easter Sunday

    Apr 2, 2021 by CBS4
    “We can see the finish line, but we’re still two miles away,” said UCHealth Director of Infection Prevention, Michelle Barron. “When we talk about people being vaccinated, I think you need to understand where they are in the vaccine series.”
    Full story
  • Coloradans Urged To Maintain COVID Safety Measures Ahead Of All-Star Game

    Apr 6, 2021 by CBS4
    “I think it’s something we should be aiming for and I think there are ways we could potentially try to get to that point,” said Michelle Barron the Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • New COVID-19 safety guidelines in place for fans at Coors Field

    Apr 1, 2021 by Fox 31
    Michelle Barron, Infectious Disease Specialist with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]: “I’m concerned about big crowds without control measures, so certainly there are sporting events happening and opening up. But those are controlled conditions where people are masking and distancing and in small groupings, as opposed to what we saw in some other states where we saw just masses of people in close proximity.”
    Full story
  • Colorado Researcher Offers Answers For Those With Vaccine Hesitancies

    Apr 5, 2021 by CBS4
    “It in no way cut corners, it in no way decreased our ability to evaluate safety,” Thomas Campbell, the chief clinical research officer at UCHealth and the associate dean for clinical research at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “There was just overwhelming community support for these trials, such that there were many more people that came to us asking to join the trials than we had the capacity to enroll.”
    Full story
  • Is Machine Learning The Future Of Coffee Health Research?

    Mar 29, 2021 by Sprudge
    As reported by the New York Times, the new study isn’t exactly new at all. Led by David Kao, a cardiologist at University of Colorado School of Medicine, researchers re-examined the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), “a long-term, ongoing cardiovascular cohort study of residents of the city of Framingham, Massachusetts” that began in 1948 and has grown to include over 14,000 participants.
    Full story
  • Sotatercept Could Be a Promising Novel Agent for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Apr 1, 2021 by HCPLive
    Led by David B. Badesch, of the Divisions of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine and Cardiology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, investigators conducted a 24-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter assessment of subcutaneous sotatercept versus placebo in adult patients with PAH.
    Full story
  • Claims data reveal key clues to why patients may miss lung cancer screening exams

    Mar 31, 2021 by Radiology Business
    “Quantifying population-based adherence rates and understanding factors associated with annual adherence is a critical first step in improving screening adherence and ultimately reducing lung cancer death,” corresponding author Stephen Malkoski, with the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine at CU Anschutz, and co-authors wrote March 30 in JACR.
    Full story
  • 4 approaches to cut physicians’ mental workload—and burnout

    Mar 29, 2021 by AMA
    “Contrary to how we behave, your attention is a limited resource, and you need to protect that,” Elizabeth Harry, senior director of clinical affairs at the University of Colorado Hospital, said during a recent AMA webinar. “If we don’t have space to actually give proper attention to things, we’re going to start making mistakes and we’re not going to give our best care.”
    Full story
  • UCHealth provides resources for employees dealing with past traumas

    Mar 26, 2021 by 9News
    “It’s like physically reliving the previous experience,” Elizabeth Harry, the senior director of clinical affairs at UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital, explained. “You’ll have the same sort of stress response that you had with the first event, and that’s what sort of happens when you don’t process trauma.”
    Full story
  • COVID-19 patient receives first COVID-related lung transplant in Colorado

    Mar 29, 2021 by Channel 7
    When the ventilator was no longer working, Mark Steele and his team placed Bryan on an ECMO machine. “What happens is as the lungs become so bad, the ventilator can’t oxygenate them, so it’s not enough. The ECMO circuit does a lot the ventilator wouldn’t,” said Steele [professor of clinical practice of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • CU study to help determine whether vaccinated people can spread COVID

    Mar 29, 2021 by BizWest
    Brian Stauffer, director of the cardiovascular disease core curriculum at the Anschutz Medical Campus will help oversee a study on the CU Boulder campus to determine whether the Moderna vaccine can prevent transmission of COVID-19.…“Until we know how much vaccination protects you from infecting others, it is hard to know how much to relax restrictions and fully reopen things,” said co-principal investigator Stauffer, medical director of the CTRC and chief of cardiology at Denver Health Medical Center.
    Full story
  • How COVID-19 Will Help Denver Doctors Revolutionize Health Care

    Apr 1, 2021 by 5280
    As the medical director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Denver Health, Ivor Douglas [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] knows better than most how devastating a toll COVID-19 has taken. “We’ve lost 400,000 people, which is as many Americans as were lost in the Second World War,” he says. (The number topped 520,000 in early March.) “And we’ve done it in a year.”​
    Full story
  • Is Coffee Good for Us? Maybe Machine Learning Can Help Figure It Out.

    Mar 24, 2021 by The New York Times Magazine
    The Circulation study employed observational data, but its initial aim was not to assess the relationship between coffee and heart failure. This is how the lead author David Kao, a cardiologist at University of Colorado School of Medicine, characterized it to me: “The overall question was, What are the factors in daily life that impact heart health that we don’t know about that could potentially be changed to lower risk.”
    Full story
  • Does the COVID-19 vaccine really stop ‘long-COVID’?

    Mar 18, 2021 by Deseret News
    “The problem with COVID long-haulers is we really don’t understand the mechanism of their symptoms. We don’t think it’s related to the fact that they may have ongoing virus in their body since most of them have totally cleared the virus. And we don’t necessarily know if it’s related to a kind of antibody response,” said Anuj Mehta, who works in critical care medicine at Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Can You Exercise After Getting the COVID-19 Vaccine? Here’s What Experts Say

    Mar 18, 2021 by Health
    These side effects usually start within a day or two of getting the vaccine, the CDC says, and they might impact your ability to do daily activities, including working out. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Those common side effects are ultimately a sign that your immune system is responding to the vaccine, David Wyles, infectious disease specialist and head of infectious disease at Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells Health.
    Full story
  • How many COVID vaccine doses in Colorado have gone to waste?

    Mar 19, 2021 by 9News
    UCHealth is administering tens of thousands of doses a week and, so far, has tracked two doses they couldn’t use. One of which was accidentally dropped. Michelle Barron, with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine], said they treat the vaccines like liquid gold.
    Full story
  • Post a COVID Vaccine Selfie Or Not? Here’s What You Told Us

    Mar 19, 2021 by CPR News
    At UCHealth, one of the state’s biggest vaccinators, people are neither encouraged or discouraged from taking selfies. But, stresses infectious disease expert Michelle Barron, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine,] “we ask people to be polite when they do it. To make sure that people who are in the picture want to be in the picture.”
    Full story
  • 1B.4 vaccination group begins Friday, includes all Coloradans 50 and up to get the vaccine

    Mar 18, 2021 by Channel 7
    Vaccination group 1B.4 will begin receiving the COVID-19 vaccine on Friday, expanding the potential pool of recipients by millions of Coloradans....“It’s something that we’ve been working on for quite some time,” said Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • In Latinx Communities, Economic Insecurity, Immigration Fears, and Misinformation Fuel COVID-19 Disparities

    Mar 19, 2021 by Contagion Live
    Lilia Cervantes, of Denver Health and the University of Colorado, and colleagues, noted that Latinx people are more likely to be infected, hospitalized, and to die of COVID-19 compared to White individuals. In an effort to better understand the causes of the disparities, Cervantes and colleagues conducted semistructured interviews of 60 Latinx adults who were hospitalized in public hospitals in Denver and San Francisco between March and July 2020.
    Full story
  • Mark Earnest Appointed the Meiklejohn Endowed Chair of Medicine

    Mar 22, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    Mark Earnest, MD, division head of the Division of General Internal Medicine, has been appointed the Meiklejohn Endowed Chair of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Geoffrey Connors Appointed Vice Chair of Education

    Mar 22, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    Geoffrey R. Connors, MD, FACP has been appointed the Department of Medicine vice chair of education.
    Full story
  • Announcing 2022-23 Chief Medical Residents

    Mar 19, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    We're excited to announce the Chief Medical Residents for 2022-2023: Bradie Campbell, MD; Meryl Colton, MD; Tiffany Gardner, MD (CRQS); Dante Mesa, MD; Yunan Nie, MD; Cara Saxon, MD; Emily Scott, MD.
    Full story
  • A deeper look at our understanding of COVID vaccines and transmission

    Mar 17, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] said the studies, along with a general understanding of how vaccines work, have contributed to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updating their guidelines. “A little bit of both,” said Barron. “People shouldn’t be surprised things changed.” Barron added that decisions are being made as experts are gaining more understanding about the virus.
    Full story
  • COVID In Colorado: Mass Vaccination Sites Are The Goal As Next Vaccine Phase Approaches

    Mar 16, 2021 by CBS4
    “For the amount of planning that goes into this, staying two steps ahead is so important in terms of again making it easy,” said Michelle Barron, Director of Infection Prevention for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We want to make sure everyone has access, and to do that we want to be ready to go from the minute they say it’s time to go.”
    Full story
  • ‘Like you’re not all there’: Long-haul COVID-19 patients can’t seem to bounce back

    Mar 14, 2021 by Pueblo Chieftain
    “As time goes on, through the medical community there’s more and more opportunities to learn about this,” said Rebecca Keith, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who works in the hospital’s Center for Post-COVID-19 Care and Recovery. “Just like anything new, providers need to learn about it, reach out to other providers in the community and try to adjust their practice for patients who are suffering from this kind of long-haul COVID.”
    Full story
  • Weight loss linked to poorer survival outcomes in HER2-positive early breast cancer

    Mar 11, 2021 by Healio
    “Is our general advice to [patients with obesity or overweight] to exercise and lose weight wrong?” Anthony D. Elias, professor of medicine and medical oncology at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and member of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines Panel for Breast Cancer, who was not involved with the study, said in the release.
    Full story
  • Why do some people believe health misinformation?

    Mar 4, 2021 by Medical News Today
    Lead author Laura D. Scherer, with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains the implications of these findings: “Inaccurate information is a barrier to good healthcare because it can discourage people from taking preventive measures to head off illness and make them hesitant to seek care when they get sick. Identifying who is most susceptible to misinformation might lend considerable insight into how such information spreads and provide us with new avenues for intervention.”
    Full story
  • Denver hospital uses telehealth to keep COVID-19 patients out of ICU

    Mar 5, 2021 by Channel 7
    “Telehealth will be here to stay,” said Patrick Ryan, an internal medicine physician at Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. . . .“Before the pandemic started, we had not done any telehealth at all,” said Ryan. That changed within a matter of weeks for Ryan and his team at Denver Health. They’ve now had more than 200,000 appointments over the phone or on video chat since the pandemic started.
    Full story
  • U.S. initiative to understand long-hauler COVID-19 syndrome

    Mar 4, 2021 by CGTN
    Sarah Jolley [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] runs UCHealth’s post COVID clinic, one of at least 21 facilities run by U.S. hospitals and health systems currently treating people who suffer this way.
    Full story
  • Long-haul Covid patients can experience ‘waves of symptoms,’ early research suggests

    Mar 10, 2021 by NBC News
    Covid-19 symptoms are variable, but overall, the first few waves of symptoms — flu-like illness, gastrointestinal issues and neurologic symptoms — tend to mirror what a typical non-long-hauler patient would experience, said Rebecca Keith, an associate professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at National Jewish Health [and CU School of Medicine]. Keith is a co-director of National Jewish Health’s post-Covid-19 clinic.
    Full story
  • Your Healthy Family: Recovered COVID patient meets his convalescent plasma donors

    Mar 10, 2021 by KOAA (Pueblo)
    Thanks to a lot of cooperative behind-the-scenes work from Vitalant and UCHealth, Paul was introduced to his donors. One of them is Amos Bailey, a palliative care physician at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora and faculty member at the CU School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Doctors Say Do These 2 Things the Morning of Your Vaccine Appointment

    Mar 5, 2021 by Best Life
    “You want to follow your normal routine of making sure you’ve had something in your tummy," UCHealth's Medical Director of Infection Prevention [and Professor of Medicine at CU School of Medicine] Michelle Barron, told NBC affiliate 9News. The experts at Nebraska Medicine add that proper nutrition may be able to help combat any dizziness or lightheadedness that can occur in those nervous about getting the jab.
    Full story
  • CU med students are helping older Coloradans get vaccine appointments

    Mar 5, 2021 by Fox 31
    “We are very excited to spend time one by one, reaching out to our patients and we are using any means possible,” said Hillary Lum, a geriatrician at the clinic. She helped organize about 30 medical students to reach out directly to about 1,000 UCHealth patients, answer any vaccine questions they might have and help make their appointments.
    Full story
  • Should You Take Supplements to Reduce Cholesterol?

    Mar 2, 2021 by Health Central
    Red yeast rice extract—known commonly as “RYRE”—contains the same chemical, monacolin K, that is used in lovastatin, a prescription statin drug that prevents the body from producing cholesterol. As such, says Robert Eckel, an endocrinologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and former president of the American Heart Association, it should be treated as one and only used, if at all, under your doctor’s supervision.
    Full story
  • Exercise, Not Testosterone Therapy, Improves Artery Health in Middle-Aged and Older Men

    Mar 1, 2021 by Everyday Health
    The study results might look much different if researchers focused only on men with hypogonadism who would meet the clinical criteria for treatment with testosterone supplements, says Robert Eckel, past president of the American Heart Association and a professor emeritus at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • American Indians Have Highest Risk for Nonhemorrhagic Stroke

    Mar 3, 2021 by HealthDay
    José M. Sanchez, from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and colleagues examined the risk for nonhemorrhagic stroke among American Indians compared to Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project for all adult California residents receiving care from 2005 to 2011. Data were included for 16,951,579 patients followed for a median of 4.1 years.
    Full story
  • Study: Inaccurate information is a barrier to good health care, education

    Mar 1, 2021 by CBS4
    “Inaccurate information is a barrier to good health care because it can discourage people from taking preventive measures to head off illness and make them hesitant to seek care when they get sick,” said lead author Laura D. Scherer, with the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Colorado doctor featured on Golden Globes with actress Carey Mulligan

    Feb 28, 2021 by 9News
    Fernando Holguin has spent the last year treating COVID-19 patients – but on Sunday, Hollywood took a minute to honor health-care workers like him. "This year has been like no other. For those of you who are not in the hospital, you don’t see it every day like we do," Holguin said. “There’s a lot of really difficult, emotional moments being with these patients in the ICU and talking with their families.”
    Full story
  • Couple who had COVID last spring gets tested for antibodies and the results are surprising

    Mar 1, 2021 by Fox 31
    “Seeing this discordance between the two people is very much expected. One might have had milder disease, one might be older and one might be younger,” said Michelle Barron with UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Colorado’s “last responders” are exhausted after a year of coronavirus goodbyes

    Mar 1, 2021 by Colorado Sun
    At UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, Jon Treem [instructor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] is part of a team of palliative care specialists that treats patients with serious and complex illnesses, helping them manage symptoms to increase their quality of life.
    Full story
  • Inside ‘post-Covid’ clinics: How specialized centers are trying to treat long-haulers

    Mar 1, 2021 by NBC News
    Rebecca Keith, an associate professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at National Jewish Health [and CU School of Medicine], is a co-director of the facility's post-Covid-19 clinic....“It takes a multidisciplinary approach to try to help people," she said. "Hopefully, as time goes on, science will catch up and we'll have more to offer.”​ Sarah Jolley, a pulmonary and critical care specialist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], called for the medical community to create standardized definitions and guidelines of care.
    Full story
  • Estes Park woman tests positive for COVID-19 days before her 2nd Moderna vaccine dose

    Mar 2, 2021 by Fox 31
    “It’s the SARS-CoV-2 virus you get infected with but if you get sick, like shortness of breath, cough, lose your sense of taste or smell. That’s COVID19,” David Wyles, the Chief of Infectious Diseases at Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said.
    Full story
  • Can the COVID-19 vaccine end long-term symptoms?

    Mar 1, 2021 by Deseret News
    Anuj Mehta, professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told KDVR the COVID-19 vaccine is safe for those with long-term COVID-19 symptoms.
    Full story
  • COVID In Colorado: Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Adds To Arsenal In Coronavirus Battle

    Mar 2, 2021 by CBS4
    “It’s not apples and apples when we’re comparing across these trials,” said Thomas Campbell, chief clinical research officer for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • A year of COVID-19 in Colorado through the eyes of 2 doctors

    Mar 1, 2021 by Fox 31
    “We knew we were going to hit a big surge,” said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonologist [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who saw the sickest of those patients in the hospital’s intensive care unit. “We overwhelmed, I think, the people resources, but luckily we never ran out of hospital beds or ventilators,” Mehta said.
    Full story
  • Schools, travel industry say continued mask wearing possible in wake of pandemic

    Mar 3, 2021 by Fox 31
    “I think, unfortunately, COVID-19 is going to be with us for the long term,” Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention for UC Health said.
    Full story
  • COVID In Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis Envisions A ‘Very Close To Normal’ Summer

    Mar 2, 2021 by CBS4
    “I hope [Polis] is right. As far as concerts and 30 person barbecues, those kind of things, I just don’t know. I think a lot of that depends on what we do now. What we are doing now lays the foundation for that to even be a conversation,” said Michelle Barron, Sr. Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Kvaratskhelia Lab Discovers Human Protein that Regulates the HIV-1 Life Cycle

    Mar 3, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    Virologist and professor of medicine Mamuka Kvaratskhelia, PhD, and colleagues in the Division of Infectious Diseases have published in Nature Microbiology their discovery that a human cellular protein – Sec24c – critically regulates HIV-1. Sec24c, binds to the outer shell (capsid core) of an incoming virus and is necessary for proper infectivity.
    Full story
  • Could blind hiring improve diversity in the endocrine workforce?

    Feb 18, 2021 by Healio
    Column by Rocio Pereira, chief of endocrinology at Denver Health, associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and a former chair of the Endocrine Society Committee on Diversity and Inclusion: “To bring about significant change in the endocrine workforce, blind hiring/selection practices would need to be applied at every stage in the workforce development pipeline, starting from undergraduate and medical school training, through junior faculty and promotion to senior leadership.”
    Full story
  • Guys, Exercise Will Boost Your Aging Hearts, Testosterone Won’t: Study

    Feb 23, 2021 by HealthDay
    That thought was echoed by Robert Eckel, past president of the American Heart Association and immediate past president of medicine and science with the American Diabetes Association and a professor of medicine emeritus at the University of Colorado. “This trial was not [designed] to assess safety of testosterone,” he noted, leaving the question of whether taking testosterone replacement therapy might actually pose a heart risk unanswered.
    Full story
  • Weight Loss After HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer Diagnosis Associated With Worse Outcomes

    Feb 19, 2021 by Pharmacy Times
    “It was surprising to see that more than 5% weight loss at 2 years was associated with poorer distant disease-free survival,” said Anthony D. Elias, University of Colorado Cancer Center, a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines Panel for Breast Cancer, in the press release.
    Full story
  • Coffee may help reduce risk for heart failure

    Feb 19, 2021 by News-Review (Petoskey, Mich.)
    “The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising,” senior author David Kao said in a news release. Kao is an assistant professor of cardiology and medical director at the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Why Drinking More Coffee Could Reduce the Risk of Heart Failure

    Feb 23, 2021 by Men's Health
    “The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising,” summarized the author of the study David Kao, assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Coffee Drinking Tied to Lower Risk of Heart Failure

    Feb 18, 2021 by The New York Times
    “Usually, researchers pick things they suspect would be risk factors for heart failure — smoking, for example — and then look at smokers versus nonsmokers,” said the senior author, David P. Kao, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado. “But machine learning identifies variables that are predictive of either increased or decreased risk, but that you haven’t necessarily thought of.”
    Full story
  • Colorado sees “extraordinary” and “unprecedented” drop in flu during pandemic

    Feb 24, 2021 by Denver Post
    “I’ve never seen flu this low,” said Larissa Pisney, medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “This is certainly unprecedented.”
    Full story
  • Colorado Doctor: As COVID-19 Evolves, Vaccines May Need To Be Retooled

    Feb 19, 2021 by CBS4
    “We think less frequently than the flu and so I don’t know whether every year or every five years, but there’s probably going to be some sort of revaccination effort for COVID-19,” said David Beuther, associate professor of medicine at National Jewish Health [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Doctors say COVID-19 vaccine is safe for ‘long haulers’ despite lack of hard data

    Feb 24, 2021 by Fox 31
    Despite a lack of hard data on the effects of the vaccine on long haulers, Anuj Mehta, professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Denver Health, says there’s no reason to believe it isn’t safe for them.
    Full story
  • In Colorado, It’s A Race Between COVID-19 Variants And The COVID Vaccine

    Feb 24, 2021 by CPR News
    “I’m nervous about the variants,” said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonologist with National Jewish Health and Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], who serves on the Governor’s Expert Emergency Epidemic Response Committee. “I’m just concerned that the variants could potentially fuel another surge.”
    Full story
  • ‘We’re not there yet’: UCHealth doc says now is not the time to let our guard down

    Feb 19, 2021 by Fox 31
    “I will give everyone a sense of caution,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We don’t know when that next wave is going to come and we’re not at the point yet where we’re done with this.”
    Full story
  • COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations are still dropping. Can Colorado keep it up until enough are vaccinated?

