Project SCOPE

 

Project SCOPE: Supporting Children of the Opioid Epidemic, is a national training initiative intended to build nationwide, interdisciplinary provider capacity and confidence in applying evidence-based practices in screening, monitoring, and interdisciplinary support for children and families diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS), or who are suspected of being impacted by opioid use, trauma, or related exposure.

The curriculum includes, but is not limited to, current research on developmental outcomes of prenatal exposure to opioids and other substances, trauma-informed care, provider secondary trauma stress, and strategies to support caregivers. This initiative is intended to improve outcomes by linking research to practical application in local communities, providing opportunities to share knowledge and findings with national networks and federal agencies, and providing recommendations for future interventions.

Fridays, September 17 to November 12, 2021 (*excluding October 1)
8:30 - 10:00 AM (Mountain Time)

DateTopic
Sept 17, 2021Intro to the Opioid Crisis/Social Determinants of Health
Sept 24, 2021Trauma, Addiction, Health, and Treatment
Oct 8, 2021Self-Reflective Practice and Having Difficult Conversations 
Oct 15, 2021Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Monitoring Child Dev 
Oct 22, 2021Emotions and Behaviors of Trauma-Exposed Children
Oct 29, 2021Trauma, Substance Exposure, and Language Development
Nov 5, 2021Trauma, Substance Exposure, and Sensory Concerns
Nov 12, 2021Resiliency, Linking Services, and Wrap Up

 

Project ECHO® is a lifelong learning and guided practice model that exponentially increases workforce capacity to provide the application of best practices. The heart of the ECHO model is its hub-and-spoke knowledge-sharing networks, led by expert teams who use multi-point videoconferencing to conduct learning sessions about evidence-based practices in education, health, and disability services. With this method, educators, healthcare providers, special service providers, case managers, administrators, and families have access to expert advice right in their homes, schools, and offices.

ECHO Networks provide ongoing support for educators, healthcare providers, and families in state regions, e.g., rural areas, where specialized knowledge is not always available locally. By removing these barriers to specialized knowledge, outcomes for students, patients, and families are improved.

Project SCOPE links research to practical application in local communities, improves outcomes, provides opportunities to share knowledge and findings with national networks and federal agencies, and provides recommendations for future interventions. Participants receive highly relevant professional development, specific guidance, and ongoing support related to their needs and concerns. This results in interdisciplinary teams that are trained to work more effectively with their clients.

The Project SCOPE network provides ongoing resources and support to train participants in evidence-based best practices on screening, monitoring, and ongoing support to children and families coping with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), Neonatal Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS), and related issues.


Lorraine F. Kubicek, PhD, IMH-E (R) Project Director, JFK Partners, CU-AMC

Abigail Angulo, MD, MPH, Developmental Pediatrics, CHCO/CU-AMC

Melissa Argenti, MS OTR/L, JFK Partners, CU-AMC

Anne Auld, Director of Education, Illuminate Colorado

Renee Charlifue-Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, JFK Partners, CU-AMC

The initial pilot of Project SCOPE was developed in 2018 by the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities, in partnership with the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. Training is focused on the impact of childhood trauma, medication-assisted treatment for addiction, developmental outcomes, family supports, and service coordination. Training participants included special educators, early interventionists, social workers, physicians, psychologists, nurses, administrators, foster parents, and recovering mothers. 

The Nisonger Center and the University of Cincinnati UCEDD have provided the curriculum that includes current research on brain development, developmental outcomes of prenatal exposure to opioids and other substances, trauma-informed care, provider secondary trauma stress, and strategies to support caregivers. The Wyoming Institute for Disabilities has developed an ECHO model network to implement this curriculum. 

This Office of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities project also reflects an exciting collaboration between federal agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Programs National Training Initiative, Health Resources and Services Administration, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Department of Education. (2020-2022)