Clinical Epidemiology Division

The Clinical Epidemiology program at the Barbara Davis Center encompasses a group of prospective observational research studies focused on the etiology and complications of type 1 diabetes, as well as other autoimmune diseases.  Currently the Clinical Epidemiology Program includes the efforts of 5 Barbara Davis Center faculty investigators and over 40 research staff, adult and pediatric research clinics, and a shared research laboratory.

DAISY

The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) study was the first Clinical Epidemiology project at the BDC. Funded in 1993 and continuously supported through 2020 by the National Institutes of Health (Dr. Rewers, PI), the DAISY study strives to find the cause of type 1 diabetes by observing the natural history of islet-cell autoimmunity and progression to diabetes in children at high genetic risk. Building from the DAISY cohort, other studies have been funded including the C-peptide in the Young PREServation Study (CYPRESS), (Dr. Steck, PI) and the Infant Vitamins in the Young (IVY) and IVY’omics studies (Dr. Norris, PI). The CEliac Disease Autoimmunity Research (CEDAR) study began in 1995 to examine celiac disease occurrence in patients with type 1 diabetes, their relatives and the public (Dr. Rewers, PI.)

DAISY

The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) study was the first Clinical Epidemiology project at the BDC. Funded in 1993 and continuously supported through 2020 by the National Institutes of Health (Dr. Rewers, PI), the DAISY study strives to find the cause of type 1 diabetes by observing the natural history of islet-cell autoimmunity and progression to diabetes in children at high genetic risk. Building from the DAISY cohort, other studies have been funded including the C-peptide in the Young PREServation Study (CYPRESS), (Dr. Steck, PI) and the Infant Vitamins in the Young (IVY) and IVY’omics studies (Dr. Norris, PI). The CEliac Disease Autoimmunity Research (CEDAR) study began in 1995 to examine celiac disease occurrence in patients with type 1 diabetes, their relatives and the public (Dr. Rewers, PI.)