    Feb 23, 2021 by Denver Post
    Photo: C. Lamont Smith, right, receives the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine from Hillary Lum [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] during the UCHealth COVID-19 vaccination clinic inside New Hope Baptist Church on Feb. 13, 2021 in Denver. UCHealth is coordinating with the church, the Center for African American Health, the NAACP and other organizations to distribute 750 vaccines to underserved and minority communities in the metro area.
    Full story
  • UCHealth has administered over 215,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses in Colorado

    Feb 22, 2021 by Fox 31
    “We want everyone, especially those in underserved and vulnerable communities, to have access to the COVID-19 vaccine. Minority communities have been disproportionately impacted during the pandemic,” said Jean Kutner, chief medical officer of University of Colorado Hospital and professor at the CU School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Statins Linked to Reduced Postop Adhesions, Bowel Obstruction

    Feb 11, 2021 by Medscape
    “Adhesion formation is the main underlying etiology of small bowl obstruction, and adhesions are responsible for significant morbidity and healthcare expenditures, with limited effective options at this time for preventing adhesion formation,” lead author Frank Scott, assistant professor of medicine, Crohn’s and Colitis Center, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.
    Full story
  • Drinking this many cups of coffee per day reduces heart attack risk by a third

    Feb 15, 2021 by Ladders
    “The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising,” says senior author David Kao from the University of Colorado in a media release. “Coffee and caffeine are often considered by the general population to be ‘bad’ for the heart because people associate them with palpitations, high blood pressure, etc.”
    Full story
  • Coffee Consumption Reduces Incident Heart Failure Risk, New Research Suggests

    Feb 15, 2021 by Sci News
    “While smoking, age and high blood pressure are among the most well-known heart disease risk factors, unidentified risk factors for heart disease remain,” said David Kao, a researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • What Side Effects To Expect From The COVID Vaccine (And Why It Still Beats Getting Sick)

    Feb 17, 2021 by CPR News
    Fernando Holguin, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Anschutz Medical Campus, said the studies reflect what he’s seen. “There were no hospitalizations related to these events and people recover in one to two days,” Holguin said. He said the symptoms pale in comparison to those who get hit hard with COVID-19. “You’re not going to land in the hospital, you’re not going to have shortness of breath,” Holguin said.
    Full story
  • Are you vaccinated? You still need to wear a mask and social distance, experts advise

    Feb 13, 2021 by Denver Post
    People may think they’re invincible with the vaccinations, but until 70% to 80% of people are vaccinated, the risk of spreading coronavirus remains, including the chance of exposure for others, said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention for UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Colorado’s top infectious disease expert answers your COVID-19 vaccine questions

    Feb 12, 2021 by Channel 7
    On Wednesday, we invited Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], to talk about the vaccine and answer some of your concerns surrounding the two vaccines currently available to the public.
    Full story
  • An Aurora clinic brings COVID-19 vaccine to communities at heightened risk

    Feb 13, 2021 by Rocky Mountain PBS
    At a community COVID-19 vaccination clinic, Fernando Holguin offered a stark message for those unsure about whether to get their shots. “I see patients in the intensive-care unit with COVID. I’ve seen many patients die,” he said. “You do not want to ever ... have to live through that or take that risk.” Holguin is a UCHealth doctor, University of Colorado medical professor and Mexican immigrant.
    Full story
  • First Immunotherapy Approved for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Feb 10, 2021 by Medpage Today
    “FDA approval of Libtayo will change the treatment paradigm for patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma,” Karl Lewis, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said in a statement from Sanofi and Regeneron.
    Full story
  • Black coffee can be good for your heart, studies show

    Feb 9, 2021 by CNN
    “The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising,” said senior author David Kao, medical director of the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Colorado Researchers Working On Better Ways To Detect COVID Variants

    Feb 11, 2021 by CBS4
    “We’ve just had so much infection and so much viral replication going on throughout the world, that eventually there’s going to be a change that’s going to be meaningful and that’s really what we’re starting to see,” said David Beuther, an associate professor of medicine at National Jewish Health [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Vaccine Guilt is Real. Here’s How to Deal, According to Local Ethicists

    Feb 8, 2021 by 5280
    There is not any data on the prevalence of vaccine guilt, but Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at University of Colorado’s Anschutz campus, surmises that many people who have already received the COVID-19 vaccine probably feel like their doses could have gone to someone more deserving. “I think it’s a really common phenomenon,” he says.
    Full story
  • Mayor Hancock Hosted Panel Discussing Vaccine Inequity

    Feb 8, 2021 by Out Front Magazine
    “We do have life-saving vaccines. These vaccines are important to saving individuals but they are also important to reduce the transmission” Carlos Franco-Paredes, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said. “For the Latino community, I would like to inform, I would like to inform everyone, as a healthcare worker, as a physician, as a Latino physician, I believe in these vaccines.”
    Full story
  • What can Colorado expect of the COVID variants?

    Feb 10, 2021 by 9News
    Michelle Barron, with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine], said virus mutations are expected. “Nature copies itself. It’s like handwriting,” she said. “It’s literally printing it out. At some point, it will make a mistake. The 100th time it copies itself, that mistake gets perpetuated, sometimes that’s meaningful. Sometimes it’s not.”
    Full story
  • Vaccine Q&A with Dr. Michelle Barron, Colorado’s top infectious disease expert

    Feb 7, 2021 by Channel 7
    Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], joined Denver7’s Jason Gruenauer to answer your questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.
    Full story
  • COVID In Colorado: Vaccine Reactions Similar To Other Vaccines

    Feb 6, 2021 by CBS4
    “You got something real, and it wasn’t the placebo,” echoed Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist at UCHealth Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I kind of scan our list every day to see what gets reported. Fatigue, headache, the sore arm of course. Some people including myself had muscle aches and body aches, but they lasted maybe six hours.”
    Full story
  • Black Church Leaders Help More People of Color Get Covid Vaccines, As Unequal Distribution Persists

    Feb 10, 2021 by Colorado Times Recorder
    Photo: The Rev. Timothy E. Tyler celebrated as elders received their COVID-19 vaccines at Colorado’s oldest Black church in Denver. He was speaking with Shanta Zimmer, an infectious disease expert at UCHealth and the University of Colorado School of Medicine who volunteered to give vaccines at the church on Sunday. Photo by Cyrus McCrimmon for UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Large-Scale Clinics Part Of Plan To Vaccinate Underserved Communities In Colorado

    Feb 8, 2021 by CPR News
    Photo: Ellis Linville, Sr., gets his second COVID-19 shot, from Sunita Sharma [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] at Shorter AME Church in Denver, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021.
    Full story
  • Guest Opinion: Working together to end homelessness

    Feb 1, 2021 by Colorado Springs Gazette
    Op-ed by Erik Wallace, an associate professor of Medicine and associate dean for the Colorado Springs branch at the University of Colorado School of Medicine: “We all need to do a better job of working together to address the challenges of homelessness and avoid the vitriol and criticism that has become too commonplace and accepted in society today.”
    Full story
  • LGBT Care for Older Adults and Serious Illness: Podcast with Carey Candrian & Angela Primbas

    Jan 28, 2021 by GeriPal
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older adults have lived through a lifetime of discrimination, social stigma, prejudice, and marginalization. Is the care that we are giving them in later life changing any of that or are we pushing them back into the closet? This is what we talk about in this week’s podcast with Carey Candrian from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Angela Primbas from Stanford University (and future geriatrics fellow at UCSF).
    Full story
  • Endocrine groups: Evidence-based policies needed to support transgender health care access

    Jan 28, 2021 by Healio
    “The media attention impacts the stress levels of my patients,” Sean Iwamoto, assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center, and co-chair of the Endocrine Society’s Transgender Research and Medicine Special Interest Group, told Healio.
    Full story
  • Study: Doctors’ negative views of disabled patients affect quality of care

    Feb 4, 2021 by Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    “Our results clearly raise concern about the ability of the health care system to ensure equitable care for people with disability,” added senior author Eric G. Campbell, professor of medicine and director of research for the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • What Your Summer Vacation Might Look Like This Year

    Feb 2, 2021 by Real Simple
    “The key is to remember to wear your mask around others, pay attention to cleaning of surfaces, and try to limit your activities to areas that are well ventilated or outdoors,” says Michelle Barron, UCHealth senior medical director of infection prevention and control [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Experts Now Recommend Double Masking to Prevent the Spread of COVID – Here’s How to Do It Right

    Jan 28, 2021 by Real Simple
    “Both of these types of masks have the ability to prevent transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19,” so you wouldn't need to double mask if you use one of these, says Michelle Barron, UCHealth senior medical director of infection prevention and control [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • UCHealth hopes to recruit more people of color for vaccine trial

    Jan 28, 2021 by 9News
    It’s why Jose Castillo-Mancilla, associate professor of medicine, is working to recruit more people of color for UCHealth’s third vaccine trial.
    Full story
  • How should you talk to vaccine-skeptical family? These experts have some tips

    Feb 3, 2021 by Denver Gazette
    Others may want to see data or have harder reassurances, said Michelle Barron, a senior medical director and infectious disease expert at UCHealth. Still more just want to wait it out for a few months.
    Full story
  • Life after the COVID vaccine: The science behind why ‘normal’ can’t start again right now

    Feb 4, 2021 by 9News
    “After the first dose of the vaccine, depending on which one you get, there is a little bit of a difference but you are not at the 95% range [of immunity],” said Michelle Barron from UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine]. “You are somewhere between 50 to 70 percent potentially protected, which means you can get COVID in-between vaccines.”
    Full story
  • After a Rocky Start, Novavax Vaccine Could Be Here by Summer

    Feb 3, 2021 by The New York Times
    Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], who is overseeing the trial site at UCHealth in Colorado, said he has received more than 2,000 emails and hundreds of calls from would-be volunteers.
    Full story
  • Second Shot In Clinical Trial Of Novavax COVID Vaccine Comes With A Dose Of Confidence

    Feb 3, 2021 by CBS4
    “It’s very positive,” said Thomas Campbell, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] lead investigator for the trial site on the Anschutz Medical Campus. So far, 216 people are enrolled at Anschutz. The goal is 30,000 participants over 115 sites in the U.S. and Mexico.
    Full story
  • As state prepares to vaccinate teachers, older Coloradans and essential workers frustrated by lack of appointments

    Feb 3, 2021 by Denver Post
    Who gets the vaccine first doesn’t necessarily reflect who wants it most, because people who don’t have internet access or the time to make many phone calls are less likely to successfully navigate the sign-up system, said Matt Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at University of Colorado’s Anschutz campus.
    Full story
  • Q&A: Why future doctors must learn Holocaust’s awful lessons

    Jan 26, 2021 by AMA
    In an interview, AMA member Matthew K. Wynia, professor of medicine and public health and director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado in Aurora, explored why the medical profession’s role in the Holocaust is essential learning for medical students in 2021.
    Full story
  • Many LGBTQ Seniors Don’t Get The Health And End-Of-Life Care They Need. Some Coloradans Are Working To Change That

    Jan 22, 2021 by CPR News
    That’s common for older LGBTQ adults, said Carey Candrian, an assistant professor and researcher at the University of Colorado. And many feel isolated, she added. “And I just get chills when I say that, because I think for people who don't identify as LGBT, I think it's so easy to forget the work that hiding requires,” Candrian said.
    Full story
  • Diabetes prevention program saving lives during COVID-19 crisis

    Jan 25, 2021 by WTKR (Norfolk, Va.)
    “Outcomes related to hospitalizations for COVID-19, admission to the intensive care unit in need for assisted ventilation and death is two to three times higher than people who live with diabetes than those who don’t,” said Robert Eckel, a current professor of medicine with the University of Colorado, Anschutz and former president of the American Diabetes Association.
    Full story
  • What Americans need to know about finding a coronavirus test abroad

    Jan 27, 2021 by Washington Post
    David Beuther, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health, a leading respiratory hospital, [and an assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] echoed those concerns. Not only will the situation vary from place to place, but it’s also in constant flux.
    Full story
  • 22-year-old COVID ‘long hauler’ fights symptoms 11 months after infection

    Jan 23, 2021 by Fox 31
    “This is a real phenomenon but we’re still trying to understand exactly who it happens to and why it happens to particular patients,” said Sarah Jolley, director of the clinic [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Jolley says they often see long-term symptoms in young patients who were in good health before COVID-19. Symptoms typically include exercise intolerance, fatigue, shortness of breath and persistent cough.
    Full story
  • UCHealth Working With What’s Being Given, But Aims To Vaccinate More Coloradans On Large Scale Soon

    Jan 26, 2021 by CBS4
    “We’re excited about the mass vaccine event,” explained Jean Kutner, UCHealth’s chief medical officer. “And as we are issuing invitations to make vaccine events we’re giving them the choice because we want people to be able to access whatever location is more convenient for them.”
    Full story
  • While ill effects of 2nd COVID shot are stronger, front-line workers say it’s better than the alternative

    Jan 26, 2021 by Denver Gazette
    “It’s not pleasant for most people but it’s not going to kill them either,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “With all vaccines, you look at the risks and the benefits. The risk of getting COVID is still pretty high and the benefit of getting this vaccine is that it will probably prevent you from getting COVID, or if you do get the virus, it will be significantly milder.”
    Full story
  • UCHealth unblinds Moderna COVID-19 vaccine participants

    Jan 25, 2021 by 9News
    “They are still very committed to the trial and are still very much willing to continue to participate in the trial,” said Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who oversees the trial at UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Wealthier and whiter neighborhoods in Denver have higher vaccinations rates

    Jan 22, 2021 by Denverite
    [UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital] Chief Medical Officer Jean Kutner said the hospital is hosting vaccination clinics at places where certain communities already congregate. On Sunday, the hospital vaccinated nearly 250 people at the Shorter Community AME Church in Denver, which serves predominantly Black parishioners. UCHealth hosted a similar vaccination clinic at Salud Family Health Center in Aurora on Jan. 14 and 15, helping vaccinate about 500 people.
    Full story
  • Coloradans ‘Should Be Proud’ Of Declining COVID Cases, Hospitalizations

    Jan 26, 2021 by CBS4
    “We’ve done a good job of listening to what we’re supposed to do: wearing masks, washing our hands, maintaining social distancing,” said Marc Moss, Director of Critical Care for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I think maintaining those requirements is probably why we’re seeing fewer cases.”
    Full story
  • Passing of Dr. Robert W. Schrier, Former Chair of Medicine

    Jan 25, 2021 by Department of Medicine
    It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Robert W. Schrier. Dr. Schrier was the past Department of Medicine Chair for 26 years, from 1976 to 2002 as well as the Head of the Division of Nephrology from 1972 to 1992.
    Full story
  • Expanded editorial board provides a wider lens on important issues in nephrology

    Jan 19, 2021 by Healio
    Nephrology News & Issues has also added to its Editorial Advisory Board members who represent the many aspects of nephrology and the communities served. Lilia Cervantes, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who has studied access to dialysis care for illegal immigrants and historically underserved communities, has joined the board.
    Full story
  • Gov. Polis assures second doses of COVID-19 vaccine will be available on schedule

    Jan 19, 2021 by 9News
    Thomas Campbell, chief clinical research officer at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said he encourages people to get the second dose of the vaccine as soon as it’s available to them. Campbell said there’s very little information on the efficacy for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines if only a single dose is given.
    Full story
  • Experts debate the effectiveness of a single does versus a double dose of the COVID-19 vaccine

    Jan 15, 2021 by Channel 7
    “That is what has been proposed in the United Kingdom,” said Thomas Campbell, chief clinical research officer for UCHealth. Let’s start there. Yes, the U.K., for example, is now suggesting a second dose at the end of 12 weeks. But Dr. Campbell points out that’s the AstraZeneca vaccine, which is different from what’s approved in the U.S.
    Full story
  • Online sign-ups complicate vaccine rollout for older people

    Jan 15, 2021 by Fox23 (Tulsa, Okla.)
    Jean Kutner, chief medical officer of UCHealth University at Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said she’s volunteering at a clinic hosted by a church that brings in the vaccine and helps build trust between health care workers and residents. For now, UCHealth schedules appointments online, but Kutner said a COVID-19 hotline is in the works because of the volume of calls from seniors.
    Full story
  • A Blip, Not A Surge: How Colorado Dodged A Holiday Coronavirus Tsunami

    Jan 19, 2021 by CPR News
    For weeks, Abbey Lara has been watching COVID-19 patients in the intensive care beds in her Aurora hospital, wondering when the next crush of the extremely sick would arrive. “I’m pleased to say we are not seeing the huge surge I think we were all somewhat anticipating,” said Lara, who treats pulmonary and critical care patients in the COVID-19 section of the ICU ward at University of Colorado Hospital, one of the state’s biggest and busiest.​ The arrival of vaccines should now give people hope, but they’ll need to keep their guard up, said Sunita Sharma, a pulmonary and critical care medicine physician at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. “I think there is definitely light at the end of the tunnel,” she said. “I just don’t want people to give up that level of vigilance, because I think that's what's keeping our numbers in check right now.”
    Full story
  • Convalescent plasma isn’t quite the coronavirus miracle treatment it was supposed to be. What happened?

    Jan 11, 2021 by Colorado Sun
    “The hope was that it would help patients recover faster … it would help them get better faster or prevent their disease from progressing,” said Tim Jenkins, an infectious disease doctor at Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] whose job is to evaluate potential therapies for COVID-19 patients. “None of these recent studies have shown that.” Still, patients hospitalized with the coronavirus are sometimes “very passionate” about receiving the plasma because they’ve heard about it in the news, said David Beckham, a University of Colorado physician and researcher who is studying the neurological effects of COVID-19.
    Full story
  • New COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial opens in Colorado

    Jan 11, 2021 by 9News
    “We don’t know if this vaccine protects against COVID illness, and that’s the purpose of the phase 3 study, is to evaluate a vaccine for efficacy,” Thomas Campbell, UCHealth’s Chief Clinical Research Officer [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told 9NEWS.
    Full story
  • New COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial opens in Colorado

    Jan 11, 2021 by Fox 31
    Jean Kutner, the chief medical officer [at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says the Novavax vaccine works differently than the others. It uses a spike protein made in a lab to create antibodies. “It has shown very good response in terms of being able to create that immune response,” Kutner said.
    Full story
  • Long-term care facilities express concern over ‘vaccine hesitancy’ among staff

    Jan 13, 2021 by Colorado Politics
    University of Colorado bioethicist Matthew Wynia says he has done a breakdown to learn more about the people who are refusing the vaccination. “It tends to not be the clinicians,” he said. “It’s not the doctors and nurses. It’s the MAs and front desk and folks. And maybe, more importantly, these are people who have less control over their schedule, who may not be able to take time off, or are able to get child care.”
    Full story
  • Study: College Football Players Underestimate Risk of Concussion and Injury

    Jan 5, 2021 by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education
    “Our study doesn’t answer the question of why football athletes tend to underestimate their risks of injury or concussion,” said Christine Baugh, an assistant professor of medicine at the Center for Bioethics and Humanities, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Study: College football players underestimate risk of concussion

    Jan 4, 2021 by Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    “That athletes underestimated their risk of concussion and injury in this study raises important ethical considerations,” wrote Christine Baugh, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the CU Center for Bioethics and Humanities. “What is the threshold for college athletes to be sufficiently informed of the risks and benefits of football to make decisions that align with their values and preferences?”
    Full story
  • Sicker-At-Work? Persistent Economic Factors Drive Higher COVID-19 Infection Rate in Weld County’s Latinos

    Jan 4, 2021 by KUNC
    “Not to generalize, but in the communities where we were seeing this occurring — and not just the Latino community, but kind of the people of color overall — their job positions put them in places where they could not socially isolate,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of Infection Prevention for the University of Colorado hospital system [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • A look at the long-term impacts of COVID-19 for seniors

    Dec 30, 2020 by 9News
    Lung scarring, fatigue, chest and muscle pain and intermittent fever are among the long-term side effects that could be caused by COVID-19, particularly in seniors. That's according to Thomas Campbell, who specializes in internal medicine and infectious disease at University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Nine months in, Denver hospitals can better help COVID-19 patients thanks to “unprecedented” advances in care

    Jan 4, 2021 by Denver Post
    When COVID-19 was found in December 2019 in China, doctors and scientists had to make guesses about what treatments might help, said Ivor Douglas, a pulmonologist and intensive care specialist at Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Usually, that meant trying drugs that worked against similar conditions, he said.
    Full story
  • Easy-to-Spread Covid Variant in U.S. Amps Up Vaccine Urgency

    Jan 4, 2021 by Bloomberg
    “I suspect it’s more widespread than we know,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth, a health-care system with a dozen hospitals and hundreds of clinics in Colorado. “It’s a function of ‘if you look for it, you will find it.’”
    Full story
  • ‘Not Surprised’: Colorado Doctor Says New Strain Of COVID-19 Shouldn’t Cause Alarm

    Dec 30, 2020 by 9News
    “I’m not surprised,” said Michelle Barron, Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Now that it’s in Colorado, it’s probably in more locations and we just haven’t detected it yet, but that won’t be a surprise and shouldn’t cause alarm.”
    Full story
  • Early vaccination in prisons, a public health priority, proves politically charged

    Jan 2, 2021 by Washington Post
    “It’s a very stigmatized population, and there are people who say, ‘They’re in prison, they must have done something terrible, and they don’t deserve a place in line,’” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado and a member of the state’s medical advisory group. But viewing the priorities in terms of who deserves to be inoculated, he said, “might end up prolonging the pandemic and killing more people.”
    Full story
  • Who’s Next? Colorado’s COVID-19 Vaccine Plan Creates Confusion For Most, Competition For Some

    Jan 5, 2021 by CPR News
    One reason some areas have been able to move forward more quickly than others is that, due to inaccurate employment information on health care workers, some counties got more of the vaccine than they need for the earliest groups, according to Anuj Mehta [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] of Denver Health who chairs the group that advises the governor on vaccine allocation.
    Full story
  • UCHealth patients over 70 start getting vaccinated

    Jan 4, 2021 by Fox 31
    Jean Kutner, the Chief Medical Officer at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says healthcare workers share that same hope. “Hope that every shot in an arm we get is one less patient we will see in that COVID critical care unit,” Kutner said.
    Full story
  • Eligible patients still looking for answers on COVID-19 vaccine

    Jan 3, 2021 by Fox 31
    “It gives them information on the locations, times that they can potentially come and it’s still by appointment only. People should not be showing up hoping that they’ll get a vaccine,” said Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID in Colorado: Despite Vaccines Available for 70+, Getting The Shot May Be Challenging

    Dec 31, 2020 by CBS4
    “Unfortunately, nothing this year has been that easy,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of Infection Prevention for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Since Polis’ announcement, receptionists at UCHealth have been inundated with phone calls asking for the vaccine. “Our switchboards are going crazy,” Barron told CBS4’s Dillon Thomas.
    Full story
  • UCHealth doctor urges patience as state enters next vaccine phase

    Dec 30, 2020 by Fox 31
    “It’s well-intended. They want people to get the vaccine. There’s obviously a lot of interest but I think it’s more complicated than people realize,” said Michelle Barron, head of infection prevention with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] ....“People are excited to qualify but we don’t have enough vaccine to be able to say, ‘Sure, come on in.’ The process will be very driven by having an appointment and a specified time.”
    Full story
  • Understanding Treatment Options for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Dec 24, 2020 by CURE
    It is one of the most common types of leukemias in adults; however, the disease comprises only about 1% of all cancers. There are a variety of treatment options available for patients with AML, with more clinical trials evaluating new therapies in the pipeline. In this episode of the “CURE talks Cancer” podcast, we spoke with Dan Pollyea, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about these treatment options.
    Full story
  • Frontline Health Workers Are First Up For Vaccines. But Medical Residents Say They’ve Fallen Through The Cracks

    Dec 23, 2020 by CPR News
    Over the course of the first week of vaccinations, the four hospitals worked to get residents vaccinated sooner. Shanta Zimmer senior associate dean of Medical Education who also works as an infectious disease specialist at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus said in an email that as of Dec. 19, at least 1,134 residents had received invitations.
    Full story
  • UCHealth pilot program delivers COVID vaccine to lucky patients

    Dec 28, 2020 by Fox 31
    Jean Kutner, the chief medical officer, says a few dozen existing patients over the age of 75 who had My Health Connection patient portal accounts were randomly selected for the pilot program..... She says once Governor Jared Polis and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment give the green light to vaccinate patients over the age of 75, her system will be ready. “I think a lot of us really feel a lot of hope now,” Kutner said.
    Full story
  • UCHealth doc ‘cautiously optimistic’ about COVID-19 trends at the end of holiday season

    Dec 26, 2020 by Fox 31
    “It is very much on our minds about the potential post-holiday surge. I would say that we’re not going to breathe easy and really feel that we’ve turned a corner until probably three weeks into January,” said Jean Kutner, Chief Medical Officer at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Alarming New Side Effects of Eating Too Much Sugar, Says Study

    Dec 21, 2020 by Eat This, Not That!
    “We present evidence that fructose, by lowering energy in cells, triggers a foraging response similar to what occurs in starvation,” notes lead study author Richard Johnson, professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • How my mom saved my life after doctors missed my brain bleed

    Dec 18, 2020 by WHYY
    “I think there’s no doubt from what you’ve said that what you experienced would probably be classified as a medical mistake or a medical error. It’s the kind of error we would call a ‘diagnostic delay,’” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center of Bioethics and Humanities at University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Lasting COVID-19 side effects force patients to change their diets, lifestyles

    Dec 18, 2020 by Fox 31
    Parosmia is a condition where a person experiences a distortion of their sense of smell. David Beckham, a neuro-infectious disease expert with UCHealth [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says a form of this a neurological side effect of COVID-19 is commonly found in larger studies.
    Full story
  • Health officials urge public’s patience in the wait for a COVID-19 vaccine

    Dec 22, 2020 by 9News
    “If you work at a grocery store or you work at one of these places or you’re a teacher even like how would we know?” said University of Colorado Hospital’s infectious disease expert, Michelle Barron.
    Full story
  • ‘We need to stay the course’: Denver leaders urge caution as COVID-19 numbers decline

    Dec 18, 2020 by 9News
    The decrease doesn’t necessarily mark a trend, according to infectious disease specialist Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “A week is probably not long enough for us to really declare this a true trend. It’s hopeful. Certainly, I think we’d all take the news that we’re declining,” Barron, who also practices for UCHealth, said.
    Full story
  • Masks, Social Distancing For COVID Prevention Contribute To Fewer Flu Cases In Colorado

    Dec 18, 2020 by CBS4
    “So far it’s been very mild. We have seen very few flu cases, very few hospitalizations if any, I don’t even know if we have had a hospitalization from flu yet,” said Michelle Barron, Senior Medical Director of infection of prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • ‘It was miraculous’: Fort Collins man sees positive results from experimental treatment at UCHealth

    Dec 21, 2020 by 9News
    “Typically, the patients who qualify have to meet all of the requirements, which are comorbidities like diabetes, or heart disease, or over the age of 65,” Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told 9NEWS. Colorado’s Department of Public Health said it got 1,130 doses on Dec. 2 and another 960 on Dec. 9, a small amount for a state that has daily covid numbers in the thousands. “It’s supply chain, honestly,” Chief Medical Officer at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital Jean Kutner [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said.
    Full story
  • West Metro Firefighters In Moderna Vaccine Trial Anxious to Get The ‘Real Deal’ If They Were Given The Placebo

    Dec 21, 2020 by CBS4
    “We enrolled 217 participants,” said Thomas Campbell, principal investigator for the Stage 3 Moderna vaccine clinical trial at UCHealth on the CU Anschutz campus, one of 99 sites. “We have an obligation now that we know the vaccine works to provide it to those people. That’s my personal view,” said Campbell.
    Full story
  • Thousands of Moderna COVID vaccine doses headed to locations across Colorado

    Dec 21, 2020 by Fox 31
    The 67-year-old does not know if he received the vaccine or a placebo. He reported having side effects after the second dose of some soreness and flu like symptoms, which Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] says are common. “This is the way we can say for certain whether a vaccine works or not.”
    Full story
  • FAQ: What Coloradans need to know about COVID-19 vaccines

    Dec 19, 2020 by Denver Post
    In making recommendations on who should receive vaccine first, the goal is to save the most lives, end the pandemic and maintain critical societal functions, said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Denver Health and National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • ‘It feels like a turning point’

    Dec 17, 2020 by Highlands Ranch Herald
    With a nearly full ICU, the hospital is working to ensure clinical care is remaining high while staff receives inoculations, with some recipients having minor side effects like a temporary fever or flu-like symptoms. “It’s a monumental feat from a logistics perspective,” said Tom Purcell, chief medical officer at the hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We look at it every single day, the ICU coverage is at a critical level right now.”
    Full story
  • New Research Support Program Announced for Early Career Investigators

    Dec 18, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine announces a new research support program for early career investigators, whose research careers have been affected by COVID-19. The department will provide $50,000 for salary support to extend active and eligible Mentored Career Development Awards for six months.
    Full story
  • Women rally around Jill Biden after controversial op-ed calls for future first lady to drop ‘Dr.’

    Dec 14, 2020 by ABC News
    “Today I added “Dr” to my profile name. Thanks WSJ for the nudge,” wrote Dr. Laura Scherer, an assistant professor [of medicine in the Division of Cardiology] at the University of Colorado Medical School.
    Full story
  • Food Industry-Backed Research Gives Results Funders Want, New Analysis Shows

    Dec 16, 2020 by Scientific American
    “Industry is more likely to fund research that is likely to show the benefits of their product or detract from [its] harms,” says Lisa Bero, a pharmacologist at the University of Colorado who studies research bias. “The problem with that is that those might not be the most important health questions.”
    Full story
  • Some Colorado hospitals using lottery system to pick patients for experimental COVID-19 treatment

    Dec 16, 2020 by 9News
    “Typically, the patients who qualify have to meet all of the requirements, which are comorbidities like diabetes, or heart disease, or over the age of 65,” Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth, said.
    Full story
  • What will life look like after a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Dec 10, 2020 by 9News
    With the help of infectious disease specialists from UCHealth and Denver Health, we explored what life could look like after people start getting vaccinated for COVID-19. Here is part of our conversation with Michelle Barron of UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], and David Wyles from Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Routt County is ready for the first vaccines

    Dec 13, 2020 by Steamboat Pilot & Today
    Michelle Barron, senior medical director for infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], noted everything at this time is still an estimate — actual numbers will be known upon actual arrivals. The operations and logistics are complex, she said, and along with the vaccines, must come the supplies required to actually administer them. There’s also a lot of paperwork.
    Full story
  • How does Moderna’s vaccine compare to Pfizer’s?

    Dec 15, 2020 by Fox 31
    “There are more similarities than there are differences,” said UCHealth Chief Clinical Research Officer Thomas Campbell. Campbell was heavily involved in Moderna’s trial in Colorado, and said there was a high interest in participation, which greatly helped.
    Full story
  • Colorado researchers contribute to the fight against COVID-19

    Dec 7, 2020 by Channel 7
    “I think one of the things that has struck me in this effort is the really incredible public support for these trials,” said Thomas Campbell, Chief Clinical Research Officer for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • What’s It Like To Be In A COVID-19 Vaccine Trial? This Colorado Couple Shares Their Experience

    Dec 16, 2020 by CPR News
    Thomas Campbell, a professor of infectious disease at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the lead investigator at the UCHealth trial site, said among the people who got sick after receiving the vaccine, they were less likely to develop severe symptoms. “We don’t yet know whether these vaccines prevent transmission to other individuals,” he said. “That’s something we will learn in the coming months.”
    Full story
  • “The end is in sight”: Colorado administers first COVID-19 vaccines to frontline health care workers

    Dec 14, 2020 by Denver Post
    “As vaccines come out we can’t be lax on the public health measures,” said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Denver Health and National Jewish Heath [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “It’s going to be months before we are able to get back to a closer semblance of normal.”
    Full story
  • Colorado health officials, providers discuss first few days of administering COVID vaccine

    Dec 16, 2020 by Channel 7
    “Everybody’s so excited. There’s like this energized feeling throughout the building now where everybody is just feeling like maybe there’s light at the end of the tunnel coming,” said Michelle Barron, the UCHealth Infection Prevention senior medical director.
    Full story
  • Should you skip the vaccine if you’ve had COVID-19? Doctors say no.

    Dec 15, 2020 by Fox 31
    “There’s probably a window where you’re protected against getting infected, but it’s not a lifelong thing,” says Michelle Barron. Barron says immunity gradually goes down over time, potentially lasting as little as three months.
    Full story
  • ‘The eagle has arrived’: State health leaders excited over COVID vaccines, encourage others to get it

    Dec 16, 2020 by 9News
    When asked about the fear many have expressed over the new vaccines, UCHealth Infection Prevention Senior Medical Director [and CU Professor of Medicine] Michelle Barron said, “as physicians, we need to show we are getting it, the community needs to show they are getting it.” Barron added that it’s critical for health care workers to understand what people’s concerns are and address them.
    Full story
  • Hospitals finalizing COVID-19 vaccination plans with doses expected to arrive in days

    Dec 12, 2020 by Fox 31
    Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says they weren’t entirely sure how many doses they would receive until the official announcement from the state. “We had no idea what to anticipate. We were just hopeful we were going to and we were hoping that we would have enough for what is now the 1A grouping,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • The Athlete’s Guide to Menopause

    Dec 8, 2020 by Outside
    “You have to try to prevent the loss of muscle and bone, and while cardio will make your heart and lungs fitter, it won’t increase—and might not even prevent—loss of muscle mass,” says Wendy Kohrt, an exercise physiologist and a professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado [School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • High Blood Sugar Can Increase COVID-19 Risk, Even Without Diabetes

    Dec 4, 2020 by Verywell Health
    “This study is similar to what we were seeing before COVID-19 in regards to hyperglycemia contributing to poor outcomes,” Cecilia C. Low Wang, professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, metabolism, and diabetes, at the University Of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus School Of Medicine, tells Verywell. “But the big question now is whether COVID-19 is causing hyperglycemia. This virus brings all sorts of complications.”
    Full story
  • Which Coloradans should receive the coronavirus vaccine first? The answer depends on who you ask.

    Dec 7, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “We created this monster to some extent,” said Matthew Wynia, the director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. He is firmly in the public health camp. But he said some of the ethical discussions surrounding vaccine allocation priorities focused on reciprocity.
    Full story
  • Denver Officers Among 217 Participants in UCHealth Moderna Vaccine Trial

    Dec 9, 2020 by CBS4
    “It’s not just rolling up your sleeve and getting the injection,” said Thomas Campbell, Chief Clinical Research Officer at UCHealth. Campbell runs the trial for UCHealth and says the Denver officers’ jobs, as well as diverse backgrounds and ages make them good candidates. “We wanted to enroll participants who because of their work, their occupation, where they live, they were at increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 exposure,” Campbell said.
    Full story
  • Denver officer, police chief enroll in COVID vaccine trial

    Dec 4, 2020 by 9News
    Thomas Campbell, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who is heading the COVID vaccine trial at UCHealth, said he leaped at Pazen’s offer because police officers were exactly the type of people they were hoping to enroll. “We wanted to enroll people who, because of their occupations, were at increased risk of exposure,” Campbell said.
    Full story
  • Q&A: Colorado physicians urge against panic after 2 people in the UK report allergic reaction

    Dec 9, 2020 by 9News
    After two healthcare workers experienced an allergic reaction from the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, Britain regulators are warning individuals with a history of severe allergic reactions against receiving the vaccine. “First, this is not unexpected. We know virtually any vaccine, any medicine can cause an allergic reaction,” Thomas Campbell of UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] told 9NEWS.
    Full story
  • Supply chain will have major impact on vaccine timelines

    Dec 9, 2020 by Fox 31
    “This is probably a more realistic timeline, and if people get it sooner, people will be happy,” said Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I think the key is the supply chains and that’s ultimately what’s going to determine whether those timelines are that far out or potentially sooner.”
    Full story
  • Explainer-I Just got a COVID-19 vaccine. Now what?

    Dec 8, 2020 by Reuters
    “As with all vaccines, it may work really great in certain patient subsets, but not as well in others ... Does that mean you are free to hop on a plane or have 30 people over at your house? Probably not,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director for infection prevention at Colorado’s UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Tough Decisions Being Made As Colorado COVID Vaccine Distribution Set To Begin Possibly By Week’s End

    Dec 7, 2020 by CBS4
    “In terms of figuring who gets it first the state will be offering guidance to us in terms of the phases — who they think is appropriate and how they go about that. So I think ultimately it will be not as difficult as it might appear to be on the surface,” said Michelle Barron, infectious disease specialist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • COVID-19 vaccine challenges resemble what health care workers faced with H1N1 pandemic

    Dec 3, 2020 by Fox 31
    “We didn’t know when we were going to get it, we didn’t know how much we were going to get and then we didn’t know who would actually take the vaccine if they received the shipments,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • State health department names 16 places with ultra-cold freezers to store COVID-19 vaccine

    Dec 2, 2020 by Fox 31
    “It’s a big operation but I think lots of really smart people have been working on this,” said UCHealth Medical Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “It’s going to be sent to us in shipments and over time, there will be enough for everybody.”
    Full story
  • New COVID Treatment Bamlanivimab Could Help Death, Hospitalization Rates

    Dec 4, 2020 by CBS4
    “It’s a little bit different of a mechanism in that it actually again still affects replication,” said Michelle Barron, infectious disease specialist at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] in Aurora. “But it binds to the part of the proteins on the surface of the virus itself.”
    Full story
  • Colorado sees dramatic decrease in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

    Dec 7, 2020 by 9News
    “We are very happy for the reprieve, if you will,” said Darlene Tad-y, the vice president of clinical affairs for the Colorado Hospital Association and a practicing hospitalist at UCHealth University of Colorado hospital in Aurora. “It’s given our hospital members, the staff within our hospital members, a little bit of breathing room.”​
    Full story
  • Health care workers brace for anticipated post-holiday COVID-19 surge

    Dec 6, 2020 by Fox 31
    “We are preparing as if we are going to continue having a spike in cases really all the way through January, by the time you take into account Thanksgiving and Christmas,” said Jean Kutner, Chief Medical Officer at University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Trump and Friends Got Coronavirus Care Many Others Couldn’t

    Dec 9, 2020 by The New York Times
    Matthew Wynia, director of the Center of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado, said that giving the powerful access was patently unfair. “That’s one of the reasons why we decided that we would allocate this only through the state and only through this random allocation process,” he said, “so that no one could get a leg up by virtue of their special connections.”
    Full story
  • Nationwide Collaborative Study to Determine Factors that Predict Disease Severity and Long-Term Health Impacts Of COVID-19

    Dec 10, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are part of the NIH-funded study, the Collaborative Cohort of Cohorts for COVID-19 Research (C4R) Study, which includes 37 academic medical centers across the country.
    Full story
  • Venus figurines offered a model for surviving climate change, new theory says

    Dec 1, 2020 by UPI
    “Some of the earliest art in the world are these mysterious figurines of overweight women from the time of hunter gatherers in Ice Age Europe where you would not expect to see obesity at all,” lead study author Richard Johnson said in a news release. “We show that these figurines correlate to times of extreme nutritional stress,” said Johnson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • What’s the Best Exercise for People with HIV Over 50?

    Nov 26, 2020 by POZ
    Joining her is Kristine Erlandson, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who specializes in infectious diseases. “Our findings in previous research suggest that an innovative approach to exercise is needed to improve physical function, reduce fatigue and to maintain a long-term exercise habit among older people with HIV,” [Allison] Webel [associate professor at Case Western Reserve University] said in a press release about the grant.
    Full story
  • 26-year-old Colorado Springs woman diagnosed with blood clots after COVID-19

    Nov 29, 2020 by Fox 31
    Todd Bull, a pulmonologist with UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine], says there is still a lot to learn about how blood clots occur in COVID-19 patients. “Increased blood clotting surround COVID-19 infections seems to be very real, we’re studying this still,” Bull said. “It’s sort of this fascinating aspect that we have not seen in other viral infections.”
    Full story
  • Here is when the average healthy Coloradan could get vaccinated

    Dec 1, 2020 by Fox 31
    Thomas Campbell, the chief clinical research officer for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said, “If we can get to 80 percent vaccination or even something slightly lower than that, there are some models that suggest that that may be able to provide us with protective herd immunity.”
    Full story
  • Some Health Care Workers Are Wary Of Getting COVID-19 Vaccines

    Dec 1, 2020 by NPR
    It’s not a population that public health experts initially thought would need much convincing, says Anuj Mehta, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health in Denver and chair of Colorado's COVID-19 vaccine allocation committee [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]....Mehta says the fast vaccine development timeline is not, on its own, cause for concern. “The speed is not because people were cutting corners, but because of the urgency and the number of people working together on it,” he says.
    Full story
  • The effects of COVID surge-on-surge expected sooner than later

    Nov 30, 2020 by Fox 31
    “One of the things to note is that reporting was delayed because of the holidays. Because people were off, we’re probably going to see a huge bump in those numbers in the next day or two,” said UCHealth Infection Prevention Sr. Medical Director Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID-19 deaths in Colorado are shooting up. Here’s how officials track the numbers.

    Dec 1, 2020 by Denver Post
    “It is always a bit politically charged because different people have different motivations,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado. “But it has played out in spades with the COVID pandemic because there is such a lot of political motivation to say, ‘Oh, it’s not that many people. It’s not so dangerous.’”
    Full story
  • Wendy Kohrt named University of Colorado Distinguished Professor

    Nov 24, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine is pleased to announce that Wendy M. Kohrt, PhD, has been named a University of Colorado Distinguished Professor by the CU Board of Regents on November 12, 2020. This is the highest recognition that can be bestowed on a University of Colorado faculty member and is a well-deserving honor for Dr. Kohrt.
    Full story
  • Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes plus pembrolizumab active in metastatic HNSCC

    Nov 19, 2020 by Healio
    Most patients experienced tumor shrinkage that in some cases met the criteria for objective response, according to study co-author Antonio Jimeno, professor of medicine/oncology and otolaryngology at University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Self-Care Intervention May Only Temporize HF Patients Discharged From ED

    Nov 19, 2020 by Medpage Today
    Long-term care is ideally personalized to each patient, according to Larry Allen, and Colleen McIlvennan, both of University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, writing in an accompanying editorial.
    Full story
  • TAVR Surpasses SAVR in US, Outcomes Continue to Improve

    Nov 18, 2020 by Medscape
    “This is a trend we’ve seen coming for about 5 years, but it’s still a little mind-boggling to see how quickly the numbers are diverging,” said first author John D. Carroll, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Q&A: The mental health toll for health care workers in the pandemic

    Nov 11, 2020 by 9News
    About a month into the pandemic, Michelle Barron, professor at the CU School of Medicine specializing in infectious diseases, took the advice she had been giving others for years and sought the help of a therapist. She shared her reasoning in an episode of the CU Anschutz podcast “COVID Reflections” which focuses on the evolution of the coronavirus pandemic.
    Full story
  • Colorado Ski Resorts Were Poised To Open For Winter. A Record Spike in Coronavirus Cases Is Testing Their Plans

    Nov 13, 2020 by CPR News
    Outdoor activities like skiing — where people have plenty of room to spread out — are relatively safe, said Michelle Barron, who specializes in infectious disease at the University of Colorado hospital.... “It’s apres skiing, it’s maybe some hot tubbing and condo life and that concerns me because I think that those are the instances in which spread, obviously, could occur,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • Is It Safe To Host Friendsgiving in 2020? Experts Explain Why It Might Be Too Risky

    Nov 12, 2020 by Elite Daily
    With colder weather rolling in, there are fewer options for lower risk outdoor gatherings. Michelle Barron, Senior medical director for infection prevention and control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells Elite Daily if you aren’t part of an individual’s bubble, attending Friendsgiving can put you at high risk for contracting or transmitting COVID-19.
    Full story
  • How to Travel Safely During the Holiday Season

    Nov 16, 2020 by Conde Nast Traveler
    “Unfortunately, we have seen the numbers increasing nationwide, so it becomes even more important to assess the risks for your family,” says Andrés Henao, an internal medicine physician, infectious disease specialist, and assistant professor for the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Critical care nurses: COVID-19’s first surge has prepared us for this current one

    Nov 19, 2020 by Channel 7
    “It has been very busy [in the ICU] and it has really, as you mentioned, gone up in the last two weeks,” said Julia Limes of UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine]. . . .“We have started deploying people from other parts in the hospital to come and help us on both the COVID floors and in the COVID ICU,” said Limes.
    Full story
  • On the frontlines of COVID-19 for 8 months: ‘It’s physically and mentally exhausting’

    Nov 15, 2020 by 9News
    Fresh off the frontlines, Marc Moss [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] took the podium from Governor Jared Polis during a COVID-19 press conference on March 30...“We’re only at the beginning of this crisis,” Moss said during the press conference. Nearly eight months later, the doctor’s perspective remains unchanged. “We’re on the first lap,” Moss told 9NEWS on Sunday. “I still think we’re near the beginning of this pandemic.”
    Full story
  • COVID Cases: 64 GEO Group Employees in Aurora Test Postitive

    Nov 17, 2020 by Westword
    “I think that this [GEO staff] outbreak is the result of two factors,” says Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious-disease doctor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus who has testified in lawsuits filed against GEO Group and ICE. “A, the third wave of COVID-19 community-based transmission; and B, the lack of preparedness needed to protect detainees during this pandemic. The latter factor is important to emphasize because it reveals the inability of detainees to shield from the pandemic. They just don’t care about detainees.”
    Full story
  • Pfizer to request coronavirus vaccine emergency use authorization ‘within days’

    Nov 18, 2020 by Fox News
    Each shot is comprised of the same formulation, meaning there is no difference between the shots, but the reason there has to be two is because the body responds to each differently. The first dose, Anuj Mehta, a pulmonary and critical care physician at National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], previously explained to Fox News, acts as a primer for the body’s immune system, and the second dose, given three weeks later, will kick it into gear, so to speak.
    Full story
  • Hundreds of people from Colorado are participating in the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial

    Nov 16, 2020 by Fox 31
    Thomas Campbell agrees. He’s the Chief Clinical Research Officer at UCHealth who is overseeing the trial. Campbell says this vaccine is similar to the Pfizer vaccine, and has similar early data. “When you do two experiments, two scientific experiments and get the same answer you have much greater confidence in the results,” Campbell said.
    Full story
  • ‘It’s Exciting’: Denver Moderna COVID Vaccine Trial Participant Talks About Effective Rate

    Nov 17, 2020 by CBS4
    “We have two independent scientific experiments that come up with the same results that demonstrate that both of these vaccines are highly effective,” said Thomas Campbell, a professor of infectious disease medicine at CU Anschutz Medical Campus. “We are able to do that already with lots of other vaccines, I don’t think that will be a big issue.”
    Full story
  • Two vaccine trials show promising results, but there’s still a long way to go

    Nov 16, 2020 by Channel 7
    “That, I think, is very reassuring that you have two independent experiments that have come to the same conclusion, that the conclusion is real,” said Thomas Campbell, the chief clinical research officer for UCHealth and the associate dean for clinical research at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • A look at the strain on some Colorado hospitals caused by the current wave of COVID-19

    Nov 12, 2020 by 9News
    The Colorado Hospital Association (CHA) said that across the state, there is still hospital capacity. “Now compared to what happened in the spring, we are seeing more patients who have COVID hospitalized staying in the medical floor. They are sick. Sick enough to be in the hospital but not so sick they are needing intensive care,” Darlene Tad-y [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] told Next.
    Full story
  • Colorado hospitals team up to cope with COVID-19 surge, CDPHE issues plea to step up mitigation tactics

    Nov 16, 2020 by Channel 7
    “We’re increasing the number of beds needed for COVID patients on a day to day basis,” said Jean Kutner, the chief medical officer at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We’ve expanded now into our third Intensive Care Unit.”
    Full story
  • Health care workers cope with stress, burnout

    Nov 4, 2020 by Colorado Springs Indy
    “Everybody across the board — nonclinical staff, EMTs, nurses, physicians — has a pretty high degree of concern around exposing themselves or their families to COVID,” says Elizabeth Harry, senior director of clinical affairs at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and visiting associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Your Healthy Family: UCHealth launches 2nd COVID-19 vaccine trial and is looking for participants

    Nov 2, 2020 by KOAA
    Thomas Campbell, chief clinical research officer of UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said this is one of about 40 COVID-19 clinical trials in which UCHealth locations are participating. In July, UCHealth announced [uchealth.org] it was partnering with CU School of Medicine to recruit participants for another vaccine trial at University of Colorado Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Colorado’s Coronavirus Third Wave Is Here, And Hospitalization Will Soon Surpass April’s Peak

    Nov 5, 2020 by CPR News
    “One of the best practices we learned from other states that have already responded to significant outbreaks was to stand up a statewide transfer center,” said Darlene Tad-y, CHA vice president of clinical affairs [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “This will allow us to respond rapidly to capacity issues that a city or region of Colorado may face.”
    Full story
  • High Sugar Intake May Worsen Depression, ADHD And Bipolar Disorder; Study Claims

    Oct 23, 2020 by NDTV Food
    “Recent studies have shown that the reason fructose intake is strongly associated with development of metabolic syndrome is that fructose intake activates an evolutionary-based survival pathway that stimulates foraging behavior and the storage of energy as fat,” said lead author Richard Johnson, professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • ‘COVID fear’ is keeping Coloradans away from important health checkups

    Oct 27, 2020 by Fox 31
    “She is the poster child for what she’s been doing,” said Radhika Acharya-Leon, a medical oncologist at UCHealth [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Acharya-Leon is McCumber’s doctor. She said McCumber should serve as an example for others who find themselves timid to return for exams, check-ups or even appointments.
    Full story
  • There’s an Ongoing COVID Outbreak at the Aurora ICE Facility

    Oct 26, 2020 by Westword
    “There’s an ongoing outbreak at the facility,” Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious-disease doctor associated with the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said during an October 26 virtual press conference advocating for the release of detainees, particularly medically vulnerable detainees, from the facility. “There’s not really any other way to protect them.”
    Full story
  • UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital opening clinical trial aimed at COVID prevention

    Oct 27, 2020 by Fox 31
    “Right now, we don’t have anything that we can offer people who are exposed and at risk for getting sick,” Brian Montague, an infectious disease specialist said.
    Full story
  • Preventing COVID-19: UCHealth Asking People Exposed To Virus To Try Regeneron Antibody Treatment

    Oct 26, 2020 by CBS4
    “It’s only available through clinical trials so we have a chance to really evaluate if it works,” said Brian Montague, an infectious disease physician [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], who is leading one of those clinical trials.
    Full story
  • Despite similar hospitalization rates, Colorado COVID-19 deaths are about 1/3 of what they were in May

    Oct 28, 2020 by 9News
    “In the span of about seven months, the whole world has come together to communicate and share ideas and perform clinical research and we’ve identified ways to improve outcome from patients in a very short period of time in terms of medical research,” explained Marc Moss, the critical care director at University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “It’s unprecedented what’s happened. We still have a lot of work to do though.”
    Full story
  • Popular scrubs company FIGS generates backlash from women in medicine and Dos after insensitive video

    Oct 16, 2020 by CNN
    Sunnie Kim, gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, called it a "great response" on Twitter, adding “hope we can all get to a better place with gender equality and continue to debunk outdated stereotypes.”
    Full story
  • ‘Low-cost, clinic-based intervention’ curtails hospital readmission rates in lupus

    Oct 19, 2020 by Healio
    “Systemic lupus erythematosus often requires inpatient hospitalization,” Elena Weinstein, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told Healio Rheumatology. “About 20% to 25% of individuals with SLE are hospitalized each year.”
    Full story
  • Is there a need for a new cardiometabolic medicine subspecialty?

    Oct 16, 2020 by Healio
    “A post-internal medicine resident training program in cardiometabolic medicine would encompass metabolic elements of endocrinology — no emphasis on thyroid disease, bone disease, reproductive medicine or pituitary and adrenal disease — and focus instead on obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and lifestyle medicine,” writes Robert H. Eckel, emeritus professor of medicine in the divisions of cardiology and endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, [at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Sugar, high-fructose corn syrup linked to ADHD, bipolar, aggressive behavior

    Oct 16, 2020 by UPI
    “There have been many reports suggesting that sugar or other added sweeteners such as high-fructose corn syrup may be able to cause or aggravate various behavioral disorders,” study co-author Richard Johnson told UPI. “The evidence is based on the unique ability of fructose to lower energy that triggers a foraging type of response,” said Johnson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Did COVID-19 Cancel Thanksgiving? What to Know About Holiday Travel During the Pandemic

    Oct 18, 2020 by Healthline
    If you’re traveling, consider staying at a hotel rather than with relatives, unless everyone in the group is very low risk and has plenty of space to spread out, said Andrés Henao, internal medicine physician, infectious disease specialist, and director of the UCHealth Travel Clinic at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Vote in Person: Is It Safe to Vote in Person in 2020?

    Oct 21, 2020 by Yahoo! News
    Gwen A. Huitt, an infectious disease physician at National Jewish Health [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says that since early in the pandemic, “we’ve known that some simple measures can drastically reduce the rate of infection with the novel coronavirus.”
    Full story
  • Massive WHO remdesivir study suggests no Covid-19 benefit. Doctors aren’t so sure.

    Oct 16, 2020 by NBC
    A huge, global study of potential medications to treat Covid-19 suggests remdesivir — one of the few available drugs for the virus — may offer no real benefit to the sickest patients. But doctors on the front lines of treating severe cases advise caution when interpreting the findings. "We already knew that in sicker populations, it didn't really change outcomes," said Ken Lyn-Kew, a pulmonologist in the critical care section at National Jewish Health.
    Full story
  • When A Coronavirus Vaccine Is Available, Colorado Plans To Distribute In 3 Phases

    Oct 16, 2020 by CBS4
    “I think it has gone really well, there’s been tremendous support for this vaccine trial both by the community as well as our institutions, UCHealth and the CU Anschutz Medical Campus,” said Thomas Campbell, UCHealth Chief Clinical Research Officer and a professor of infectious disease at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “Because of the broad support we’ve received, we’ve been able to enroll not only a large number but diversity in our participants to try to represent the communities that COVID-19 affects in Colorado.”
    Full story
  • COVID cases surge, is it ok to celebrate Thanksgiving?

    Oct 19, 2020 by Fox 31
    Michelle Barron, an infectious disease doctor at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] says, “I wouldn’t say you can’t do it. I just think you have to be very thoughtful. The biggest thing, if you feel sick at all, do not show up!”
    Full story
  • Colorado COVID Survivor Has A Reminder To ‘Be Careful’ As Hospitalizations Rise Rapidly

    Oct 21, 2020 by CBS4
    UCHealth Medical Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Barron says hospital treatment has evolved since the start of the pandemic. “We know how to manage these patients. We did some things early on that we just wouldn’t have thought of doing, like making people lie on their bellies, even if they weren’t necessarily requiring oxygen yet, intubating them sooner, using some of the medications we have access to, didn’t exist at that time,” said Barron.
    Full story
  • COVID-19 vaccine development (so far) unfazed by virus mutations

    Oct 19, 2020 by 9News
    “The best information we have is with influenza and clearly we know we have to get a shot every year because of that and we would assume that coronavirus probably also have some level of copying errors,” said Michelle Barron, medical director of Infection Prevention and Control at University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • Doctors: Testing is key to tracking COVID-19, but how and when makes a big difference

    Oct 18, 2020 by Fox 31
    “The reality is Jan. 1, 2021, it’s not over,” Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention for UC Health University of Colorado Hospital said. Barron says after a person is exposed to someone with COVID-19, testing too soon can be misleading. “Once you’re exposed, its not wham-bam and you’re sick in the moment,” Barron said. “It usually takes three to five days for the infection to manifest.”
    Full story
  • Colorado hospitals are better prepared for COVID-19 than in March, but flu creates uncertainty

    Oct 18, 2020 by Denver Post
    An average of 78% of intensive-care hospital beds and 79% of acute-care beds across Colorado were in use over the seven days ending Thursday. That doesn’t put hospitals at the breaking point, but they are monitoring that to decide about opening additional beds or canceling procedures that aren’t urgent, said Darlene Tad-y, vice president for clinical affairs at the Colorado Hospital Association [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “It’s a signal for us to pay attention,” she said.​ Typically, hospitals can get an idea of what the flu season will be like by looking to Australia, whose winter flu season is during the Northern Hemisphere’s summer, said Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Radiology is the most mentally demanding physician specialty with heavy workload likely contributing to burnout

    Oct 12, 2020 by Radiology Business
    “Even a modest decrease in PTL (physician task load) was associated with a decrease in burnout, suggesting standard process improvement has the potential to positively impact PTL when looked at using this lens,” Elizabeth Harry, senior director of clinical affairs at the University of Colorado Hospital [and visiting associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], and co-authors concluded.
    Full story
  • Colorado, City of Denver unveil guidance for safe trick-or-treating this Halloween

    Oct 12, 2020 by Channel 7
    UCHealth’s director of infection prevention Michelle Barron says just like checking the weather on Halloween, we should be checking local COVID numbers, too. “If you’re in a community where there’s high rates of COVID, then going out and about is probably not a good idea,” Barron said. “But, doing things outdoors is obviously going to be much safer than if you have lots of people crowded in a small area without a lot of ventilation.”
    Full story
  • COVID patients with lingering problems seek help at ‘Post COVID Clinic’

    Oct 14, 2020 by Fox 31
    Sarah Jolley [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] is a pulmonary critical care doctor at the outpatient clinic. “It does seem like if we can get people therapy early on, that can help to preserve some of their function,” Jolley said.
    Full story
  • Summit Biolabs, CCPM to Develop Liquid Biopsy Tests for COVID-19, Head and Neck Cancer

    Oct 14, 2020 by 360Dx
    “Collaborations like this are crucial in moving research forward and advancing and expanding clinical testing to as many members of our community as possible,” Kathleen Barnes, professor and director of CCPM at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said in a statement.
    Full story
  • State committee releases preliminary plan for distributing COVID-19 vaccine

    Oct 9, 2020 by 9News
    Gov. Jared Polis’ (D-Colorado) medical advisory group has released a preliminary plan for distributing the COVID-19 vaccine in Colorado, when it becomes available. “It’s really a values proposition, so everybody is equal,” said Anuj Mehta with National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Clinical Trials Underway In Colorado For COVID Antibody Treatment The President Received

    Oct 9, 2020 by CBS4
    “The president received the same combination of two monoclonal antibodies that are being used in the clinical trials. The president did not enroll in a clinical trial, the president received these antibodies through what’s called ‘compassionate use,’” said infectious disease expert Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Can You Get The ‘Antibody Cocktail’ The President Got For COVID?

    Oct 8, 2020 by Newsy
    “Shortening the course of illness, getting people feeling better, faster, getting people discharged from the hospital faster,” said Thomas Campbell, Associate Dean for Adult Health Research at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • UCHealth celebrates release of 2,000th COVID patient

    Oct 6, 2020 by Fox 31
    “We’ve seen tremendous changes in how we have cared for patients with COVID infection over the past six months. It’s amazing to think this is a brand-new disease none of us have ever seen. We’ve learned from our own experiences. We have participated in 38 clinical trials of various ways of treating COVID-19 and learning from various colleagues across the country. We are definitely seeing better outcomes month over month,” said Jean Kutner is the chief medical officer for University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Hospice: Palliative Care In A Limbo Because Of COVID-19

    Oct 5, 2020 by Health Writeups
    Jean Abbott is a retired emergency medicine physician. She also teaches at the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. According to her and her colleagues, hospitals and Palliative Care Centers must plan ahead and always be ready for any pandemic or emergency.
    Full story
  • No Hugs: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Impacted Palliative, Hospice Care

    Oct 1, 2020 by Healthline
    Jean Abbott, a retired emergency medicine physician who teaches at the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told Healthline she was led to strong language in her study out of angst. She also wanted to push the concept of doing this better, even in possible near-future pandemic lockdowns.
    Full story
  • Colorado’s makeshift COVID-19 hospital still sits empty, to the tune of $60,000 a day

    Oct 1, 2020 by Channel 7
    At UCHealth, director of infection prevention Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] explains this winter could be unpredictable. “There is the risk that we have a number of flu hospitalizations and then COVID-19 surges and then our hospital capacity will be diminished,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • ‘We are wondering if there’s something different,’ doctors talk about lasting effects of COVID-19

    Oct 4, 2020 by Fox 31
    Todd Bull, a pulmonologist with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said Sunday he sees patients have symptoms, such as shortness of breath, fatigue, joint issues, or unclear thoughts for an extended period of time.
    Full story
  • Coloradans discuss participation in Regeneron’s antibody cocktail therapy

    Oct 7, 2020 by Fox 31
    “So far the antibodies appear to be very well tolerated without any serious side effects,” said Thomas Campbell of UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine]. “These monoclonal antibodies may provide benefits to people with COVID-19 illness by helping them get better faster.”
    Full story
  • Regeneron antibody cocktail used in clinical trials to fight COVID-19 at UCHealth

    Oct 5, 2020 by 9News
    “They found evidence that there was some potential benefit for people with COVID-19 illness, particularly for those people who had not yet developed their own natural antibody response,” said Thomas Campbell, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] an infectious-disease specialist who oversees the trial at UCHealth.
    Full story
  • Trump’s Covid-19 Treatment Seeks to Boost Immune Response

    Oct 5, 2020 by Wall Street Journal
    But their immune systems are another important factor, researchers say. “When you challenge a body with a virus or a vaccine, there’s just not the vigorous response,” said Cari Levy, a geriatrician who is a professor at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • In a First, New England Journal of Medicine Joins Never-Trumpers

    Oct 7, 2020 by The New York Times
    “Wow,” said Matthew K. Wynia, an infectious disease specialist and director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado. He noted that the editorial did not explicitly mention Mr. Biden, but said it was clearly “an obvious call to replace the president.”
    Full story
  • Confusion about Trump’s COVID-19 infection fits a long pattern of skimpy details about presidential health

    Oct 3, 2020 by Boston Globe
    After hearing Conley’s press conference on Saturday, Matthew Wynia, director of the Center of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said he worried the public was hearing “contradictory statements” that make “things even more uncertain than they need to be.”
    Full story
  • Too much candy: Man dies from eating bags of black licorice

    Sep 25, 2020 by St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    “It’s more than licorice sticks. It could be jelly beans, licorice teas, a lot of things over the counter. Even some beers, like Belgian beers, have this compound in it,” as do some chewing tobaccos, said Robert Eckel, a University of Colorado cardiologist and former American Heart Association president. He had no role in the Massachusetts man's care.
    Full story
  • Health care providers term flu vaccine “more important than ever” amid COVID-19 pandemic

    Sep 30, 2020 by Colorado Springs Indy
    “We are very worried you could get COVID and flu at the same time,” says Michelle Barron, medical director for Infection Control and Prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus, and professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • VERIFY: Are health care workers required to get flu shots?

    Sep 23, 2020 by 9News
    “Everybody that works in the UCHealth system, regardless of your role, has to get a flu shot every year,” said Michelle Barron, medical director of Infection Prevention and Control at UCHealth University Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We’ve been very successful in terms of getting that done every year and our rates of compliance are 99% or 100% every year.”
    Full story
  • Study finds asthma may not raise risk of severe COVID-19

    Sep 30, 2020 by Fox5 Atlanta
    That may not be the case, says Fernando Holguin, director of Asthma Clinical and Research Programs at the CU School of Medicine and pulmonologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. Holguin led a study that looked at research data from 15 other studies of COVID-19 infections in people with asthma. His team found the airway disease may not be as high-risk as first thought. “Asthma is not likely something that raises the risk of having severe pneumonia from COVID,” Holguin says.
    Full story
  • From the COVID-19 front line: Experts discuss case control, testing, vaccine and more

    Sep 30, 2020 by Healio
    “Obviously, we would love to see fewer cases. There’s no doubt about that. And, if we can flatten the curve even further, that’s certainly ideal,” William Janssen, section head of critical care medicine and professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at National Jewish Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said during the virtual discussion Aug. 27.
    Full story
  • Post-Covid clinics get jump-start from patients with lingering illness

    Sep 24, 2020 by CNN
    “We need to think about how we’re going to provide care for patients who may be recovering for years after the virus,” said Sarah Jolley, a pulmonologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and director of UCHealth's Post-Covid Clinic [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID-19 reported reinfecting some people in Colorado

    Sep 24, 2020 by Fox 31
    “That’s not really a surprise to us,” said Michelle Barron, an infectious disease expert at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “If you think about most of the respiratory viruses, how many colds have you had in your lifetime? A lot. And often it can be the same virus that infects you.”
    Full story
  • Ticagrelor plus aspirin reduces ischemic limb events in diabetes, stable CAD: THEMIS

    Sep 18, 2020 by Healio
    Marc P. Bonaca, associate professor and director of vascular research at University of Colorado School of Medicine and executive director of clinical research and community health at CPC Clinical Research, presented the new analysis at the virtual European Society of Cardiology Congress.
    Full story
  • Overactivation of fructose made in the brain may drive Alzheimer’s disease

    Sep 23, 2020 by News Medical
    “In essence, we propose that Alzheimer’s disease is a modern disease driven by changes in dietary lifestyle in which fructose can disrupt cerebral metabolism and neuronal function,” said Richard Johnson, Professor, University of Colorado School of Medicine, CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • University of Colorado School of Medicine and AristaMD Partner to Expand eConsults to Community Providers

    Sep 22, 2020 by Valdosta (Ga.) Daily Times
    “After conducting an extensive competitive evaluation, we selected AristaMD for their best-in-class technology, service and ability to launch the eConsult platform directly through the Epic EHR, creating a user-friendly experience for answering eConsults with minimal provider burden and workflow changes,” said Anne Fuhlbrigge, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Too much candy: Man dies from eating bags of black licorice

    Sep 23, 2020 by KSAT (San Antonio)
    “It’s more than licorice sticks. It could be jelly beans, licorice teas, a lot of things over the counter. Even some beers, like Belgian beers, have this compound in it,” as do some chewing tobaccos, said Robert Eckel, a University of Colorado cardiologist and former American Heart Association president. He had no role in the Massachusetts man’s care.
    Full story
  • Colorado Doctors Studying COVID-19 Survivors With Post-Illness Symptoms

    Sep 20, 2020 by CBS4
    Sarah Jolley, a pulmonologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says Elizabeth isn’t alone. “We have certainly had patients who have had prolonged symptoms after COVID.”
    Full story
  • How do vaccines get approved for mass distribution? Doctors explain

    Sep 22, 2020 by Today
    At UCHealth in Colorado, volunteers are rolling up their sleeves for a shot at protection from coronavirus. Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] is chief investigator, leading Phase 3 trials of Moderna’s experimental vaccine.
    Full story
  • Taiwan’s 2020 Tang Prize Biopharmaceutical Science Laureates to Decipher the Code of Body’s Inflammatory Responses

    Sep 14, 2020 by Taiwan News
    As COVID-19’s global rampage continues, countries around the world are in a race to develop not only effective vaccines but also promising therapies. The 2020 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science is jointly awarded to Charles Dinarello, university professor of the University of Colorado, [and two others] for their groundbreaking discoveries about three cytokines critically involved in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases--interleukin-1(IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-6 (IL-6).
    Full story
  • Denver Arts & Venues pivots to virtual exhibits

    Sep 15, 2020 by Channel 7
    Rowan completed a portrait of Abigail Lara. Lara said it was overwhelming seeing herself how patients see her at their bedside. “Wow. This is raw. This is real. It was exactly what I am doing in that moment. I have my respirator on, my PPE on, and I am taking care of patients,” Lara, a pulmonary physician at the University of Colorado, said.
    Full story
  • Pandemic Sparks Push for Safer Office Buildings

    Sep 14, 2020 by Colorado Real Estate Journal
    Eric Poeschla, head of infectious diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, believes architects, developers and builders should focus on increasing open areas, improved ventilation, increased humidity and hands-free devices and fixtures.
    Full story
  • How will COVID-19 affect trick-or-treating in Colorado?

    Sep 10, 2020 by Fox 31
    “The costume masks are probably not sufficient. So you really have to have a mask underneath their costume,” said Michelle Barron, the medical director and infection prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • ACLU pressures Polis to release more inmates at risk for COVID-19

    Sep 9, 2020 by Colorado Springs Independent
    Inmates are at higher risk than the general population for catching and dying from COVID-19, according to Carlos Franco-Paredes, an associate professor of medicine and infectious disease at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Asthma May Not Boost Odds of Severe COVID-19

    Sep 4, 2020 by U.S. News & World Report
    “A lot of people with asthma think they have a predisposition to severe COVID, and they worry a lot about going out. They should take precautions like using their masks, but they may not need to worry so much,” said study author Fernando Holguin. He’s director of the Asthma Clinical and Research Program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Cardiologist expects a busy week with Colorado’s dramatic drop in temperature

    Sep 8, 2020 by 9News
    The dramatic temperature drop Colorado experienced Tuesday could keep cardiologists on their toes. “We’re expecting a busy week,” said Prateeti Khazanie, a cardiologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “The temperature went from about 101 degrees on Saturday over Labor Day weekend to 35 degrees today. So, we are looking out for our patients.”
    Full story
  • Researchers: Colon cancer rates are rising in young adults

    Sep 7, 2020 by Channel 7
    “This highlights that people under the age of 45 are being missed and people are still dying of that cancer under the age of 45,” said Denver Health Gastroenterologist Alvaro Martinez-Camacho [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Front Range air quality worsens, making breathing difficult

    Sep 7, 2020 by Fox 31
    “The particulate matter is an irritant and increases mucus production in the lungs and causes increased inflammation in the airways … so this is a really potent trigger for many people, unfortunately, to worsen their breathing,” Jeffrey Sippel said, a pulmonologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of clinical practice of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Colorado Could Soon Have 5 Different Color-Coded Levels Of COVID-19 Protection

    Sep 3, 2020 by CBS4
    “I think it’s actually a really clever way of doing this in a way that makes sense,” said Michelle Barron, infectious disease specialist at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Communities of Color, Hit Hard by Coronavirus, Step In To Fill The Gaps In The Government’s Response

    Sep 10, 2020 by CPR News
    In April, Abbey Lara [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] worked her first shift treating pulmonary and critical care patients in the COVID-19 section of the ICU ward at University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora. She counted 16 patients: two African American patients, one Filipino patient and 13 Latino patients. “It was incredibly striking,” said Lara, the daughter of migrants from Mexico.
    Full story
  • Fast & Accurate: Homegrown COVID-19 Antibody Test

    Sep 9, 2020 by KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, Texas)
    “When it comes to our immune system’s ability to fight things long-term, the antibodies are key,” stated Ashley Frazer-Abel, assistant professor from University of Colorado School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • No, Halloween Isn’t Canceled This Year – Here’s How to Celebrate Safely

    Sep 1, 2020 by Real Simple
    “Just like we check the weather on Halloween to see what precautions and extra gear might be needed, knowing the current state of COVID-19 in your community will be important in determining if it is safe or not,” says Michelle Barron, medical director for infection prevention and control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Chagas disease: Risk of developing cardiac disease doubles for asymptomatic infections

    Aug 31, 2020 by Outbreak News Today
    “It’s important to study infections like Chagas disease and its tie to fatal or disabling cardiac disease because it can help inform public health programs that can save people’s lives,” said lead author Andrés Henao-Martínez, assistant professor of infectious diseases at the CU School of Medicine.
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  • Fast-Tracking A COVID-19 Vaccine Could Be A Double-Edged Sword

    Sep 3, 2020 by Wyoming Public Radio
    “There have been recent examples of that,” said Thomas Campbell, a virologist and infectious disease specialist with the University of Colorado School of Medicine and UCHealth. “For instance, with remdesivir, there was a phase 3 trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the DSMB monitoring that study found evidence that remdesivir was providing benefit for treatment of severe and critical COVID."
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  • Months before its arrival, Colorado tries to answer the question: Who should get the coronavirus vaccine first?

    Aug 31, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “It is super-complex to think about how to do this,” said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonologist and critical care specialist at National Jewish Health and Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who is helping to lead some of the discussions.​ “You can’t even plan for all these things in advance because your allocation protocol might change based on all the circumstances,” said Matthew Wynia, a bioethicist who leads the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
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  • Healthy People 2030: HHS Prioritizes Socioeconomic Disparities, Overall Well-Being

    Aug 20, 2020 by Medpage Today
    Whereas much of Healthy People 2020’s focus was on individual health behaviors, the new set of targets pays more attention to overall well-being, a “very important area” that is related in part to the consequences of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, commented Robert Eckel, of the University of Colorado in Aurora.
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  • Dr. Schenk on the Evolving Treatment Landscape in Lung Cancer

    Aug 25, 2020 by OncLive
    Erin Schenk, assistant professor of medicine and medical oncology, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses the rapidly evolving treatment landscape in lung cancer.
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  • VA Out-of-System Access to PCI Linked to Higher Mortality

    Aug 24, 2020 by Medscape
    “Whether it’s within the VA or outside the VA, the assessment of interventional quality is paramount to ensure that patients receive the best possible care, veterans or nonveterans,” said Stephen Waldo, who is affiliated with both the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center.
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  • An ‘Unprecedented’ Effort to Stop the Coronavirus in Nursing Homes

    Aug 20, 2020 by The New York Times
    “These patients are so underserved,” said Rebecca Boxer, medical director of clinical trials at the Kaiser Permanente’s Institute for Health Research in Colorado [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “They do not get access to innovative new drugs and trials.”​ “There just isn’t a culture in nursing homes that is attuned to doing research and clinical trials,” said Mathew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • UCHealth to enroll 100 people per week in Moderna’s Phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial

    Aug 25, 2020 by Fox 31
    “All the data, so far, for this particular vaccine — from the earlier stage trials — looks very promising,” said UCHealth infectious disease expert Thomas Campbell.
    Full story
  • Colorado, Black Retiree Among First To Participate In COVID-19 Vaccine Trial

    Aug 25, 2020 by CBS4
    “If it’s effective and safe, then it could be a game changer,” said Thomas Campbell, infectious disease physician and principal investigator for the study at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. He understands minorities’ reluctance to participate. “There have been abuses in the past,” Campbell said, “what we would consider to be unethical experimentation.”
    Full story
  • UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital again named No. 1 hospital in the state

    Jul 27, 2020 by UCHealth Today
    For the ninth year in a row, U.S. News and World Report ranks UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital (UCH), located on the Anschutz Medical Campus, No. 1 on its list of the state’s best hospitals. UCH is also ranked among the nation’s best in nine specialties including No. 2 in pulmonology & lung surgery.
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  • Dr. Bunn on Targeting HER3 in NSCLC

    Aug 18, 2020 by OncLive
    Paul A. Bunn, Jr, distinguished professor, James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, and a 2014 Giant of Cancer Care® in Lung Cancer, discusses potentially targeting HER3 in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
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  • ‘Metabolic syndrome’ label imprecise, but cardiometabolic risk is real

    Aug 17, 2020 by Healio
    The definition of metabolic syndrome has been argued upon for decades, and debate continues with the definition of cardiometabolic syndrome, according to Robert H. Eckel, emeritus professor of medicine in the divisions of cardiology and endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, emeritus professor of physiology and biophysics and Charles A. Boettcher II Chair in Atherosclerosis at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, past president of the American Heart Association and current president of medicine and science of the American Diabetes Association.
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  • Lung defense in the face of wildfires and a pandemic

    Aug 17, 2020 by Steamboat Pilot & Today
    In terms of smoke coming from the wildfires surrounding Steamboat Springs, the people who most need to take extra caution are those with existing respiratory issues, said Sarah Jolley, an assistant professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. For people with conditions including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, or any other form of lung disease, wildfire smoke could “increase the risk of exacerbation and infection,” Jolley said.
    Full story
  • Colorado Fires Damage Air Quality, May Threaten Recovery of COVID-19 Survivors

    Aug 14, 2020 by International Business Times
    Mark Kearns, a pulmonary critical care physician at Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]: “We know that many of our patients that have recovered from COVID, even people that have been severe enough to require care in the hospital or ICU like months later still having symptoms. Whether that be ongoing shortness of breath, fatigue — [they] just haven’t been able to return back to their normal state of health.”​ Despite the warning, Sarah Jolley, director of the Post-COVID Clinic at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], revealed there isn’t a definitive link between those who are recovering from the coronavirus and poor air quality.
    Full story
  • Your Healthy Family: UCHealth COVID project follows patients after discharge

    Aug 14, 2020 by KOAA
    “These are our future doctors and medical leaders of tomorrow. And the more experience we can give them in the pandemic today, the better equipped they will be to handle future pandemics,” said Renna Becerra, inpatient internal medicine liaison for the CU School of Medicine Colorado Springs Branch and co-investigator of the project.
    Full story
  • Denver doctors may have found the answer to a pandemic mystery: What happened to all the heart attacks?

    Aug 17, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    When the new coronavirus first swept through Colorado earlier this year, baffling doctors with its myriad of symptoms and methods of spread, Brian Stauffer, the head of cardiology at Denver Health, soon began to notice a different kind of pandemic mystery. People, it seemed, had stopped having heart attacks.... A new study from Stauffer and several Denver Health colleagues offers the first clue to the answer in Colorado.
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  • COVID-19 vaccine trials need diverse volunteers to ensure safety, effectiveness and public buy-in

    Aug 20, 2020 by USA Today
    At the University of Colorado, Thomas Campbell [professor of medicine] said his medical practice has used its electronic medical records to identify and reach out to everyone at high risk for COVID-19. “I’ve already had over 100 people email me personally and said ‘sign me up,’” said Campbell, also an infectious disease physician at UCHealth.
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  • Q&A: Work still needed before COVID-19 vaccine trial can begin in Colorado

    Aug 15, 2020 by 9News
    Thomas Campbell, an infectious disease physician at the CU School of Medicine, told 9NEWS they have started outreach but not recruitment. “We have received a lot of interest; we already have close to 100 people who have stepped forward and said, ‘I want to volunteer for this study,’” Campbell said.
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  • Rheumatoid arthritis clinical trial sifts blood for disease risk

    Aug 4, 2020 by UCHealth Today
    The StopRA trial has screened more than 20,000 people, looking for antibody that greatly increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that attacks the joints
    Full story
  • The Safe and Unsafe Ways People Are Worshipping During COVID-19

    Aug 4, 2020 by Healthline
    It’s behavior that worries Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. “I think unfortunately the whole mask thing and many of these things have become so politicized there’s certainly so much information out there that’s just terrible and it’s left a lot of people on the fence in terms of really understanding what’s at stake,” Barron told Healthline.
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  • Is It Safe to Travel to See My Family?

    Aug 3, 2020 by 5280
    In search of what I might call a more humanistic view on air travel in the time of COVID-19, I reached out to an unlikely source: an infectious disease specialist. Michelle Barron is the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Is it wise for CU Buffs, CSU Rams to pursue football as COVID-19 rages? “The glory days of college athletics may be over.”

    Aug 2, 2020 by Denver Post
    “And that’s the key to this,” said Michelle Barron, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious disease at CU’s Anschutz Medical Campus. “I think that’s important, if we can maximize all we can do (off the field), or we can’t do it. That means, if (players) don’t follow the rules, you’re off the team for the rest of the year. There has to be some level of consequence for people who don’t follow the rules.”
    Full story
  • Dr. Bunn on Data With Trastuzumab Deruxtecan in HER2-Mutant NSCLC

    Jul 27, 2020 by OncLive
    Paul A. Bunn, Jr, distinguished professor, James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado and a 2014 Giant of Cancer Care® in Lung Cancer, highlights encouraging data with fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki (Enhertu) in HER2-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
    Full story
  • Nationally ranking Colorado hospitals mull long-term impacts of Covid-19 on health care

    Jul 28, 2020 by Denver Business Journal
    For University of Colorado Hospital, Covid-19 has reinforced the importance of close collaboration between academic and clinical partners. “We were able to stand up very quickly a process for embedding evidence-based clinical pathways and guidelines,” Jean Kutner, chief medical officer of UCH [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told Denver Business Journal.
    Full story
  • Can a pay cut hurt your health?

    Jul 17, 2020 by News-Review (Petoskey, Mich.)
    Those consequences are distinct from the well-established connections between poverty and poor health, said Edward Havranek, director of medicine at Denver Health Medical Center [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. And although the exact reasons for the link between plunging income and later health problems aren’t clear, one obvious suspect is stress. “As our wealth drops, we have the same set of obligations,” Havranek said.
    Full story
  • Your COVID-19 antibody testing samples can be used for genetic research

    Jul 21, 2020 by Fox 31
    “I think the public is much more aware of the benefits of genetic testing in getting information back that can help them make really important decisions about their own life, their treatment, their risk of developing disease and more. I also think there’s a real altruistic nature to our patient population. They want to contribute to research and discovery, and I appreciate those who have joined this initiative.” Kathleen Barnes, Director Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine and University of Colorado School of Medicine Professor
    Full story
  • Colorado hospitals analyze change in COVID-19 hospitalization rates

    Jul 20, 2020 by Fox 31
    “The question is, is this the beginning [like] what happened back in March when it started this way and then it escalated, or this sort of a slow steady increase that we’ll see that will remain manageable,” Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention and Control at the University of Colorado Hospital UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said, adding “Or will it go back down? I think those are the things that remain definitely unknown.”
    Full story
  • Statin therapy less common in PAD than CHD, cerebrovascular disease

    Jul 13, 2020 by Healio
    In a related editorial, Marc P. Bonaca, associate professor and director of vascular research at University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Connie N. Hess, associate professor of medicine at University of Colorado School of Medicine, wrote: “Taken together, these observations confirm the risk profile of patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic vascular disease and the important association of polyvascular disease with outcomes”
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  • Surviving COVID-19

    Jul 13, 2020 by ACP Hospitalist
    ACP Member Read G. Pierce, agreed that building relationships with clinical colleagues can help one find joy and sustenance in work. In the spring, the hospitalist and associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus created an hour-long Zoom forum with his colleagues to connect and debrief. They call it “Fears, Beers, and Cheers.”
    Full story
  • Convention fight, Great White, isolation island: News from around our 50 states

    Jul 14, 2020 by USA Today
    Unlike traditional vaccines that expose participants to a small amount of virus, this vaccine focuses on the genetic code of the coronavirus and its spike protein, said Thomas Campbell, an infectious disease doctor at the CU School of Medicine and University of Colorado Hospital. The recruitment period will last about two months, and the call will go out through UCHealth’s My Health Connection patient portal.
    Full story
  • New COVID-19 Vaccine Trial In Colorado: UCHealth Recruiting 1,000 Patients

    Jul 9, 2020 by CBS4
    “The vaccine is intended to prevent COVID-19,” said Thomas Campbell, an infectious disease physician at the CU School of Medicine and University of Colorado Hospital. “So the trial will evaluate how well the vaccine does that and it will also evaluate whether or not the vaccine is safe for people to get.”
    Full story
  • DPS responds to board member concerns over in-person learning

    Jul 13, 2020 by Fox 31
    The Medical Director for Infection Prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, Michelle Barron, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said based on the information local schools have right now, they appear to be making sound choices on reopening schools.
    Full story
  • Doctor’s warning to Douglas County: Now is not the time to leave Tri-County Health

    Jul 10, 2020 by Channel 7
    David Beuther serves as a pulmonary physician and the chief medical information officer at National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. This year, he served on the Douglas County advisory board to help reopen schools in the fall. He supports the mask mandate and is afraid that if people don’t start to take masks more seriously the state could need to shut down again.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus In Colorado: Young Adults Seeing Higher Rate Of Infection

    Jul 9, 2020 by CBS4
    Marc Moss, UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital Director of Critical Care [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says right now they’re seeing a slight increase in hospital patients with COVID-19. “That’s concerning,” Moss said. “Because that little blip going from 20 to 27, then it’s 30, 40 and were back up to the 160 people we had in the hospital.”
    Full story
  • Pandemic inspires a new generation of health care workers

    Jul 10, 2020 by Channel 7
    “Growing up, I was always pretty interested in science. I have a few family members who are in medicine and nursing,” said University of Colorado fourth-year medical student Lauren Heery. “Helping people through my direct knowledge as a scientist, and now as a medical student, was I think what interested me the most.”
    Full story
  • 7 Medical Professionals Tell Us What It’s Like On Colorado’s Coronavirus Front Lines

    Jul 17, 2020 by CPR News
    CPR News continues to speak with experts, doctors, researchers and people who’ve recovered. We want to bring you the stories of people who are caring for COVID-19 patients in their own words. Why do they do what they do? What do they remember about seeing their first coronavirus patient? And...what do they hope we take away from this pandemic. Here’s what seven medical professionals had to say.
    Full story
  • Department of Medicine Announces 2020-21 PACE Scholars

    Jul 17, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The Academic Clinician Education (PACE) program supports the career development of our department’s clinician-educators. These faculty members make crucial contributions to the success of our department by developing and improving innovative educational programs, and engaging in educational research to guide how we teach and assess health professional learners.
    Full story
  • UCHealth Highlands Ranch turns one

    Jun 30, 2020 by Highlands Ranch Herald
    “If you look at our number of covid patients compared to other hospitals, our numbers have generally been lower,” said Radhika Acharya, medical director of the cancer center [at Highlands Ranch Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I think it was because we were early adopters so we could keep our patients safe.”
    Full story
  • Colorado’s Hispanics remain hardest hit by COVID-19

    Jul 6, 2020 by Colorado Springs Gazette
    Fernando Holguin, the director of the University of Colorado’s Latino Center for Research and Policy Center, focusing on Latino health disparities, said that during the peak of hospitalizations in March and April, he recalls walking through the UCHealth intensive care unit, when he realized just by looking around that the pandemic was spreading rampantly among the minority community. “It seemed like maybe 80% were brown or Black. Most were Hispanic or had Hispanic last names,” Holguin said. “The disparities were really obvious.”
    Full story
  • Michigan reports largest single-day COVID-19 case count since May

    Jul 2, 2020 by Detroit News
    “I’ve been watching that map. Utah, Nevada, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico. From the Colorado standpoint, we’re well aware of what’s going on around us and we’re very anxious,” said Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “The next couple of weeks are critical.”
    Full story
  • Pepsi Center COVID-19 testing site results could take up to 8 days

    Jul 7, 2020 by Fox 31
    “I think [people are] scared. I think they’re scared they have the disease. They don’t want to infect other people in their family and also I think people in Colorado are smart,” UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital Director of Critical Care [and CU School of Medicine Professor of Medicine] Marc Moss said.
    Full story
  • Study shows Gen Z is more concerned about their health than Boomers

    Jul 7, 2020 by New York Post
    “If you want to have the full life you are hoping for on the other side of COVID-19, then resume your doctor appointments, check your health numbers, like blood glucose, and if you have diabetes, your hemoglobin A1c, cholesterol, and blood pressure, and get a plan for preventing heart disease and stroke,” said Robert H. Eckel, American Diabetes Association president of medicine and science and an endocrinologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Covid-19 May Trigger Diabetes in Otherwise Healthy People

    Jul 7, 2020 by Elemental
    It’s still unclear whether the new-onset cases are unique to the novel coronavirus or if they’re occurring in people who might already be prone to developing diabetes when facing systemic infection or severe stress from an illness, such as a cytokine storm, says Robert Eckel, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association and professor of medicine emeritus in the division of endocrinology, metabolism & diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • 1,000 patients wanted for COVID-19 vaccine trial in Colorado

    Jul 9, 2020 by 9News
    “Our site here at University of Colorado Hospital is part of a nationwide network called the COVID Prevention Network, which is set up so that it has a cohort of sites that are available to sequentially enroll into multiple vaccine studies,” said Thomas Campbell, an infectious disease physician at the CU School of Medicine and University of Colorado Hospital. “If it works, the Moderna vaccine could be a real game-changer for the pandemic.”
    Full story
  • Novel Program Cuts Weight Retention After Gestational Diabetes

    Jun 30, 2020 by Medscape
    Jacinda Nicklas, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, presented findings of the BAB trial during the virtual American Diabetes Association (ADA) 80th Scientific Sessions.
    Full story
  • Denver Has a Drinking Problem

    Jun 30, 2020 by 5280
    But Bill Burman, director of Denver Public Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], sees just as much of a problem with the bottomless mimosas, burger-and-a-beer lunch combos, and all-day “happy hours” that restaurants and bars marketed before the COVID-19 lockdown—and will revive after it’s over.​
    Full story
  • Denver Doctor Starts A Portrait Series To Honor Black And Women of Color Physicians

    Jun 27, 2020 by CPR News
    Sarah Rowan is an infectious disease specialist at Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] by day and an artist in her free time. She also emailed some friends from local hospitals, like Shanta Zimmer, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Colorado Hospital Anschutz Medical Campus.​
    Full story
  • What crisis care standards could mean for Valley patient care

    Jun 30, 2020 by ABC15 (Phoenix)
    “People who’ve experienced military triage and having to make these decisions on the battlefield are sometimes scarred for life by this. It’s not something you ever really forget,” said Matthew Wynia, an infectious disease and public health expert from the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • An Update on COVID-19 Treatments Being Researched in Colorado

    Jun 26, 2020 by 5280
    This randomized clinical trial began on March 18 in collaboration with UCHealth and various hospitals (over 2,000 patients are enrolled nationally). While the trial began with a broad range of COVID-19 patients, it has since narrowed to only enrolling people on a ventilator. “What’s currently being enrolled is a little further along the spectrum of severity than what the ruxolitinib study is enrolling,” says Thomas Campbell, professor of medicine-infectious diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Hydroxychloroquine Update: On Monday, June 15, the FDA revoked the authorization for physicians to prescribe hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19 outside of research studies. UCHealth is currently conducting four such trials: two inpatient and two outpatient ones, though due to press coverage, including President Donald Trump’s inaccurate claims on the drug, patients are increasingly hesitant to participate. “We worry that people are forming opinions outside of the science. We want to encourage people to enroll in trials so that we actually can get the definitive answer,” says Jean Kutner, professor of medicine at [CU School of Medicine and] UCHospital.
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  • Innovative program launched by Division of Geriatric Medicine Connects Students With COVID-19’s Most Vulnerable

    Jun 30, 2020 by CU Anschutz Medical Campus
    For Kristina Slunecka, it was the woman locked down in her assisted-living facility room, unable to leave the confines of her four walls even to go outside because of COVID-19. For Desirae Martinez, it was the elderly man beginning their first call with, “I don’t have much to say,” and still chatting with his newfound friend an hour later.
    Full story
  • World Sickle Cell Day highlights disease predominantly affecting people of color

    Jun 18, 2020 by Boulder Weekly
    In Colorado, the state legislature created The Sickle Cell Research and Treatment Center in the early 1970s as part of the CU School of Medicine. With an emphasis on research and education, the purpose of the Center is to “help to assure that persons living with sickle cell disease across the lifespan have the specialty services that they need [and] to be champions in the systems where sickle cell patients receive care,” says Director Kathryn Hassell.
    Full story
  • The Difficulty Of Counting the COVID-19 Pandemic’s Full Death Toll

    Jun 22, 2020 by Time
    “You have some stakeholders who want to downplay things and make it sound like we’ve had a wonderful response, it all worked beautifully,” says Matthew Wynia, director of the University of Colorado Center for Bioethics and Humanities and a member of the study committee. “And you’ve got others who say, ‘No, no, no. Look at all the people who were harmed.’”
    Full story
  • We Still Don’t fully Understand The Label ‘Asymptomatic’

    Jun 23, 2020 by NPR
    The findings are consistent with several studies following asymptomatic patients in China, which have found that many can develop lesions in the lungs despite having no outward symptoms, says Jennifer Taylor-Cousar, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] not involved with the paper. “It probably is, at least in this disease, pretty common,” she says.
    Full story
  • COVID-19 cases rise as hospitalizations remain low in Colorado

    Jun 21, 2020 by Fox 31
    “We don’t know what’s gonna happen in the future, and I think that’s creating a little stress in people,” said Director of Critical Care at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital Marc Moss [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. Moss says during the peak, their hospital was taking care of more than 140 COVID-19 patients. That number is now less than 10.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Has Been In Colorado For More Than 100 Days. How Are We Doing?

    Jun 19, 2020 by CPR News
    Ivor Douglas, an ICU pulmonologist at Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said the number of patients in his ICU is far below its peak in April. “The volume of very gravely ill patients with COVID-19 has settled to a low plateau,” Douglas said. At the same time, he said, those patients still in the hospital have acute health problems related to the virus. ​ Michelle Barron, the Medical Director for Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Colorado hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], is feeling encouraged but remains cautious. “I think that we’re kind of at that critical crux in terms of determining ... whether we will hopefully continue to be able to see a decline,” Barron said.
    Full story
  • Is Colorado heading toward a second spike in COVID-19 cases? We asked a doctor

    Jun 22, 2020 by 9News
    Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said the uptick in cases isn’t all bad news, and that hospitalizations have held more or less steady on recent weeks.
    Full story
  • Charles Dinerello, MD Awarded 2020 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science

    Jun 22, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    University of Colorado Distinguished Professor Charles Dinarello, MD, has today been named one of the winners of the 2020 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science “for the development of cytokine-targeting biological therapies for treatment of inflammatory diseases.” Dr. Dinarello shares the prize with Dr. Marc Feldmann and with Dr. Tadamitsu Kishimoto.
    Full story
  • University of Colorado among top-20 schools for U.S. utility patents

    Jun 12, 2020 by Colorado Springs Business Journal
    Q32 Bio — US 10,233,235 “Modulating the Alternative Complement Pathway” application pertains to methods and compositions for modulating, e.g., stimulating or inhibiting, activity of the alternative complement pathway....Q32 Bio was seeded and incubated by Atlas Venture with foundational science from renowned researchers in immunology Michael Holers, and Joshua Thurman, from the CU School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • AHA News: Hormone Therapy No Cure-All For ‘Low T’ In Aging Men

    Jun 17, 2020 by U.S. News & World Report
    “I think one of the biggest concerns about testosterone therapy is whether it is really needed,” said Robert Eckel, professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • COVID Expert Denies Lobbying for Tesla in California Reopening Fight

    Jun 11, 2020 by Daily Beast
    Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz, said his eyebrows didn’t shoot up when he read the email—but “they arched a little.”
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Cases Rise Sharply in Prisons Even as They Plateau Nationwide

    Jun 16, 2020 by The New York Times
    Public health officials say that indicates the virus has been present in prison populations for far longer than had previously been understood. “If you don’t do testing, you’re flying blind,” said Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Thousands Volunteer To Be Infected With Coronavirus To Possibly Speed Up Vaccine

    Jun 13, 2020 by CBS4
    But others wonder if it’s ethical to infect people with a potentially lethal virus with no reliable treatment. And Matthew DeCamp at UCHealth says, as coronavirus transmission rates decline, a challenge trial is a harder sell. “It’s harder to justify adding on risk and exposing people to additional risk,” said DeCamp, internal medicine doctor at UCHealth and associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • What Covid-19 antibody and viral testing can and can’t tell you about your health

    Jun 13, 2020 by CNBC
    Even if you’re not exhibiting symptoms, you could be shedding pieces of the virus. If the test comes back positive, then it is assumed that “you’re sick and infected,” David Beuther, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells CNBC Make It.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Antibody Tests Deliver Peace Of Mind. They Don’t Say Anything About Immunity

    Jun 12, 2020 by CPR News
    “You might be safe where you may not get it again, but it’s likely just with most respiratory viruses, it’s temporal,” said Michelle Barron, medical director for Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital. “So you have some protection from getting the infection again for like a month or two, and then it goes away.”
    Full story
  • Steroid Showing ‘Glimmer Of Hope’ Among Sickest Coronavirus Patients

    Jun 16, 2020 by CBS4
    “The patients that require supplemental oxygen or ones that are on mechanical ventilation appeared to be the ones that benefited the most,” said William Janssen, the Section Head of Critical Care at National Jewish Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We’ve been using steroids in many of our patients with COVID-19 as well.”
    Full story
  • Department of Medicine Announces 2020 Rising Stars

    Jun 12, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine is pleased to announce the 2020 Rising Star Award recipients. The Rising Star Award recognizes outstanding early-career faculty members who exemplify the department’s core values of excellence in patient care, research, education and community service.
    Full story
  • What To Expect When You’re Expecting Results From A Coronavirus Test

    Jun 11, 2020 by CPR News
    After any potential exposure to COVID-19 it’s important to wait five to seven days — or until you show symptoms — to get a test, said Michelle Barron, medical director for Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • UCHealth now testing every admitted patient for COVID-19

    Jun 9, 2020 by Fox 31
    “I think we’re hoping we’re ahead of this curve, but widespread testing is kind of the key to that,” says Michelle Barron. Barron is UCHealth’s Medical Director for Infection Prevention and Control, and says the new policy went into place Monday.
    Full story
  • Antibody Tests Show UCHealth Workers Have Lower COVID-19 Infection Rates Than General Public

    Jun 9, 2020 by CBS4
    Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], encourages everyone to continue to be mindful of steps people can take to reduce exposure to and transmission of COVID-19.
    Full story
  • Lung Cancer in a Time of COVID-19

    Jun 2, 2020 by Medscape
    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the deadliest form, with a 5-year survival rate of just over 5%.​
    Full story
  • Docs’ Group Confronts ICE Over ‘Dangers of Detention’ From COVID-19

    Jun 1, 2020 by Medscape
    On May 18, Colorado Doctors for Camp Closure members offered enough masks to supply all 510 detainees at the GEO Aurora ICE detention facility, but ICE refused the offer, says Danielle Loeb, a member of the organization and an associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • State agencies consider which changes to telemedicine should be permanent

    May 29, 2020 by Channel 7
    Denver Health Internal Medicine doctor [and CU School of Medicine Assistant Professor] Jeremy Long told Denver7 Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance companies deciding to reimburse more providers for telehealth has increased access to healthcare.
    Full story
  • We Asked 2 Coronavirus Experts How They Feel About Going Out As Colorado Reopens

    Jun 1, 2020 by CPR News
    Michelle Barron, who oversees infectious disease control and prevention at UCHealth, got a cut and color May 22 from her stylist David MacDonald at Moda Salon in Denver. She’s known him for 20 years. As someone who is trained in infectious disease prevention, she grilled her stylist about how well he sanitizes the salon before she became his client. “Even before coronavirus I was the crazy person wiping everything down with wipes and using hand sanitizers,” Barron said. (Photo credit: CPR News.)
    Full story
  • Nearly 1,000 Coronavirus Patients Have Been Treated With Plasma, With The Help Of This Statewide Collaboration

    May 29, 2020 by CPR News
    David Beckham at University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine] has started a clinical trial that compares patients treated with plasma to a database of patients who did not receive the plasma nor participated in other clinical trials. So far, he and his team have enrolled 82 patients.
    Full story
  • Is it a bad idea to have summer fun in the time of coronavirus? Health experts rate risks, from camping to grilling to cruising Federal

    Jun 4, 2020 by Denverite
    “I think that’s the key thing for people to also understand is that we don’t know if there’s going to be another big wave where we see hundreds of cases (a day) or if we’re going to see maybe 10 cases,” says Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist at Aurora’s University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Joining crowds of Denver protesters brings risk of COVID-19 exposure. Here’s how to protect yourself –and when to get tested

    Jun 1, 2020 by Denver Post
    The new coronavirus mostly spreads via droplets when someone shouts, chants, sneezes or coughs, and people are most at risk when they are within 3 to 6 feet of an infected person, including carriers of the virus who don’t have symptoms, said Michelle Barron, medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • The coronavirus pandemic claims another victim: Medical research for deadly rare diseases

    Jun 4, 2020 by Washington Post
    Now, as medical institutions explore resuming non-coronavirus research, they say it will be hard to make up for lost time. Some researchers have to rebuild their colonies of specially bred animals. Many labs are implementing staggered work shifts to limit the number of employees at any one time. “I don’t see how we can maintain the levels of activity we had in the past,” said Craig Jordan, a leukemia researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Despite broader criteria, Colorado COVID-19 testing still lags

    May 27, 2020 by 9News
    “For us to be able to know how much disease is out there, we have to be able to test for it,” said Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • In Colorado, A Big Prison And A Small Community Share A Coronavirus Outbreak

    May 27, 2020 by KUNC
    Since the pandemic began, Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious disease expert at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, has visited jails in Colorado, Maryland and Michigan to carry out inspections.
    Full story
  • They Evoke Darth Vader, but These Masks May Save Your Doctor’s Life

    May 27, 2020 by The New York Times
    Abigail Lara [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] now wears one in a Covid-19 section of the I.C.U. “It takes a little bit of getting used to, but I find them to be comfortable,” she said. “I think we all appreciate that we were given this level of protection.”
    Full story
  • How Bad Is It Really to Sit With Your Legs Crossed?

    May 18, 2020 by Livestrong
    Here’s a quick primer on how circulation works: “Oxygen-rich blood comes out of the heart and delivers oxygen to your body through the arteries, giving your muscles and brain energy,” says Marc Bonaca, director of vascular research and associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and spokesperson for the American College of Cardiology.
    Full story
  • 8 Super Random Things That Could Be Giving You High Blood Pressure

    May 18, 2020 by Women's Health
    Caffeine is a powerful stimulant. This means it can wake you up, help you stay focused, and even get things moving in the bathroom. But this also means it spikes your blood pressure and stresses your heart, says Amber Khanna, a cardiologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Eating Dairy Every Day Linked to Lower Risk of Developing Diabetes and High Blood Pressure

    May 18, 2020 by Newsweek
    Robert H. Eckel, a past-president of the American Heart Association and Clinical Professor Emeritus at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who did not work on the study told Newsweek the findings are limited because the researchers relied on the participants accurately reporting what they ate.
    Full story
  • Is Testosterone Therapy Safe for Women?

    May 15, 2020 by Health Central
    “Testosterone drops with age more than with menopause,” says Margaret Wierman, professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and former Vice President of Clinical Sciences at the Endocrine Society.
    Full story
  • Blood test monitors long-term adherence to HIV medications

    May 14, 2020 by Chemical & Engineering News
    The test only takes 30 min and does not require mass spectrometers or other specialized equipment. This short turnaround time and easy processing is “really appealing,” says HIV researcher Jose R. Castillo-Mancilla of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, who was not involved with the study.
    Full story
  • Two ICE Detainees in Aurora Test Positive for COVID-19

    May 21, 2020 by Westword
    Carlos Franco-Paredes, an infectious-disease doctor with the University of Colorado, has urged the ICE facility to reduce the detainee population and release vulnerable individuals. “The potential for the spread of one of these outbreaks within that detention facility may have significant casualties,” Franco-Paredes wrote in a letter to local ICE leadership in March.
    Full story
  • Colorado frontline health workers share personal struggles with COVID-19

    May 18, 2020 by Fox 31
    Marc Moss, professor of medicine and head of the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Colorado School of medicine also took part in the Q&A seminar. “It’s [the pandemic] made a job where you’re dealing with people in crisis even more difficult,” said Moss, referring to the difficulty of making a connection with patients and their families during the pandemic.
    Full story
  • What you need to know about remdesivir, the experimental coronavirus drug that just arrived in Colorado

    May 15, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    Darlene Tad-y, the vice president of clinical affairs for the Colorado Hospital Association [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said the early studies on remdesivir are guiding hospitals’ decisions. “They’re looking to these studies to help identify patients who are in similar situations as those in the study,” she said.
    Full story
  • Colorado doctors using donated plasma to treat coronavirus patients

    May 17, 2020 by Denver Post
    Patients also have to be at least 18 and able to understand that the treatment is experimental, said David Beckham, an associate professor in the infectious diseases division on the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Study: Drinking 1 Or More Sugary Drinks A Day Could Put You At Risk For Cardiovascular Disease

    May 13, 2020 by CBS Sacramento
    One key strength of this study is that the “period of observation is longer — 20 years,” said Bob Eckel, a past president of the American Heart Association and a professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Changing Weather Is the Reason Your Allergy Symptoms Are All Over the Place

    May 12, 2020 by PopSugar
    “Seasonal allergy symptoms are driven by allergies to pollen, and most commonly to pollen that comes from plants or trees that utilize wind pollination. Anything that can make pollen more or less airborne can lead to changes in pollen counts and changes in allergy symptoms,” explains Lorelei Vandiver, an allergy and immunology specialist at UCHealth [and instructor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Prince George’s jail must plan to test more inmates for covid-19, federal judge orders

    May 11, 2020 by Washington Post
    Carlos Franco-Paredes, a clinician from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, examined the jail last week as part of the lawsuit….Franco-Paredes said during Monday’s hearing that during his inspection last week, jail officials appeared to be following jail operating recommendations by the CDC. “I think for the most part they were in compliance with CDC guidelines at the time of the inspection,” he said.
    Full story
  • Should you wear gloves at the grocery store?

    May 7, 2020 by 9News
    “The problem is that you’re touching everything,” said Michelle Barron, the medical director of Infection Prevention and Control at UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Would You Let The Government Track Your Smartphone If It Meant We Could Reopen Sooner?

    May 8, 2020 by Newsweek
    “In a fast-moving pandemic, protecting individuals’ rights to privacy limits the ability of the government to protect the health of the population,” says Eric Campbell, a researcher with the University of Colorado’s medical campus specializing in health policy and bioethics.
    Full story
  • Colorado doctors now have plenty of experience battling coronavirus – and they’re getting better at it

    May 12, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “I feel like we understand the disease better than we did in the beginning,” said Marc Moss, [head of the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine for CU School of Medicine] who works in pulmonology and critical care at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. “I think a lot of medicine is pattern recognition and the more patterns you see the more comfortable you are caring for those patients.”
    Full story
  • Students of medicine find new ways to learn – and help – during COVID-19 crisis

    May 6, 2020 by Colorado Springs Independent
    With campuses closed and hospitals becoming front lines in the fight against the novel coronavirus, students like those at University of Colorado School of Medicine have been thrown for an unprecedented loop. “It’s really changed everything,” says Erik Wallace, associate dean of the university’s Colorado Springs branch, who adds that when the pandemic hit, program officials essentially had to scrap normal curriculum at every level.
    Full story
  • The COVID-19 Diary of the University of Colorado Cancer Center

    May 6, 2020 by CURE
    D. Ross Camidge is the director of thoracic oncology and the Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, that had to rapidly react to the developments of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Full story
  • As We Watch Out For Coronavirus, A Silent Killer, Are Coloradans Wearing Masks Properly?

    May 1, 2020 by CBS4
    For professionals, there’s a sort of “grin and bear it” reaction with every trip to the grocery store, as described by UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine] infectious disease specialist Michelle Barron.
    Full story
  • How doctors are keeping patients safe as elective surgery resumes

    May 2, 2020 by ABC News
    “We’ve always had universal safety precautions for everyone in the hospital and operating room. Now, they are enhanced,” said Jean Kutner, chief medical officer for UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • COVID-19: 8 Steps for Getting Ready to See Patients Again

    May 7, 2020 by Medscape
    After COVID-19 hit the Denver area, internist Jean Kutner, and her clinical colleagues drastically reduced the number of patients they saw and kept a minimum number of people in the office.
    Full story
  • Colorado hospital working to develop treatments for COVID-19

    May 4, 2020 by Fox 31
    “I think remdesivir is the first step in developing effective treatments for COVID-19. It’s probably not the last step, and it may not turn out to be the best,” said Thomas Campbell, professor of Medicine-Infectious Diseases at the CU School of Medicine. Doctors at UCHealth are also examining Ruxolitnib, Sarilumad, and hydroxycloriquine, other drugs touted as potential game changers.
    Full story
  • Intratumoral mRNA-2416 monotherapy appears safe for patients with solid tumors

    Apr 28, 2020 by Healio
    “Of note, the majority of patients with ovarian cancer included in the study achieved a best overall response of stable disease along with noted clinical observation of tumor regression in injected as well as uninjected lesions, which supports further investigation of this tumor type,” Antonio Jimeno, professor in the [division] of medical oncology at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said during a presentation.
    Full story
  • COVID-19’s Impact on Patients and Care Providers

    Apr 28, 2020 by MD Magazine
    Marc Bonaca of the University of Colorado in Aurora, Colorado: “We are trying to do everything virtually for our patients with vascular disease. The need to come back for recurrent procedures or other issues is a real problem because we don’t want them to get infected. It’s a very fragile population.”
    Full story
  • COVID-19 Is Causing Blood Clots and Strokes in Some Patients – but Doctors Don’t Know Why

    Apr 27, 2020 by Health
    Inflammation may also play a big role in blood clotting among COVID-19 patients. “When there is very active and severe inflammation in the body, the surface of blood vessels can become disturbed and the clotting system can be activated,” Kathryn Hassell, a hematologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells Health.
    Full story
  • Why Colorado Can’t Get Enough Coronavirus Tests – And Why It’s Starting To Reopen Anyway

    Apr 23, 2020 by CPR News
    Other public health researchers say testing may be able to catch up, given the increased and growing availability. “I think it (testing) has significantly improved, and certainly from where we started to where we are now, it’s like night and day,” said Michelle Barron, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] who specializes in infectious disease at UC Health.
    Full story
  • What Does Remdesivir, Possible Treatment For Coronavirus, Do?

    Apr 30, 2020 by CBS4
    “Do you think the drug is working?” Gionet asked Connie Price, the Chief Medical Officer at Denver Health Medical Center [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “I think so, all early indications are that it is, and we need more data,” Price responded. “It prevents the virus from getting into the cell and replicating.”
    Full story
  • UCHealth part of remdesivir clinical trial to determine how long experimental drug should be used

    Apr 29, 2020 by Channel 7
    UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital is one of 150 hospitals around the world participating in the Gilead trial to determine if remdesivir should be given for five days or ten. “We did not see a significant differences in benefit from five days to ten days,” said Thomas Campbell, a professor at the CU School of Medicine and is helping to spearhead UCHealth’s portion of the study.
    Full story
  • Trials for promising COVID-19 drug happening in Colorado

    Apr 29, 2020 by Fox 31
    The trials started in February, and about a month ago, CU became involved. To date, 31 patients from UCHealth have been a part of the trial. “It’s very exciting,” said Thomas Campbell, a professor at the CU School of Medicine and part of a team that’s leading the trial at UCHealth. “This may change things for patients with COVID-19 in that we may now have a proven effective treatment.”
    Full story
  • Drug Tested In Colorado Shows Promise In Shortening Coronavirus Symptoms

    Apr 29, 2020 by CPR News
    Early results from clinical trials of remdesivir, an antiviral drug that has been tested in Colorado hospitals on patients with COVID-19, show that those treated with the drug may be getting better faster, with fewer deaths. “What I can say is that many patients have gotten better,” said Thomas Campbell, professor in the CU School of Medicine. He’s one of the physicians leading remdesivir clinical trials at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • ‘Silent hypoxia’ may be killing COVID-19 patients. But there’s hope.

    Apr 23, 2020 by LiveScience
    “This is not a new phenomenon,” said Marc Moss, the division head of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. There are other conditions in which patients are extremely low on oxygen but don’t feel any sense of suffocation or lack of air, Moss told Live Science. For example, some congenital heart defects cause circulation to bypass the lungs, meaning the blood is poorly oxygenated.
    Full story
  • ‘If not me, who?’ Denver ICU doctors talk about treating COVID-19 patients

    Apr 23, 2020 by Fox 31
    As of Thursday, Denver Health had 64 COVID-19 patients. Fourteen of them were on ventilators. And since the beginning of the year, the hospital has treated and discharged 175 coronavirus patients. “We’ve had some extraordinary successes,” said Ivor Douglas, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] the director of the hospital’s medical intensive care unit.​
    Full story
  • Isolation shelter sees few visitors, at least for now

    Apr 22, 2020 by Colorado Springs Indy
    “Individuals who have been experiencing homelessness, particularly chronic homelessness, have a high burden of chronic diseases that make them more susceptible to getting a severe infection,” says Heather Cassidy, community engagement director at the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Colorado Springs branch.
    Full story
  • Community-wide effort leads to homeless isolation shelter opening

    Apr 16, 2020 by Fox21 (Colorado Springs)
    “Our homeless neighbors often have high prevalence of chronic conditions and suppressed immune systems that make them particularly vulnerable to a severe course of illness if they get infected with coronavirus,” said Medical Advisor Heather Cassidy [assistant professor of medicine and director of community engagement for the CU School of Medicine Colorado Springs Branch].
    Full story
  • Denver dialysis centers separating patients with coronavirus to try to protect those at high risk

    Apr 18, 2020 by Denver Post
    Michel Chonchol, a nephrologist at University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said kidney disease interferes with the immune system, making patients on dialysis more vulnerable to all types of infections.
    Full story
  • Executive order catalyzes graduation of nursing students in hopes of bolstering workforce

    Apr 16, 2020 by Coloradoan
    CU School of Medicine’s 2020 graduating class will begin their residencies in July.
    Full story
  • People with deadly ailments are avoiding Colorado hospitals because they’re afraid of catching coronavirus

    Apr 22, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “We are being very safe, very clean,” said Jean Kutner, chief medical officer of UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora.
    Full story
  • UCHealth: Patients skipping ER visits due to COVID-19 fears

    Apr 20, 2020 by Fox 31
    Since the pandemic began, UCHealth has added virtual visits to more than 700 clinics. Demand for the service has increased more than 1,000 percent.
    Full story
  • How did we get here? Why the black community is being hit hardest by COVID-19

    Apr 20, 2020 by KOAA
    Erik Wallace, Associate Dean for the Colorado Springs Branch, at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, says environment and other social determinants are also factors.
    Full story
  • What can be done to protect vulnerable nursing homes?

    Apr 29, 2020 by Today
    Jeffrey Wallace, a gerontologist with the University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine], tells TODAY’s Al Roker how he believes we can protect vulnerable nursing home residents during the coronavirus pandemic.
    Full story
  • Here’s What Colorado’s New Normal Might Look Like In A Best-Case Coronavirus Scenario

    Apr 16, 2020 by CPR News
    Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said, so far, “The swab test is really quite good in terms of being able to detect active virus.”
    Full story
  • Daily Cheers Give Morale Boost to Medical Workers Fighting Coronavirus

    Apr 18, 2020 by Wall Street Journal
    Marc Moss, a professor of medicine [at CU School of Medicine] who has studied health-care-worker burnout, said nurses and doctors who work in the ICU traditionally have high rates of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress syndrome and suicidal thoughts…. Support from the public also helps.
    Full story
  • Colorado health care workers on the front lines of coronavirus fight speak out: “I’m afraid about being dead”

    Apr 18, 2020 by Denver Post
    Darlene Tad-y, the Colorado Hospital Association’s vice president for clinical affairs, did not exactly downplay the severity of the problem. In an interview Wednesday, Tad-y, who also practices medicine at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora [and is associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said it speaks volumes that the state’s 81 acute-care hospitals are now operating under a “Crisis Standards of Care” agreement, which lays out protocols for both the present and the worst-case scenario.
    Full story
  • Tofu, Other Isoflavone-Rich Foods May Cut Heart Disease Risk

    Apr 10, 2020 by Medscape
    The findings provide some additional value from data accrued from highly selected populations that consuming isoflavone-containing foods, particularly on a background of a heart-healthy dietary pattern, reduces the risk of developing heart disease, Robert H. Eckel, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.
    Full story
  • A Doctor on ICE’s Response to the Pandemic: “You Could Call It COVID-19 Torture”

    Apr 13, 2020 by Mother Jones
    Carlos Franco-Paredes, a professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s infectious diseases division, emphasized that crowded, enclosed spaces are the opposite of social distancing. By the time ICE quarantines a symptomatic detainee, that person will have likely have already infected others, he said. Those infected people will transmit the virus to others.
    Full story
  • Denver doctors helping fight COVID-19 in New York

    Apr 13, 2020 by Fox 31
    Some doctors at National Jewish Health in Denver are in New York this week helping the medical team at a Mount Sinai Hospital care for their COVID-19 patients. Josh Solomon is one of them. He is an associate professor of medicine at National Jewish Health [and CU School of Medicine] who specializes in pulmonary and critical care. “I’ve of course never seen anything like it,” he said from New York. “They got what we have, times 10.”
    Full story
  • The COVID-19 talk families need to have now

    Apr 14, 2020 by The Mercury News
    In a time when the pandemic has taken away people’s control over many aspects of their lives, “advanced care planning is one of the things under their control right now,” said Hillary Lum, a geriatrician and professor the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Get a medical power of attorney, doctors say

    Apr 12, 2020 by Fox 31
    Typically, these discussions about who should speak for you if you’re ill and how aggressive potentially end-of-life medical care should be are difficult. But the coronavirus pandemic is making them easier, said Dan Matlock, an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who specializes in geriatrics.
    Full story
  • Good Question: Is Exercising Outside A Greater Threat?

    Apr 15, 2020 by CBS4
    Infectious disease specialist Michelle Barron of UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital says time of exposure remains a big deal. “You still have to have some pretty generous contact time and so if you’re running… you’re fine if you’re passing people and making sure you’re staying some distance apart.”
    Full story
  • These Are The Treatments And Cures Colorado Researchers Are Developing For Coronavirus

    Apr 11, 2020 by CPR News
    Thomas Campbell, at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, is working on a clinical trial of sarilumab, an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The trial was developed jointly by the pharmaceutical companies Regeneron and Sanofi.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus disproportionately affecting people of color

    Apr 10, 2020 by Fox 31
    “The healthcare system needs to not forget that we saw this stark disparity and make changes to address it going forward,” said Shanta Zimmer, University of Colorado School of Medicine Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion. “We need to make sure that no sectors of our population are left behind.”
    Full story
  • Colorado Matters April 10, 2020: Gov. Polis Talks Testing, State’s Future; What A Day In The ICUS Is Like

    Apr 10, 2020 by CPR News
    Marc Moss, head of the Division of Pulmonary Sciences & Critical Care for the CU School of Medicine, interviewed (Starts at 24:21 and ends at 33:10).
    Full story
  • Calming the Inflammation Storm to Protect the Lungs in COVID-19Opens in a new window

    Apr 16, 2020
    During recent grand rounds for the Department of Medicine, faculty members from the School of Medicine weighed in on ways to combat the inflammation storm in COVID-19.
    Opens in a new window Full story
  • What Does VOYAGER PAD Mean for Antithrombotic Therapy?

    Apr 3, 2020 by Medscape
    Interview with Marc Bonaca, a cardiologist as well as a vascular medicine specialist at University of Colorado, about one of the hottest topics being presented at the virtual ACC are the results of the VOYAGER PAD trial.
    Full story
  • 7 Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms Every Woman Should Know About

    Apr 6, 2020 by She Knows
    The symptoms of RA depend, to some extent, on how far the condition has progressed. According to Kevin Deane, a rheumatologist with UCHealth Rheumatology Clinic-Anschutz Medical Campus, as well as an associate professor of medicine and the William P. Arend Chair for Rheumatology Research at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, the most common symptoms at the onset of RA are pain, stiffness and a feeling of swelling in and around the joints.
    Full story
  • Should health concerns trump economic concerns during crisis?

    Apr 5, 2020 by Colorado Springs Gazette
    Op-ed by Jake Fox, a Colorado Springs native and a fifth-year medical and public health student at CU, and Erik Wallace, an Associate Professor of Medicine at the CU School of Medicine: “Our best recourse as a nation is one that abides by our guiding principles in medicine — as we navigate this crisis together, we should strive to uphold the value of individual lives and minimize death as best we can.”
    Full story
  • End-Of-Life Planning Conversations Are Hard, But We Can’t Avoid them Now That Coronavirus Is Here

    Apr 6, 2020 by CPR News
    Hillary Lum, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said people should make decisions based on their perception of the quality of life.
    Full story
  • Rideshare drivers take extra precaution in driving amid stay-at-home orders

    Apr 6, 2020 by Fox4 (Cape Coral, Fla.)
    “I think a lot of it is, again, having a physical barrier is actually not such a bad thing,” explained Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • COVID-19 in Colorado: Four weeks later

    Apr 2, 2020 by 9News
    Four weeks after Colorado announced its first case of COVID-19, we asked UCHealth’s Michelle Barron five important questions.
    Full story
  • Colorado hospitals looking for plasma donors to fight COVID-19

    Apr 7, 2020 by 9News
    “It has, for some patients in the past, shown that it might have helped in previous outbreaks of virus infections like Ebola or previous SARS outbreaks,” said University of Colorado Hospital Infectious Disease Specialist David Beckham, adding that it’s unclear how effective plasma transfusions will be against COVID-19.
    Full story
  • Local business, university and hospital labs working to create new COVID-19 protection measures, treatments

    Apr 7, 2020 by Fox 31
    “When someone gets infected with COVID-19, their body makes an immune response,” UCHealth [and CU School of Medicine] infectious disease specialist David Beckham said. Last week, UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital became the first in the state to treat COVID-19 patients with a serum made up from the blood, specifically antibodies, from someone who recovered from the disease.
    Full story
  • University of Colorado Hospital tries “promising” treatment for COVID-19, but doctors still cautious

    Apr 7, 2020 by Channel 7
    “We are going to study the data to understand if these patients are actually getting better or improving with the treatment," said David Beckham, a UCHealth infectious disease expert. "Right now we don’t know if convalescent serum is going to make COVID-19 patients any better.”
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Pandemic: Evergreen Doctor Is First In Colorado To Be Treated With Convalescent Plasma

    Apr 6, 2020 by CBS4
    “We don’t have great evidence that this is going to work,” said David Beckham, an infectious disease researcher with the CU School of Medicine. He says convalescent plasma has the potential to work in some patients, but he sees it as a stopgap.
    Full story
  • A nightmare approaches: Hospitals painfully prepare for life and death decisions

    Apr 7, 2020 by AAMC
    A pilot test being run by UCHealth, affiliated with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, shows a typical way that medical institutions plan to carry out those principles. Matthew Wynia, director of the university’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities, says that each day, triage teams there get sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores about every inpatient.
    Full story
  • There’s No Crisis Care Plan In Idaho, But Officials Are Working On One

    Apr 7, 2020 by Boise State Public Radio
    “You don’t want the individual clinician — the doctor, the nurse — at the bedside trying to make decisions within their own patients about who gets this and who gets that,” added Matt Wynia who directs the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Who Gets A Ventilator Or An ICU Bed? Colorado Issues Crisis Guidelines For Health Care Workers

    Apr 6, 2020 by KUNC
    “There are some folks who might be under the impression that if there's a need to make these kinds of triage decisions that their doctor would be looking at them and saying, “are you worthy of a ventilator or not?” And that’s not the preferred way to do this. Nationally the consensus is that your doctor should be able to advocate for you as their patient,” said Matthew Wynia is the Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Who Should Doctors Save? Inside the Debate About How to Ration Coronavirus Care

    Apr 3, 2020 by Newsweek
    The teams have better “situational awareness” of the resources available in nearby hospitals, which can affect decisions about what to do with individual patients. “God forbid someone makes a tragic choice to allocate a resource to one person and the other ends up dying, and then three days later you realize there was another hospital six miles away where we could have transferred them,” says Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Americans With Disabilities Are Terrified

    Apr 3, 2020 by The Atlantic
    “We need to be able to look back and say we made those decisions in a way that maintains the trust of the community, that maintains social cohesion, and allows us to heal,” says Matt Wynia, the director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado at Anschutz.
    Full story
  • Anti-malaria drug shortage impacting Coloradans with auto-immune disorders

    Apr 8, 2020 by 9News
    “I understand the fear,” UCHealth Rheumatologist Kevin Deane [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said. “However, we don’t know that the medicine works [for COVID-19].”
    Full story
  • How Far Is Colorado From Peak Coronavirus? It’s Hard To Tell

    Apr 6, 2020 by CPR News
    On Monday, Jason Persoff, assistant director of emergency preparedness at the UCHealth hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], too tempered his initial optimism, saying the state’s data “suggests that the curve might, might, be flattening. However, it’s just too early to know for sure.”
    Full story
  • Colorado health officials ‘certain’ state hasn’t reached COVID-19 peak, say distancing is working

    Apr 7, 2020 by Channel 7
    The Colorado Hospital Association’s vice president of clinical affairs, Darlene Tad-y, [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said in a statement Tuesday that the message to continue physical distancing was the right one and that the CHA agreed with the state model rather than other models.
    Full story
  • Colorado Hospital Association Warns Against Believing Coronavirus Models

    Apr 7, 2020 by CBS4
    “There are a lot of models out there. There are many assumptions that go into creating a mathematical model to predict the number of patients we might see who become infected with COVID-19,” said Darlene Tad-y the Vice President of Clinical Affairs for the Colorado Hospital Association [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Why are Colorado hospitals sending people with coronavirus home? There’s not much they can do.

    Apr 3, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “There are no medical therapies, there are no drugs we can give these patients,” said Marc Moss, who leads the pulmonology and critical care departments at the University of Colorado medical school
    Full story
  • Low-dose rivaroxaban reduces risk in PAD post-revascularization

    Mar 28, 2020 by Healio
    The benefit of rivaroxaban was “apparent early and continued over time,” Marc P. Bonaca, associate professor and director of vascular research at University of Colorado School of Medicine, said while presenting the results during the virtual American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
    Full story
  • Opinion: Colorado legislators must regulate immigrant detention centers

    Mar 29, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    Opinion column by Carlos Franco-Paredes, Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at CU Anschutz Medical Center: “The prompt release on parole of detainees with medical conditions at risk of severe disease and death due to coronavirus infection may reduce the impact of this outbreak among immigration detention facilities.
    Full story
  • Vaping, smoking might increase risks from COVID-19

    Mar 30, 2020 by Fox17
    David Beuther, Chief Medical Information Officer at National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine,] says while vapers and smokers are at a greater risk, the risk of developing more severe complications is even greater.
    Full story
  • ‘There’s nothing about it that will feel right’: Hospitals are gearing up to choose which patients to save if they run low on crucial equipment

    Apr 2, 2020 by Business Insider
    “It’s stressful. It’s really stressful,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado. “If this has to happen, there’s nothing about it that will feel right.
    Full story
  • Sheltered At Home, Families Broach End-Of-Life Planning

    Mar 31, 2020 by Lancaster Online
    “We’ve always had the requirement that people get asked about an advance care plan, but now we are taking that incredibly seriously,” said Matthew Wynia, a University of Colorado bioethicist and infectious disease doctor. “Because we need to know if you get much worse, what would you want?”
    Full story
  • Not So Fast Using CPAPs In Place Of Ventilators. They Could Spread The Coronavirus.

    Mar 27, 2020 by Kaiser Health News
    James Finigan, a pulmonology and critical care specialist at National Jewish Health in Denver [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Theoretically, a CPAP might be enough to get them enough oxygen. But, again, doing it with a mask is more likely to generate an aerosol and create an infectious problem.” Jeff Sippel, a critical care specialist at UCHealth [and associate professor of clinical practice of medicine at the CU School of Medicine], said BiPAPs could be used for COVID-19 in a closed system without a mask if patients are first fitted with a breathing tube.
    Full story
  • Denver Health’s Lead Coronavirus Doctor Wants Your Help To Slow The Pandemic

    Mar 27, 2020 by CPR News
    Ivor Douglas [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] has a hard job that’s only going to get harder. The intensive care pulmonologist is leading the COVID-19 response at Denver Health.
    Full story
  • Shared spaces in apartment buildings present a challenge during social distancing

    Mar 31, 2020 by Fox 31
    The Problem Solvers sat down digitally with Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital to discuss some “best practices” during this pandemic in shared spaces you can’t avoid.
    Full story
  • Good Question: Should We Be Wearing Masks?

    Apr 1, 2020 by CBS4
    CBS4’s Alan Gionet turned to an expert for some answers, Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. “I have a lot of questions about masks, like a lot of people do,” Gionet told Barron.
    Full story
  • The mask debate: CDC considers advising more to wear masks to prevent COVID-19

    Mar 31, 2020 by Channel 7
    “From a public standpoint, is there any harm or any potential that it would be helpful? Maybe,” said Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention and Control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Colorado Is Creating Guidelines To Help Make Excruciating Coronavirus Care Decisions

    Apr 2, 2020 by CPR News
    “Crisis standards of care is not a decision point. It is thrust upon you. You have to make decisions. These are forced choice,” said Matthew Wynia, the Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Colorado readies guidelines for prioritizing coronavirus patient care in case of hospital overload

    Apr 1, 2020 by Denver Post
    “There may be dire circumstances where our resources are unable or are insufficient to provide optimal care to everyone,” said Darlene Tad-y, a physician at the University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “This is statewide guidance on how to do triage in the most ethically defensible way,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Specialists, Primary Care Doctors Retrain For Hospital Frontlines As Colorado Coronavirus Cases Mount

    Apr 2, 2020 by CPR News
    “It’s just going to be a matter of getting back on the bike and riding it. Undoubtedly, I’ll look at some references, to make sure my memory serves,” said Rich Altman. “The medical skills aren’t that different … So the training isn’t specifically, how do you diagnose pneumonia? Because everyone sort of knows that,” said Tyler Anstett. Brandon Combs is among those gearing up to head into a hospital after working in a UCHealth outpatient clinic in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood for the past several years.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus In Colorado: Hoarders Warned To Turn Over Essential Medical Items

    Mar 31, 2020 by CBS4
    Marc Moss appeared with Gov. Jared Polis at a news conference on Monday to emphasize the need for the protective and medical equipment.
    Full story
  • Colorado governor says spread of coronavirus is slowing, but says second person in their 40s has died

    Mar 30, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    Marc Moss, who leads the pulmonology and critical care medicine division at the University of Colorado medical school, accompanied Polis during Monday’s news conference….“The COVID patients we are treating are on average in their 40s and 50s and some are as young as 19 years old,” he said.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Now Claiming Lives Of Colorado Patients Under 50

    Mar 30, 2020 by CBS4
    “New patients are being admitted to the hospital at a faster rate than patients are recovering, and as a result the hospital census is steadily increasing, putting even more strain on our capacity and resources,” said Marc Moss from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who joined Polis to talk about the state’s health care crisis.
    Full story
  • Intermittent fasting, a new trend in dieting, focuses on when you eat

    Mar 23, 2020 by Worcester Business Journal
    “No one diet works for everyone,” said Vicki Catenacci, an associate professor of medicine in endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus puts spotlight on infection control at Colorado hospitals

    Mar 23, 2020 by Denver Post
    The processes to avoid spreading the new virus are relatively simple. Staff need to put on their full protective equipment and quickly move the patient to an isolation room, then decide if the patient needs to be tested, stay in the hospital or go home, said Darlene Tad-y, vice president of clinical affairs for the Colorado Hospital Association [and associate professor of medicine for CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • A 42-year-old died in ICE custody, becoming their 10th death in six months

    Mar 23, 2020 by New York Daily News
    Carlos Franco-Paredes, a professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s infectious diseases division, pointed out in an open letter last week that immigration detention facilities could become particularly lethal during the pandemic due to their large population density.
    Full story
  • ICE Is Ignoring Recommendations to Release Immigrant Detainees to Slow the Spread of Coronavirus

    Mar 20, 2020 by Mother Jones
    In a letter published on Thursday, Carlos Franco-Paredes, a professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s infectious diseases division, painted a grim picture of how the coronavirus could affect people in detention: For an immigration detention center that holds 1500 detainees, we can estimate that 500-650 may acquire the infection.
    Full story
  • If it gets bad, Colorado doctors have a plan for who gets lifesaving coronavirus treatment – and who doesn’t

    Mar 24, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “It’s very military-style triage,” said Matthew Wynia, the director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and a national expert on crisis standards of care.
    Full story
  • Who Should Be Saved First? Experts Offer Ethical Guidance

    Mar 24, 2020 by The New York Times
    “It would be irresponsible at this point not to get ready to make tragic decisions about who lives and who dies,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • U.S. Hospitals Prepare Guidelines For Who Gets Care Amid Coronavirus Surge

    Mar 21, 2020 by NPR
    “So if you had someone who was an upstanding member of the local community or a big donor to the hospital or a well-known politician versus a clerk at the 7-Eleven or a homeless person,” said Matthew Wynia, an infectious disease and public health specialist who directs the University of Colorado's Center for Bioethics and Humanities, each of those patients should be evaluated equally.
    Full story
  • Ethical dilemmas in the age of coronavirus: Whose lives should we save?

    Mar 19, 2020 by Los Angeles Times
    “Everyone’s on red alert and gaming things out and saying, ‘What are we going to do if…?’” said Matthew K. Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.
    Full story
  • Two Denver hospitals start in-house COVID-19 testing, results in 24 hours rather than days

    Mar 23, 2020 by Channel 7
    “You gain a lot of time with the transport to a large commercial lab in another location and that’s probably the greatest savings in terms of why it’s so much faster,” said Stephen Frankel, Executive Vice President of Clinical Affairs at National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • State lab has backlog thousands of tests deep for COVID-19

    Mar 20, 2020 by 9News
    While testing supply shortages have limited that number, Connie Savor Price, [Denver Health’s] Chief Medical Officer [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said the in-house testing has allowed her staff to save on an ever-dwindling supply of personal protective equipment.
    Full story
  • Colorado hospitals are preparing their doctors and nurses for an all-hands-on-deck coronavirus fight

    Mar 25, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    Jean Kutner, chief medical officer for UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, said pulmonologists at Children’s Hospital Colorado have offered to help.
    Full story
  • Shipment of 2 million masks to ease Colorado’s medical supply shortage in face of coronavirus’ spread

    Mar 23, 2020 by Denver Post
    When caring for a person who could have COVID-19, providers should wear a mask, an eye shield, gloves and a gown, said Michelle Barron, medical director for infection control and prevention at University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Medical Students, Sidelined for Now, Find New Ways to Fight Coronavirus

    Mar 23, 2020 by The New York Times
    Shanta Zimmer, senior associate dean for education at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said the school decided that 184 third-year medical students would not return to their clinical rotations starting last Monday, for at least four weeks.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus: Only one hospital bed for every six ‘seriously ill’ US patients in event of rapids surge, report says

    Mar 13, 2020 by The Independent (London)
    Matthew Wynia, director of the Centre for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told Business Insider “a surge in confirmed coronavirus cases could also lead to a shortfall of medical supplies like ventilators, as well as the staff required to properly use such devices.
    Full story
  • For State’s Nursing Homes, Coronavirus A Test Of Residents, Staff

    Mar 13, 2020 by CPR News
    Jeff Wallace, a geriatrician at the Multidisciplinary Centers on Aging at CU Anschutz Medical Campus, said restricting access early is one of the things Colorado has learned from the outbreaks at nursing facilities in Washington state that left 19 dead and dozens infected.
    Full story
  • Expanding Colorado’s COVID-19 Testing Capacity Proves Frustrating To Polis, Doctors And The Public

    Mar 16, 2020 by CPR News
    Many doctors aren’t equipped to test in their private offices because they don’t have the facility requirements — including negative-pressure rooms to keep the virus contained — to provide them. “If I wasn’t so engaged and involved in this every day, I’m not sure I would understand it,” said Michelle Barron, an infectious disease expert at University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • Weeks Ahead Of When Coronavirus Will Peak In Colorado, Hospitals Are Already Seeing Shortages

    Mar 17, 2020 by CPR News
    “Everything” hinges on testing as hospitals respond to the upswing in possible coronavirus patients, said Connie Price, chief medical officer at Denver Health, who is also a professor of infectious diseases [at CU School of Medicine]. Jason Persoff, a physician [and associate professor medicine at CU School of Medicine] leading COVID response efforts at another large Colorado hospital system, UCHealth, shared somewhat similar concerns.
    Full story
  • Colonoscopy Skills Report Card Boosts ADRs, for Some

    Mar 9, 2020 by Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News
    “We saw that adenoma detection rate significantly improved by [an absolute] 3.2% among lower-performing colonoscopists, but did not significantly improve among all colonoscopists or among higher-performing ones,” said Anna Duloy, a fellow in advanced therapeutic endoscopy at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Lung Valves Are Alternative To Surgery For Advanced Emphysema

    Mar 10, 2020 by CBS4
    Linda was facing surgery to remove the diseased lobe, or a lung transplant. But Ali Musani, interventional pulmonologist at University Hospital, offered her another option. “There is no incision or cutting of the chest wall required,” Musani said.
    Full story
  • Why you should always visit a travel health clinic before heading abroad

    Mar 11, 2020 by MSN
    While there’s a strong focus on immunizations to combat potentially infectious diseases, patients at travel clinics are given advice to help them during every step of their journey, including how best to prevent diarrhea, mosquito bites and blood clots on long distance flights, said Andrés Henao, travel clinic director at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • If Covid-19 gets bad, triage will be needed. Are we ready for that?

    Mar 10, 2020 by STAT
    Matthew K. Wynia, professor of medicine and public health and director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and co-author of this article states: “The emergence of a new infectious disease that rapidly spreads around the world, like Covid-19, makes disaster planning experts move into overdrive."
    Full story
  • Does coronavirus outbreak make a case for Medicare-for-all?

    Mar 9, 2020 by Yahoo! Finance
    Matthew K. Wynia, a doctor and the director of the University of Colorado’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities told the Daily Beast that anxiety about incurring massive expenses is the opposite of what is wanted with the emergence of a potential pandemic.
    Full story
  • Doctor explains how viruses thrive in cold weather

    Mar 6, 2020 by 9News
    At some point in your life, you may have heard someone say, ‘You better put a coat on, or you’ll catch a cold.’ Maybe you’ve even said that yourself, but is it true? “So they are right, but probably for the wrong reason,” said David Beuther, a pulmonologist with National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Concerning For People With Compromised Immune Systems

    Mar 6, 2020 by CBS4
    The threat of infection from coronavirus, is especially concerning for people with compromised immune systems. Thomas Campbell works in the CU Cancer Center, his advice to patients about COVID-19 is simple.
    Full story
  • What you need to know about coronavirus quarantine and isolation orders

    Mar 12, 2020 by Denver Post
    Both are essentially orders for a person to stay out of contact with other people in an attempt to curb the spread of an infectious disease, said Robert Belknap, an infectious disease doctor at Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Your Healthy Family: UCHealth tightens hospital visitor policy

    Mar 11, 2020 by KOAA
    Michelle Barron, an infectious disease expert with UCHealth, says a virtual visit is a good way to assess a viral infection if you’re looking for care advice on things like a cold, the flu or even COVID-19.
    Full story
  • Two Cases Of New Coronavirus Found In Colorado

    Mar 5, 2020 by CPR News
    “Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands, wipe down surfaces with sanitizing wipes. Keep your phone clean too,” said Michelle Barron, medical director for Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • ‘We Are In Pandemic Territory’: All Hands On Deck As Hospitals Prep For Coronavirus Surge

    Mar 10, 2020 by CPR News
    “It is a huge concern,” said Darlene Tad-y, the hospital association’s vice president of clinical affairs [and associate professor of medicine for CU School of Medicine]. Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital, pointed to other disease outbreaks as a demonstration of what can happen.
    Full story
  • Colorado Changed Its Rules So Undocumented People Can Get Regular Dialysis. It’s Saved Lives and Dollars

    Mar 4, 2020 by CPR News
    “Doctor Lily” is Doctor Lilia Cervantes, with Denver Health [and CU School of Medicine]. She’s been treating dozens of undocumented people with kidney failure for years. Cervantes has seen the vicious cycle they have to deal with — going in and out of the emergency department.
    Full story
  • CDC guidelines on male facial hair goes viral amid coronavirus fears

    Feb 27, 2020 by Yahoo Lifestyle
    Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], clarifies to Yahoo Lifestyle why the guide might not exactly be relevant to the general public in preparing for coronavirus outbreaks: “These CDC guidelines apply to healthcare workers who wear respirators — not the standard masks for the public at large.”
    Full story
  • Coronavirus Is Here: What We Know So Far

    Feb 28, 2020 by Rolling Stone
    And Michelle Barron, an infectious disease specialist at UCHealth in Colorado, says that the virus can’t survive in the conditions under which packages are generally transported.
    Full story
  • Colorado Is Sold Out Of Medical Masks Due To Coronavirus Fears. Don’t Worry, You Don’t Need One

    Feb 28, 2020 by CPR News
    “The reality is that people don’t actually need the masks,” said Michelle Barron, medical director for Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • As Coronavirus Spreads, Should Travel History Be in Your Medical Records?

    Mar 3, 2020 by U.S. News & World Report
    “The current outbreak is an opportune time to consider adding travel history to the routine. The COVID outbreak is clearly moving at a tremendous pace, with new clusters appearing daily,” said Trish Perl, chief of infectious diseases and geographic medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
    Full story
  • Asking This One Question May Help Slow Down Coronavirus Outbreak

    Mar 3, 2020 by Healthline
    Trish Perl, chief of infectious diseases and geographic medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and Connie Price of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, write today in a commentary Trusted Source in the Annals of Internal Medicine that travel history should be collected alongside other routine patient information, such as temperature and blood pressure.
    Full story
  • During A Pandemic, States’ Patchwork Of Crisis Plans Could Mean Uneven Care

    Mar 5, 2020 by Kaiser Health News
    “You definitely don’t want people making those decisions in the heat of the moment, when they haven’t slept and they haven’t eaten and there’s no air conditioning,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • From rationing masks to polishing emergency plans, here’s how Colorado hospitals are preparing for the coronavirus

    Mar 2, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “That’s the way hospitals operate,” said Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Research Day - Held Remotely

    Mar 3, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The Department of Medicine’s 8th annual Research Day is now being held remotely via Zoom (not in person). Join us on Monday, April 6 beginning at 10am at https://ucdenver.zoom.us/j/435270995 Abstracts and posters will also be posted online on the Research Day website. Visit the 2020 Research Day event page for more information.
    Full story
  • Dr. Sarah Rowan Discusses Colorado's Ongoing Fight to End HIV with 5280 Magazine

    Aug 30, 2019 by 5280
    Dr. Rowan spoke about her work on a local HIV task force to expand testing and treatment of the virus and about other efforts by the Colorado medical community to combat HIV.
    Full story
  • AROUND TOWN: Leadership Pikes Peak honors alumni community leaders

    Feb 23, 2020 by Colorado Springs Gazette
    The Modeling the Way Community Leadership Award, for an LPP alumni “whose leadership in their professional career has motivated their colleagues, friends, family, and/or community members to get involved,” went to Erik Wallace, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Colorado Springs branch, associate dean.
    Full story
  • Physicians’ Equity in Company Marketing Cosmetic Drug Faces Ethical Questions

    Feb 10, 2020 by Inside Sources
    Eric Campbell, a professor of medicine and director of research at the University of Colorado medical school’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities, agrees that Jeuveau’s business model is “something that is of concern.”
    Full story
  • Penn got $258 million in foreign money, and there may be more it hadn’t disclosed

    Feb 24, 2020 by Philadelphia Inquirer
    Eric Campbell, a professor of medicine and bioethics expert at the University of Colorado, said it’s not surprising that global drug companies would be involved with a major research university such as Penn.
    Full story
  • Cocoa a Novel Rx for Peripheral Artery Disease?

    Feb 26, 2020 by Medscape
    Also commenting on the study for theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology, William R. Hiatt, professor of medicine, division of cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, said that, “while potentially interesting, I think it is too early to determine if cocoa is clinically effective to treat claudication.”
    Full story
  • Coloradans should prepare for the coronavirus like they would a snowstorm, health officials say

    Feb 27, 2020 by Denver Post
    “It’s appropriate to say we will probably see more cases in the U.S. and throughout the world, but I don’t think that should set off an alarm,” said Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.
    Full story
  • Health expert answers your questions about Coronavirus

    Feb 26, 2020 by 9News
    Michelle Barron, the director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth, answers your questions about the coronavirus.
    Full story
  • How Denver has prepared for possible coronavirus outbreak

    Feb 26, 2020 by 9News
    We asked a similar question of Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth, about what social isolation would look like: “Most of it would probably involve limiting big public gatherings, so if a Phish concert was happening, perhaps that would be asked to be canceled.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus vs. flu in Colorado

    Feb 21, 2020 by 9News
    UCHealth Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] discusses the impact of coronavirus vs. the flu this winter.
    Full story
  • Native American Blessing Ceremony Opens New Genomics and Health Research Lab

    Feb 18, 2020 by CU Anschutz Today
    Perhaps the future of modern, transformative medicine begins with a bridge to the past. “Our genes are as old as the universe – everything that proceeded us is now. In Navajo culture, the past is the now,” said Diné (Navajo) traditional healer David Begay, PhD. Begay, an associate professor from the University of New Mexico, was recently invited to the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus by Katrina Claw, PhD, a Diné (Navajo) geneticist, to lead a Native American ceremony for Claw’s new genomics lab in the Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine.
    Full story
  • Subsequent risk elevated after hospitalization for major adverse limb events

    Feb 12, 2020 by Healio
    Connie N. Hess, interventional cardiologist and associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado and clinician-scientist at CPC Clinical Research, and colleagues analyzed 393,017 patients (mean age, 69 years; 41% women) from the Premier Healthcare Database who underwent peripheral artery revascularization between 2009 and September 2015.
    Full story
  • How intermittent fasting can benefit your heart health

    Feb 10, 2020 by KTBS (Shreveport, La)
    New research suggests doing so can lower your blood pressure, cholesterol, and resting heart rate. But Andrew Freeman, a cardiologist at National Jewish Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], says you can defeat the purpose of intermittent fasting if you’re not careful.
    Full story
  • If You Have Diabetes, Pay Attention to Your Heart

    Feb 11, 2020 by Next Avenue
    “Total management of the disease should include diet, exercise, regular cholesterol testing and glucose monitoring,” said Jane E.B. Reusch, a cardio-endocrinologist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center. She also practices at the Rocky Mountain Regional Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
    Full story
  • How A Good Night’s Sleep Helps Your Blood Sugar Levels

    Feb 7, 2020 by MSN
    “Overall, the literature suggests people with sleep disorders have a 25-30 percent higher risk of developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes,” says Robert H. Eckel, professor of medicine emeritus in the division of endocrinology, metabolism, and diabetes at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, and president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association.
    Full story
  • ‘We’re all free now!’: Coronavirus evacuee opens up about life on Air Force base as quarantine is lifted

    Feb 11, 2020 by Yahoo Lifestyle
    “We quarantine all the time — children with lice stay home from school and people with the flu don’t go to work,” Michelle Barron, medical director of infection prevention and control at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], tells Yahoo Lifestyle.
    Full story
  • Patients Restrained in ED Report Dehumanization, Lasting Harm

    Jan 31, 2020 by Medscape
    “These patients’ voices remind us that we can learn a great deal about clinical care and about ourselves by listening to the people we meet as patients,” Abraham Nussbaum, associate professor of psychiatry, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities, University of Colorado, Aurora, write in an accompanying editorial.
    Full story
  • Coronavirus explodes into global health emergency

    Feb 5, 2020 by La Voz
    “It (the virus) was finally genetically coded by the end of December,” Gaby Frank, Medical Director for the Biocontainment Unit at Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine, said]. “On December 31st, they identified that it was the coronavirus.”
    Full story
  • People traveling through DIA wear masks as coronavirus spreads in China

    Jan 30, 2020 by 9News
    “The goal is to prevent it from going beyond the borders but obviously that can be challenging because people can travel,” said Michelle Barron, an Infectious Disease Specialist at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Specialty drugs are saving lives in Colorado and beyond. But who should pay for them?

    Feb 4, 2020 by Colorado Sun
    “For personalized medicine to truly be successful in the United States, we need to have payers on board,” said Kathleen Barnes, director of the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine on the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Professor takes on bioengineering challenge of building new lungs

    Feb 6, 2020 by CU Connections
    For decades, the Petri dish has been used to culture cells and learn more about disease. What would happen if a Petri dish was no longer needed because human tissue could be replicated? Would new results advance biomedical research? That question is what Chelsea Magin and her team are working on, developing cell culture platforms that mimic lung tissue.
    Full story
  • How EHR improvements help both providers and patients

    Jan 29, 2020 by Healthcare Finance
    The health industry should be excited about the advancements in EHR technologies, says Larry Allen, the medical director of advanced heart failure at University of Colorado School of Medicine.
    Full story
  • Human and Analogue Insulins Equivalent for Major Outcomes

    Jan 24, 2020 by Medpage Today
    Robert Eckel, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, who was not involved in the research, said the large number of human insulin users was unusual. Still, “with all of the limitations of retrospective analysis of medical records, the results are not surprising,” he told MedPage Today via email.
    Full story
  • Worried About Coronavirus? Don’t Stress Too Much, But Here Are 3 Things To Do That Can Help Keep You Healthy

    Jan 27, 2020 by CPR News
    “Given the number of cases that we’re seeing in China and other parts of the world, it won’t be unexpected if we do have a positive case at some point,” said Michelle Barron, the medical director of infection prevention at the University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Colorado patient tests negative for coronavirus, hospital says public health risk is low

    Jan 24, 2020 by 9News
    “It’s actually a cold virus,” said Michelle Barron, medical director of Infection, Prevention, and Control at UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • ‘Traumatic as hell’: Patients describe what it’s like to be restrained in the ER

    Jan 24, 2020 by STAT
    “Rapid control of an out-of-control situation is the default in ER settings. That’s definitely not ideal for someone in a psychiatric crisis,” said Matthew Wynia, a physician and bioethicist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
    Full story
  • Department of Medicine Announces 3rd Annual Recipients of Clinician-Educator Faculty Grants

    Jan 29, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine has selected the third cohort of recipients of its Program for Academic Clinician Educators (PACE).
    Full story
  • Denver Health says it is prepared if the new coronavirus is detected in Colorado

    Jan 21, 2020 by Fox 31
    “We’re not entirely clear whether we need to activate those centers for this type of infection yet. We are ready to do so and we have available protocols to be able to provide experimental treatments,” said Connie Price.
    Full story
  • Denver Health Says It’s Ready For Possible Coronavirus Outbreak

    Jan 22, 2020 by CBS4
    “As of now it has been estimated as the same severity as that of the flu,” said Gaby Frank, Medical Director of the Bio Containment Unit at Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Coloradans monitoring coronavirus outbreak, no local cases reported

    Jan 22, 2020 by 9News
    Cells in a coronavirus are not unusual, according to the medical director of Infection, Prevention, and Control at UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital, Michelle Barron [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
    Full story
  • Evaluating Next Steps for Entrectinib in ROS1-Positive NSCLC

    Jan 17, 2020 by Targeted Oncology
    Robert C. Doebele, an associate professor in the Division of Medical Oncology at the School of Medicine, University of Colorado, shares his thoughts on what the next steps are for entrectinib (Rozlytrek) in patients with ROS1-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
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  • Sex Hormones Linked to Asthma Risk

    Jan 21, 2020 by MD Magazine
    “Whereas prior large-scale epidemiological studies have attributed changes in asthma-related outcomes to sex hormones only by proxy (i.e., puberty or menstrual period), the results from this study, by directly measuring serum levels, significantly strengthen causality,” wrote Fernando Holguin.
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  • Task force aims to reduce deaths by suicide

    Jan 20, 2020 by The Gazette (Colorado Springs)
    Erik Wallace, associate dean of the Colorado Springs Branch of the CU School of Medicine, one year ago founded the Colorado Springs Firearms Safety Think Tank.
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  • Tiffin native earns grant to focus on cancer treatments

    Jan 11, 2020 by The Advertiser-Tribune (Tiffin, Ohio)
    Ohio Wesleyan student Ben Arnold (left) celebrates the presentation of his summer research project. Arnold worked at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in the laboratory of Raphael Nemenoff.
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  • Dr. Flaig on Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Advanced Bladder Cancer

    Jan 9, 2020 by OncLive
    Thomas W. Flaig, professor, associate dean for clinical research, Genitourinary Cancer Program, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, discusses the utility of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced bladder cancer.
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  • Arvada Dad Joshua Calderon Finds A Path To Weight Loss

    Jan 15, 2020 by CBS4
    “It is absolutely that long-term relationship that allows patients to be successful,” said endocrinologist Leigh Perreault [visiting associate clinical professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
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  • Telemedicine support group offers convenience, community to young adults with cancer

    Jan 16, 2020 by Healio
    “We know that our younger patients are often still working; many of them have young families,” Laura Melton, medical director for supportive oncology at University of Colorado Cancer Center at University of Colorado Hospital, said.
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  • Most Health Care Workers In Colorado Are Required To Get Flu Shots, But Are They?

    Jan 14, 2020 by CPR News
    And in general, the rules have been a success, according to Matt Wynia, the Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities on the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus and an early supporter of the state regulations.
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  • Department of Medicine Annual State of the Department Talk Presented

    Jan 13, 2020 by Department of Medicine
    The University of Colorado Department of Medicine annual State of the Department talk was presented by David A. Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine and Immunology and Robert W. Schrier Chair of Medicine.
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  • What you don’t know about idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is breathtaking

    Jan 13, 2020 by Cathy Beuten
    Little-known and often misdiagnosed, this fatal lung disease has met its match at CU Anschutz. David A. Schwartz, MD along with his colleagues in the Department of Medicine and across the globe are changing that.
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  • Kevin K. Brown, MD, Named Chair of the Department of Medicine at National Jewish Health

    Dec 11, 2019 by P&T Community
    Internationally renowned pulmonologist Kevin K. Brown, MD, has been named the new Chair of the Department of Medicine at National Jewish Health.
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  • Despite Obesity Epidemic, Doctors Don’t Prescribe Obesity Drugs

    Dec 6, 2019 by Medscape
    The study by David R. Saxon, an endocrinologist at the University of Colorado, found that overall, only 1.3% of eligible patients filled a prescription for an antiobesity medication, and prescribing rates ranged from 0.6% to 2.9%.
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  • Struggling for air: How performers not used to Denver’s elevation train to put on a mile-high show

    Dec 2, 2019 by The Denver Post
    “For most people, it doesn’t make a difference,” said James Maloney, a pulmonologist with UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
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  • This medical center is one of the only places you can go if you’re dying from an eating disorder

    Nov 26, 2019 by KSBY News
    At least 30 million Americans suffer from eating disorders.
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  • For Your Heart, Eat Fish or Take Pills? A Dose of This Drug Equals 8 Salmon Servings

    Nov 25, 2019 by NPR
    “Pharmaceutical drugs are regulated by the FDA, so the manufacturing has to meet high standards, so you can be sure that when you take it you are getting the amount listed on the label, and it is safe and free of impurities,” says Cecilia Low Wang.
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  • Diagnosis criteria for COPD should be expanded to include CT scan, other factors

    Nov 19, 2019 by Radiology Business
    “Our proposed diagnostic criteria better capture the full spectrum of people suffering from COPD,” said James Crapo.
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  • New Cystic Fibrosis Treatment Considered A ‘Game Changer’

    Nov 19, 2019 by CBS Denver
    Hannah’s pulmonologist, Jennifer Taylor-Cousar [and professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care], gets emotional, too. “It is truly a miracle for her and for many, many people,” said Taylor-Cousar.
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  • HF Benefit of Dapagliflozin Affirmed in Non-Diabetics

    Nov 16, 2019 by Medpage Today
    Fewer CV events for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.
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  • Coloradans dealing with lung diseases after working on military bases with garbage burn pits

    Nov 12, 2019 by Fox 31
    “Ten years ago, I don’t think we knew anything about burn pits. I don’t think we even knew the term burn pits,” said Cecile Rose, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].
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  • Lung Cancer Patient, Doctor Q&A Provides ‘Hope With Answers’

    Nov 11, 2019 by CBS Denver
    A University of Colorado Cancer Center oncologist is described as one of the leading minds in lung cancer.
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  • Does waist size predict dementia risk?

    Nov 6, 2019 by Medical News Today
    The first large-scale cohort study of its kind looked at the link between waist circumference in later life and the risk of dementia in a population of older Asian adults.
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  • Burnout is rampant among doctors and nurses. Can the arts help?

    Nov 5, 2019 by PBS.org
    For decades, art therapy has been used to help patients. But today, people like Moss are looking at how it can also help health care providers.
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  • ‘Rational combination therapies’ stand as the next step in thyroid cancer

    Nov 4, 2019 by Healio
    Bryan R. Haugen received the 2019 Sydney H. Ingbar award during the Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association.
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  • Annual meeting highlights intersection of obesity, diabetes

    Nov 4, 2019 by Healio
    “ObesityWeek is really the central hub for science on obesity treatment and weight management,” Paul MacLean, professor at CU Anschutz Medical Campus and an ObesityWeek program committee co-chair, told Endocrine Today.
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  • Defibrillation testing losing ground as a safety check for ICDs

    Nov 4, 2019 by Cardiovascular Business
    “The benefits of DFT (defibrillation testing) have not routinely been demonstrated,” Ryan T. Borne, of CU Anschutz Medical Campus, and colleagues wrote in JAMA Network Open.
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  • Your Health: New chemical compound targets leukemia stem cells

    Nov 1, 2019 by WQAD News
    Oncologist Dan Pollyea did have one option: an FDA approved clinical trial testing a low dose chemo combined with the pill venetoclax, a drug that targets leukemia stem cells.
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  • A woman was dying of liver cancer, until a hepatitis C-infected organ saved her life

    Oct 26, 2019 by ABC News
    “What have I done?” James R. Burton Jr. thought to himself in disbelief. As a young medical student, he had taken the Hippocratic Oath and pledged “first, do no harm.” But here he was, purposefully infecting one of his patients with hepatitis C.
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  • Sexual Orientation in Men Can Affect the Intestinal Flora Which Can Raise the Risk of HIV Infection

    Oct 25, 2019 by Gilmore Health
    The co-authors of the study are Sam X. Li and Catherine Lozupone from the Medical Campus of the University of Colorado Anschutz.
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  • Sharing Stories Connects Clinicians to Each Other, Patients

    Oct 24, 2019 by Medscape
    Palliative care doctor Katherine Morrison, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, remembers when she was asked to talk to a group of internal medicine residents who had been dealing with some “difficult things” on their rotation.
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  • Gabow honored by National Academy of Medicine

    Sep 19, 2019 by CU School of Medicine
    Patricia Gabow, MD, professor emerita of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and former CEO of Denver Health, has today been named the recipient of the Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care.
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